Selected videos

titel, thesen, temperamente

Daniel Hope spielt Filmmusik

LISTEN TO

Cover

Escape to Paradise

  read more

YouTube

Watch my chanels on youtube

  youtube

Concert Reviews



2014


Reporter’s Life Under Apartheid, in Music, Dance and Typewriter
New York Times, 29.10.2014

‘A Distant Drum’ Recalls the Life of Nathaniel Nakasa

By JON PARELES

The brief, vivid, apartheid-warped life of a South African journalist, Nathaniel Nakasa, was commemorated in “A Distant Drum,” a music-theater piece presented at Zankel Hall on Tuesday night. It was part of Carnegie Hall’s Ubuntu Festival marking 20 years of democracy in South Africa.

With no songs, “A Distant Drum” was not an opera, but it wasn’t exactly a play either. Two actors, speaking in rhyme and sometimes dancing, performed within the semicircle formed by a jazz-tinged chamber group; the music shared the foreground and, at times, provided rhythm to turn the dialogue into something like rap. A violinist — the work’s artistic director, Daniel Hope — played sweet-tone melodies, dressed as a blind fiddler. The script is by Christopher Hope, Daniel’s father, a novelist and poet who left South Africa in 1975 to escape censorship. Ralf Schmid, the pianist onstage, composed the music.

During the clampdown of 1960s apartheid, Mr. Nakasa wrote influential reports for Drum magazine, finding grim humor in apartheid and envisioning the white power structure as human beings rather than faceless enemies. “What I do see through the cracks of our button-down state/Is a comedy of terror run by the inmates,” the Nakasa character, played by Nat Ramabulana, said onstage. Later, he vowed, “Life may be killing us, but we’ll die laughing.”

Mr. Nakasa was under police scrutiny and eventually faced a banning order that would have severely restricted his activities. An American professor, Jack Thompson of the Farfield Foundation (which was later revealed to be a front for C.I.A. sponsorship of cultural programs), helped Mr. Nakasa get a Nieman journalism fellowship to Harvard in 1965. The South African government refused him a passport; to visit the United States, he had to accept a permanent exit permit from South Africa. But Mr. Nakasa found the United States, with its own racial tensions and its misconceptions about Africa, disappointing and depressing. In July 1965, he was found dead in New York City; he had fallen from Mr. Thompson’s high-rise apartment. Mr. Nakasa’s name is now attached to a South African award for journalistic integrity.

“A Distant Drum” mingles the dreamlike and the didactic. It sketches Mr. Nakasa’s story by pairing him with a composite white South African policeman assigned to his surveillance, played by Christiaan Schoombie, who declares, “The Lord created the races/To live in separate spaces.” Switching to an American accent, Mr. Schoombie also plays Mr. Thompson. Mr. Nakasa and his white interlocutors usually appear side by side, their movements balancing, at one point dancing in tandem.

The music echoed South African jazz, with a handful of recurring themes and the recorded voices of South African choirs. Upbeat township dance music, modal vamps and waltzes, pizzicato riffs for cello and bass — constantly enlivened by Jason Marsalis on drums — made way for pensive, sustained violin melodies. Mr. Nakasa’s typewriter often joined the rhythm section. Mr. Schmid’s music went a good way toward animating the dialectical dryness of the script. What came through most strongly is that 20 years have not dimmed the harsh memories of apartheid.

Edinburgh’s Festival – Queen’s Hall, Review
Edinburgh Guide, 25.08.2014

Show details
Venue: Queen’s Hall
Running time: 120mins
Performers: Anne Sofie von Otter (mezzo soprano), Daniel Hope (violin), Bengt Forsberg (piano), Bebe Risenfors (accordion/double bass/guitar)

The ensemble this morning consisted of the Swedish mezzo soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, the violinist Daniel Hope, the pianist Bengt Forsberg and Bebe Risenfors who played accordion, double bass and guitar.

The concert centred around and simulated the type of cabaret musical events which were performed and composed by talented musicians who were incarcerated in the Czechoslovakian Terezin concentration camp where the bulk of the Jewish ‘cultural elite’ were interned. Music has the ability to transcend barriers and pain and many of the compositions played this morning were written inside the camp and as such have a certain poignancy.

The choice of programme, with its range of musical genres, afforded the audience an opportunity to hear the virtuosity of the players.

Anne Sofie von Otter’s versatile voice comfortably oscillated from the tenderness of Erika Taube’s ‘Ein judisches Kind’ (A Jewish Child) to Manfred Greiffenhagen’s jazzy piece ‘Das Lied von den zwei Ochsen’ (The Song of the Two Oxen).

Bengt Forsberg played accomplished, sensitive piano in Karel Berman’s selection of eight pieces entitled ‘Reminiscences, in which some of the pieces were technically extremely challenging.

Daniel Hope was superb on violin – particularly in the second movement of Erwin Schulhoff’s Sonata for Solo violin – and Bengt Forsberg provided funky bass in ‘Das Lief von den zwei Ochsen.’

It was a moving concert and a reminder of the power of music which even when one is in the depths of despair still has the ability to move emotions and even, at times, create joy.

Soundstreams opens with an enchanting season themed euphoria
Musical Toronto, 02.10.2014

By Michael Vincent

There were some big draws to the September 30, Soundstreams’ season opening concert at Koerner Hall. For one, famed British violinist Daniel Hope was in town to present the Canadian premiere of contemporary music superstar Max Richter’s The Four Seasons Recomposed. There was also a rare performance of 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner John Luther Adams’ piece, Dream in White on White. Montreal-born composer Paul Frehner, was also there to premiere his new work, Mojave Dreaming – a piece inspired by nature, weather, the seasons and atmospheric phenomena.

The occasion started with a slow passage through “a treeless windswept landscape of Western Alaska.” Composed in the early 1990’s by US-based composer John Luther Adams, Dream in White on White is essentially an early sketch for an idea that was later realized in 1998 as In the White Silence. It was curious that Soundstreams chose to program the early draft over its more mature form, but it certainly has it charms.

Adams’ music is always a commitment to process, and the Soundstreams Virtuoso String Orchestra – conducted by Joaquin Valdepeñas, seemed to be at a loss as how to interpret its austere, glacially slow temperament. Valdepeñas conducted it with a dry mechanical distance, and focused on exploring the vast background string clusters, leaving the foreground material to fend for itself against the Yukon timber-wolves.

Despite the disappointing start, Paul Frehner’s Mojave Dreaming was the redemption we were looking for. The piece was totally vibrant and alive with imagination. Scored for string orchestra and tape, it was loosely inspired by Vivaldi’s Seasons. Instead of focusing on depicting all four seasons, Frehner fixated on an endless desert summer, with melting trees, hypnotizing mirages, and swirling sand storms.

This was a psychedelic affair, akin to trying to find the time of day on Dalí’s melting clock. Valdepeñas seemed to have great fun exploring the various programmatic elements which came in-and-out of focus. First violinist, Stephen Sitarski was particularly impressive with his near-flawless high register intonation and fancy fretwork.

After an intermission, the evening was just getting started with Max Richter’s Recomposed Vivaldi: The Four Seasons (2012), under the bow of the great British violinist, Daniel Hope. The piece is a kind of avant-garde classical remix of Vivaldi’s iconic masterpiece.

Let me start by saying a lot of people confuse Max Richter’s Recomposed project as being about updating the Four Seasons for a contemporary audience. There is a kind of intellectual hurdle to overcome when first hearing the premise of the piece. Daniel Hope told the story before the Koerner Hall crowd of how he first responded to the idea of the piece saying “what’s wrong with the original?”

Nothing is wrong with it. The Seasons is so much more than a mere piece of music. It has become an idea, a musical symbol that has richly benefited from the early music world’s constant redefinition of period sound and style. Richter’s reworking is in fact a baroque idea – an exploration of repetitive sequences and variations. Not minimalist per se, but close. Richter shares a similar spirit of baroque passion and sensibility, with a twist of late-romantic Korngold film music. If you allow yourself to hear the work through the filter, it works. Richter’s remix plays with your musical expectations and acts like a cut-up collage, composed of recognizable clips and cuts of an image being assembled in real-time.

Hope makes it entirely his own, and plays the achingly lush lines – that sound very much like Purcell at times, with an extraordinary poise and depth. This is at once a celebration of spring’s rejuvenation. It’s endless summer days give way to the smell of burning leaves and dim-lit autumn mornings. The season ends with a whimper – a winter’s sigh that brings to a close what was once alive with boundless energy.

Richter is a polymath, who rides the cleavage between classical music’s future and past. Vivaldi is lovingly remembered not through another endless re-re-interpretation, but from the point of creative genesis. The composition itself. Why not?

*A special mention regarding the superb sounding harpsichord, performed by Gregory Oh.  It sounded unusually wonderful.

A well deserved standing ovation – bravo.

Daniel Hope and Sebastian Knauer review – bewitching Brahms
The Guardian, 08.10.2014

St George’s, Bristol
The passion and muscularity was unmistakable in Hope and Knauer’s exploration, part of Radio 3’s Brahms Experience

by Rian Evans
This week, Johannes Brahms is the subject of BBC Radio 3’s up-close-and-personal focus. The Brahms Experience is proceeding on the basis that if he is the love-him-or-hate-him, Marmite composer of the 19th century, he is also a taste that can be acquired. And, if conversion is the exercise, it’s live experience of his music in an acoustic like St George’s that ought to make all the difference. The passion of Daniel Hope and Sebastian Knauer’s violin and piano duo recital was unmistakable, with the fire of the lone FAE Scherzo setting the agenda in uncompromising fashion.

Frei aber Einsam (Free but Lonely) was the motto adopted by Joseph Joachim, the violin virtuoso who inspired Brahms. Hope’s own crusade on the violinist’s behalf has shed light on Joachim’s deep commitment to performing Brahms’s then quite new work across Europe. Playing lyrical Romanzes written by Joachim himself and by Clara Schumann added to the picture of a close circle of friends, as did Joachim’s arrangement of Mendelssohn songs, Auf Flügeln des Gesanges, and Hexenlied, the latter delivered with suitably bewitching force.

Central to the evening were the two Brahms sonatas, in D Minor, Op 108, and in G Major, Op 78. In both instances, Hope began in a gently understated way, disarming and immediate, but, over the course of the movements, the luscious tone he drew from his instrument gave a visceral quality to the expansive melodies. Knauer’s muscular sound is also fundamental to the partnership: together they brought atmosphere and drama to the D Minor, as well as lightness in its Scherzo, while realising their most expressive and heartfelt playing in the G Major Sonata.

Die Violine windet sich im Schmerz der Verfolgung
Frankfurter Neue Presse, 22.09.2014

Das erste Museumskonzert der Saison eröffnete das Musikfest „Opus 131“ in der Alten Oper Frankfurt. Mit dem englischen Geiger David Hope.

Zum Festbeginn mit dem Leitthema „Aufbrüche in der Musik“ beigetragen haben natürlich das klangstarke, klangvielfältige Museumsorchester unter Sebastian Weigle, vor allem aber der fabelhafte britische Geiger Daniel Hope, der auf seiner Guarneri del Gesù (1742) ein Geschenk an Musik bescherte, intim, intensiv, höchst emotional. Das eine Geschenk: Erich Wolfgang Korngolds Violinkonzert, das dieser 1945 für den legendären Jascha Heifetz komponierte. In Los Angeles und eben nach einem großen Aufbruch in die amerikanische Sicherheit. Man muss bei solchen Lebensdaten immer die Lebensumstände mitbedenken.

Der Österreicher Korngold (seine Oper „Die tote Stadt“, 1923–27, war in Frankfurt zu erleben), schon als junger Mann höchst produktiv, wurde von den Nazis mit Aufführungsverbot belegt und total enteignet. Dass er sich in Amerika geldeshalber mit Filmmusik abgab, sicher nicht einmal ungern, merkte man diesem jetzigen Konzert an. Es sind viele Anleihen darin, manchmal fast ein 3D-Sound, doch der Geiger Daniel Hope bindet das alles zu einem geradzu duftenden Bukett: die Sentimentalität, ja das Schluchzen, die sich anschleichende Pfiffigkeit und Süffisanz, dann noch den keck-kessen Tonfall und manchmal sehr schöne schräge Klänge.

Ein Memento war Hopes Zugabe, der zweite Satz aus Erwin Schulhoffs Violinsolosonate. Schulhoff (1894 Prag–1942 KZ Wülzburg) ist den Nazis nicht davongekommen. Dieses Werk kann zu Tränen rühren, auch in seinem sanften Entschwinden. Hope hat dafür eine starke Ader.



2013


Ein Dream-Team für die Strings
Neue Luzerner Nachrichten, 21.01.2013

Mit Gastsolist Danie Hope gehen die Festival Strings neue Wege und halten doch an Altem fest. Das zeigt das erste Konzert mit dem Stargeiger.

Artikel

Bewegende Intensität
Bremer Nachrichten/Weser-Zeitung, 08.03.2013

Es war ein ungewöhnliches, aber gerade deshalb umso faszinierenderes Programm, das der Geiger Daniel Hope und die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen in der Glocke anboten. Zwei Werke für Streichoktett von Felix Mendelssohn und Dmitrij Schostakowitsch wurden von der Kammersinfonie op.110a von Schostakowitsch und dem Violinkonzert von Mendelssohn umrahmt(…)

Das “Schlagerstück” des Abends, das Violinkonzert von Mendelssohn, brachte dann neuartige Akzente (…) vieles klang dramatischer, ja feuriger and “kantiger” als die heute bekannte Version. Daniel Hope bot eine meisterhafte Leistung; das Orchester war für dieses exzellente Aufführung ein optimaler Partner.

 

von Éva Pintér

Handgranate eines Anarchisten
kreiszeitung.de , 09.03.2013

Bremen – Von Ute Schalz-Laurenze

„D-Es-C-H“ ist das selbstbewusst herausgeschleuderte Viertonmotiv von Dimitri Schostakowitschs Kammersinfonie c-Moll, op. 110 a. An einen Freund hatte er geschrieben, dass wahrscheinlich nach seinem Tod niemand mehr an ihn denken wird und deswegen wolle er das nun selber tun: die Noten sind die Anfangsbuchstaben seines Namens.

Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie trug im letzten Konzert ihren Teil dazu bei, dass das gelingen könnte: ohne Dirigent, mit extremer, auch bruitistischer Wucht und unbeschreiblicher Zartheit, mit bewundernswert gehaltener Spannung und ebenso bewundernswerter Homogenität gelang den Streichern ein interpretatorisches Meisterstück. Doch nicht nur da: Auch die Wiedergabe des frühen Oktettes für acht Streicher op. 11, gelang als „Handgranate eines Anarchisten“, wie ein Uraufführungskritiker 1925 schrieb. Dass die „sozialitische“ Musikkultur unter Stalin nicht nur die berühmte „Lady Macbeth“ nicht vertrug, sondern schon dieses kraftvolle Werk des Neunzehnjährigen, machten die MusikerInnen geradezu beglückend klar.

Schon viele Jahre war ein Konzert mit dem britischen Geiger Daniel Hope gewünscht. Hope ergänzte das beispielhaft gute Programm mit der führenden ersten Geige im Oktett Es-Dur op. 20, dem Geniestreich eines Wunderkindes: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy war 16 Jahre alt, als er es schrieb. „Dies Oktett muss im Style einer Sinfonie in allen Stimmen gespielt werden, die Pianos und Fortes müssen sehr genau und deutlich gesondert und schärfer hervorgehoben werden, als es sonst bei Stücken dieser Gattung geschieht.“ Genau das vollzogen die Streicher perfekt. Unnachahmlich schnell und zart zog die feehnafte Geisterwelt des Scherzos an uns vorüber, riss uns die wilde Schlussfuge in einen überwältigenden Bann und blühte im ersten Satz reine Streicherlust auf.

Höhepunkt allerdings des ohnehin schon an Höhepunkten reichen Konzertes war dann zum Schluss die Wiedergabe des Violinkonzertes in e-Moll, op. 64 von Mendelssohn Bartholdy. Hier erfüllte Daniel Hope natürlich alle hochvirtuosen Forderungen, darüberhinaus aber gelang ihm eine Wiedergabe von bewegender Tiefenchärfe. Besonders in der Kadenze des ersten Satzes entdeckte und spielte er tragische Akzente, die dann wieder landeten in einem unbescheiblichen Schmelz schöner Klanggebung. Das kann man vielleicht anders machen, strenger, klassizistischer, aber nicht besser. Überraschend dann Hopes Ansage für die geforderte Zugabe: mit einem solchen Orchester im Hintergrund spielt man nicht alleine! Und so setzte er sich als Konzertmeister ans Pult: die Orchesterbearbeitung des „Geister“-Scherzos aus dem Mendelssohn’schen Oktett war dann der wirkliche Schluss eines Sternstundenkonzertes.

Biedersinn und die Brandstifter
Echo Online, 18.03.2013

Festival – Heidelberger Frühling beginnt mit Daniel Hope und dem NDR-Orchester

HEIDELBERG. Aus der konventionellen Aneinanderreihung von Stücken ein starkes Stück zu machen – das ist beim Sinfoniekonzert zum Auftakt des Festivals  „Heidelberger Frühling“ am Samstag gelungen.

 

Draußen lässt der strenge Vorfrühling sein eisblaues Band durch die Lüfte flattern, drinnen in der Heidelberger Stadthalle bringen Geiger Daniel Hope und das NDR-Sinfonieorchester das Publikum mit Felix Mendelssohns e-Moll-Violinkonzert in Hitzewallungen. Nicht der einzige überbrückbare Gegensatz beim Auftaktkonzert des Heidelberger Frühlings, der für einen Monat Brennpunkt klassischer und neuer Musik in der Region sein will.

Der in Wien lebende britische Geiger nimmt den romantischen Gestus beim Wort, überführt den Notentext mit Vibrato, Rubato und dem Portamento genannten stufenlosen Erklimmen der Töne in eine persönliche An- und Aussprache. Atemberaubend selbstverständlich hat darin die Raserei der Kopfsatz-Kadenz und des Finales ihren Platz.

Thomas Hengelbrock wiederum, seit 2011 Leiter des Hamburger Orchesters, ist ein in der Wolle gefärbter Spezialist für Alte Musik, der freilich längst zum musikalischen Vollsortimenter geworden ist. Das Gute der Klang-Quellenforschung hat er hörbar bewahrt: den tänzerischen Impuls, wo es passt, Leichtigkeit und Transparenz, alles gebunden durch den Sinn für Verläufe und Zielpunkte.

Beide, Geiger und Dirigent, haben natürlich Recht, und so wird für die Urfassung von Mendelssohns Konzert sogleich der gemeinsame Nenner gefunden. Nur selten ist Hengelbrock als Animateur seines Orchesters gefragt, das meiste entrollt sich von selbst, der langsame Satz wirkt als Zaubergarten der Zartheit gar wie eine Schöpfung, nicht wie ein gemachtes Kunstwerk.

Dass Hope nach dieser sensationellen Vorstellung seine Bearbeitung eines Stücks des im Dezember gestorbenen indischen Meisters Ravi Shankar vorstellt, schafft einen weiteren Gegensatz, auf den sogar im Programmheft entschuldigend hingewiesen wird: Ausgerechnet zum Auftakt haben die Macher des Heidelberger Frühlings, der doch ein Musik-Labor sein soll, ein geradezu bieder den Gewohnheiten folgendes Programm konzipiert.

Schon den ersten aufflammenden Tutti-Einsatz von Gustav Mahlers Fünfter übersteht dieser Einwand nicht, so schwerelos in aller Gewichtigkeit teilen sich die Vorzüge dieser Konstellation mit. Prachtvolle Orchesterfarben nutzt Hengelbrock, um Mahlers Geschichte vom ewigen Werden und Vergehen so nahezubringen, wie es geht. Einen der vorgeschriebenen Zusammenbrüche illustriert er durch ein Zusammensinken am Pult mit hörbaren musikalischen Folgen, und wehe, wenn die zweiten Geigen in einem solchen Moment nicht untergehen wollen – sogleich trifft sie ein indignierter Blick.

Dabei kann der Dirigent auch laufen lassen, das Ziel wurde schließlich vorher verbindlich vereinbart. Mozarts Mini-Sinfonie KV 318 hat es der straffen Tempi wegen schleunigst erreicht, ohne dass Wesentliches am Wegesrand zurückbleibt. Runde Schlagfiguren Hengelbrocks wirken der von ständigen Akzenten drohenden Eckigkeit entgegen. In diesem Geiste geben sich 60 Instrumentalisten, als spielten sie in kleiner Gruppe im Kämmerlein. Dem Publikum wird es frühlingswarm ums Herz.

Von Christian Knatz

Der Geiger als Straßenplaner
Dresdner Neueste Nachrichten, 22.04.2013

Daniel Hope und Camerata Salzburg in der Frauenkirche

Man muss gar kein regelmäßiger Konzertgänger sein, ein bisschen Anstand tut es auch, um einzusehen: Spätestens dann, wenn das Orchester vorn begonnen hat zu musizieren, könnte das raschelnde Sortieren der Einkaufstüten unter der Kirchenbank fehl am Platze sein. Den Musikern der Camerata Salzburg wie Arvo Pärts “Trisagion” für Streichorchester war am Sonnabend in der Frauenkirche erst nach rund drei Minuten endlich die nötige
Aufmerksamkeit vergönnt. Pärts Klänge schreien nicht mit Paukenschlägen “Hört her!”, man muss sich ihnen bewusst öffnen, ihnen Raum geben, ihren Puls annehmen, ihre Stille mitleben – und zulassen. Dann sind sie ungemein
faszinierend, und zumindest gen Ende hin durfte man das dann auch erfahren.

Pärts auf einen alten orthodoxen Hymnus auf die Heilige Dreifaltigkeit zurückgehender, in sich ruhender Musik folgte impulsive jugendliche Frische mit Felix Mendelssohn Bartoldys erstem Violinkonzert. Jenes d-Moll-Konzert ist Werk eines 13-Jährigen und längst nicht so präsent in den Konzertsälen wie das reichlich zwei Jahrzehnte später entstandene Schwesterwerk in e-Moll. Doch scheint die Meisterschaft des Komponisten allenthalben durch, und dank der Musizierlust und Ernsthaftigkeit, mit der sich sowohl Daniel Hope als auch die Camerata Salzburg des Werkes annahmen, entfaltete es all seine Reize. Die lagen nicht nur in den sprühenden Ecksätzen, sondern ebenso im langsamen Mittelsatz, in dem Orchester und Solist – die ohne vermittelnden Dirigenten musizierten – mit ausgesprochen sorgsamen, subtilen Phrasierungen glänzten.

Mit Mozarts Violinkonzert G-Dur KV 216 legte der brillante Daniel Hope nach der Pause gleich noch einmal nach. Seine Guaneri mit ihrem großen, blumigen Ton wurde quasi eins mit dem Kirchenraum, den sie spielend leicht erfüllte und erfühlte. Ein charmantes Allegro mit einer vom Solisten in tiefer, überlegener Ruhe vorgetragenen Kadenz, ein fast entrückt wirkendes Adagio und ein Schloss-Rondo voller Esprit rundeten sich zu einer stimmigen, begeistert aufgenommenen Interpretation. Das forderte eine Zugabe, in der der britische Geiger eine Lanze für den 1656 in Dresden geborenen Johann Paul von Westhoff brach. Der Geiger und Komponist, u.a. auch Mitglied der Dresdner Hofkapelle, sei Wegbereiter für Bachs berühmte Violin-Sonaten und -Partiten gewesen – “Es sollte in Dresden eine Von-Westhoff-Straße geben”, meinte Hope, bevor er gemeinsam mit dem Orchester die wirkungsvolle “Imitazione delle campane” in einer Bearbeitung von Christian Badzura zum Besten gab.

Joseph Haydns Sinfonie Nr. 7 C-Dur – “Le Midi” – wurde am Ende noch einmal Spielwiese für ein hervorragendes Orchester, das mit Lust und Hochspannung und im besten Sinne gemeinsam ein großes Ganzes formt. Hatte schon in den Violinkonzerten jeder einzelne Tuttist förmlich so musiziert, als wäre er mindestens Trio-Partner des Solisten, so zeichnete die gleiche Aufmerksamkeit auch das reine Orchesterspiel aus. Angeführt von Konzertmeister Gregory Ahss zauberte das Ensemble eine technisch wie gestisch genau ausgefeilte Aufführung, was allein noch nicht zwingend reichen muss, um den Hörer tatsächlich zu fesseln, hier aber dank Stringenz, Energie und Tiefenschärfe höchste Güte erlangte.

Sybille Graf




  all concert reviews

PRESS REVIEWS



2014


Das war meine Rettung
Zeit Magazin, 01.10.2014

Einen Traum erfüllt: Daniel Hope und sein Hollywood-Album
hr2-Kultur, 02.10.2014

Was macht man, wenn die Tage wieder kürzer werden und es draußen ungemütlich wird? “Weg von hier”, mag sich der eine oder andere da denken. Da kommt das neue Album von Daniel Hope gerade richtig: “Escape to Paradise” heißt es, ein Hollywood-Album, für das der Stargeiger Musik aufgenommen hat, die beispielhaft ist für den Sound, der die Bilder aus der Traumfabrik seit Jahrzehnten so eindrucksvoll ergänzt.

 

Erschienen ist die CD bei der Deutschen Grammophon, mit Werken von Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Hanns Eisler und Kurt Weill bis hin zu Filmmusik aus Casablanca, Ben Hur, Schindlers Liste oder American Beauty.

Wer Daniel Hope kennt, der weiß, dass er für fantasievolle, ja fantastische Projekte steht, in die er viel Kreativität und Herzblut steckt. Diesmal hat er Musik von Exil-Komponisten aufgenommen, die in der Traumfabrik von Los Angeles gestrandet waren und dort den “Hollywood-Sound” kreierten – ein Klang mit Geschichte und vor allem aus Geschichten. Einzelschicksale, Träume, in Klänge verpackt, und großes, menschliches Kino.

2 Jahre Recherche

Zwei Jahre hat Daniel Hope für sein Album recherchiert. Er stöberte in den Archiven der Paramount Studios und dabei wurde klar, dass in vielen Kompositionen der Gedanke der Flucht mitspielte, das Zurücklassen alter Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft. Auf seiner CD spannt Daniel Hope einen Bogen von dem jungen Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis hin zu Komponisten, die zwar keine Flüchtlinge mehr waren, deren Musik sich aber auf eigene Weise mit dem Thema Flucht beschäftigt: So ist z.B. John Williams‘ Musik zu Schindlers Liste dabei, oder auch das Love Theme aus Cinema Paradiso von Ennio Morricone.

Hollywood schreibt auch Musikgeschichte

Der Hollywood-Sound vom Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten bis heute – mit “Escape to Paradise” ist es Daniel Hope gelungen, den Fokus auf das zu richten, was sonst eher hinter opulenten Bildern verschwindet: denn die Filmindustrie der Traumfabrik hat auch musikalisch Geschichte geschrieben.

Wie waren die Hörgewohnheiten der Komponisten, die aus Europa nach L.A. kamen? Und welchen Einfluss hatten sie auf die Soundtracks von heute? Überflüssig zu sagen, dass es Daniel Hope bei aller Leidenschaft zu vermeiden weiß, sich der Gefühlsduselei hinzugeben. Mit seinem Album verwandelt er sich in einen Regisseur, der zeigt, dass Hollywood mehr ist als eine wunderschöne Kulisse. Mit seiner wandlungsfähigen Geige führt Hope die unterschiedlichsten Bilder vor Augen. Dazu tragen auch Sting, Max Raabe und all die anderen Musiker bei, die bei “Escape to Paradise” mitgewirkt haben, außerdem reizvolle Arrangements, die manchen bekannten Titel in einem ganz neuen Gewand präsentieren, und ein biegsames Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. Mit diesem Album dürfte sich Daniel Hope einen Traum erfüllt haben – und nicht nur sich!

Von Adelheid Kleine

Escape to Paradise
Gramophone, 15.10.2014

Als den Eltern auf der Flucht das Geld ausging
Sonntagszeitung, 28.09.2014

von Christian Hubschmid

 «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie»: Daniel Hope, 41
Der blaue Siegelring an seinem rechten kleinen Finger leuchtet wie das Meer. Bald muss Daniel Hope auf die Bühne, doch hat er noch schnell Zeit für ein Interview. «Es entspannt mich», sagt der 41-jährige Geiger. Und bittet in seine Künstlergarderobe in der Alten Oper Frankfurt.

«Das Siegel zeigt das Familienwappen meiner Grossmutter», sagt der Brite Hope in perfektem Deutsch. Die Geschichte seiner Familie ist die Geschichte einer mehrmaligen Flucht. Zwar trat die Familie schon im 19. Jahrhundert vom Judentum zum Christentum über, trotzdem wurde Hopes Grossvater 1934 in seiner Heimatstadt Berlin auf offener Strasse ­zusammengeschlagen. Sofort entschied sich der Grossvater, fortzugehen. Nach Südafrika. Von wo später auch Hopes Vater fliehen musste. Als Apartheid-Gegner in den Siebzigerjahren.

Es ist deshalb kein Zufall, dass Daniel Hope nach dem Interview das Violinkonzert des jüdischen Exilanten Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897–1957) spielen wird. Wobei «spielen» eine Untertreibung ist. Hope lässt das Stück knallen, bringt es zur Explosion wie ein Feuerwerk. Und danach wird man sich fragen: Korngold? Warum kennt man diesen fantastischen Komponisten nicht?

 Musik von Komponisten,  die vor den Nazis flüchteten

«Weil Korngold nach seiner Flucht Filmmusik für Hollywood geschrieben hat», sagt Daniel Hope. Zwei Oscars hat er bekommen, nachdem er in den Dreissigerjahren nach Hollywood emigriert war. Erst nach Hitlers Tod konnte er die Orchestermusik schreiben, die er eigentlich schreiben wollte. So erging es ihm wie vielen Flüchtlingen, deren Musik Daniel Hope auf seiner neuen CD «Escape to Paradise» wiederaufleben lässt.

Es ist Musik von Komponisten, die vor den Nazis in die USA flüchteten. Und es ist «nur» Filmmusik. Doch Daniel Hope macht keinen Unterschied zur zweckfreien Kunst. Die Komponisten hätten ein neues Medium mitgeschaffen, sagt Hope: den Soundtrack zum Tonfilm, den es erst seit wenigen Jahren gab. Die Filmfabrik Hollywood engagierte die europäischen Flüchtlinge mit Handkuss. Wenn sie auch nicht alle glücklich machte. Denn Musik am Fliessband zu schreiben, ist nicht jedermanns Ding. Doch sie komponierten «meisterhaft», schwärmt Hope.

Daniel Hope ist einer der wichtigsten Geiger der Gegenwart. Heute Sonntag wird er in Zürich auf der Bühne stehen, am Eröffnungskonzert des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO). Hope ist in der Saison 2014/15 Artist-in-Residence dieses renommierten Orchesters. Er sei mit dem ZKO seit seiner frühesten Kindheit verbunden, erzählt er. Jeden Sommer habe er als Kind in Gstaad verbracht, wo das ZKO jeweils am Menuhin Festival auftrat. «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie», sagt Hope. Und das kam so.

Daniel Hopes Vater, der Schriftsteller Christopher Hope, wurde vom Apartheid-Regime in Südafrika beschattet, weil er sich gegen die Rassentrennung engagierte. Als auch das Telefon abgehört und er bedroht wurde, floh die Familie Hals über Kopf. Erst nach Frankreich, dann nach London.

Mit 27 jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio

«Hier ging uns das Geld aus», erzählt Daniel Hope lachend. Es war vielleicht sein grosses Glück. Denn nun suchte die Mutter einen Job und wurde Sekretärin des grossen Geigers Menuhin. 26 Jahre lang blieb sie an dessen Seite, die meiste Zeit als seine Managerin. Und Daniel Hope verbrachte seine Sommerferien am Menuhin Festival in Gstaad, dem berühmten Virtuosen lauschend, der oft mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester spielte. Das letzte Konzert, das Menuhin als Geiger gab, erlebte Hope in der Kirche von Saanen mit.

Und er wurde selber Geiger. Einer der besten der Welt. Mit 27 war er jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio. Heute kann er sich aussuchen, mit welchen Orchestern und Dirigenten er auftreten will. Er arbeitet auch mit Popkünstlern wie Sting zusammen und veröffentlicht Bücher, von denen jenes über seine Familiengeschichte, «Familienstücke», ein Bestseller wurde.

Was kein Wunder ist, wenn man diese Geschichte kennt. Denn auch Hopes Urgrossmutter war seinerzeit 1939 aus Berlin nach Südafrika geflohen. Nur der Urgrossvater schaffte es nicht. Er nahm sich in Berlin das Leben. Als deutscher Patriot ertrug er den Gedanken, aus seiner Heimat fliehen zu müssen, nicht.

Daniel Hope steht auf und nimmt seine Geige zur Hand. Er sagt, Musik könne die Welt nicht verändern. «Aber sie ist eine Chance, ein Gespräch anzufangen. Und wir können die Katastrophen dieser Welt nur mit Gesprächen aufhalten.»

Dann geht er auf die Bühne.

Daniel Hope spielt heute mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester Werke von Mozart.  Zürich, Tonhalle, 19 Uhr

Der Sound von Hollywood
Crescendo, 22.09.2014

Escape to Paradise
BR-Klassik, 22.09.2014

Der Geiger Daniel Hope, geboren 1973 in Südafrika, spricht nicht nur fließend Deutsch. Er ist auch bekannt für seine Vielseitigkeit und seine ausgefallenen Programm, die niemals nur unterhaltsam sein wollen sondern meist eine inhaltliche Botschaft haben.

Schon beim CD-Cover fällt auf: Alles ist hier irgendwie nostalgisch geraten. Und eigentlich müsste der Schriftzug im Hintergrund noch “HollywoodLand” heißen – wie zu jenen Zeiten, von denen diese CD erzählt. Es ist die große Ära der europäischen Emigranten. Die Ära des Holocaust. Und der Focus dieses Filmmusik-Album liegt auf jenen jüdisch-europäischen Exilanten, ohne die es den später so genannten “Hollywood Sound” vermutlich nie gegeben hätte: Miklos Rozsa, Franz Waxman und erst recht Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Schwelgerischer als Heifetz

Korngolds Violinkonzert op.35 ist das ausladendste und sicherlich prominenteste Werk dieser CD; ein Werk, das einerseits eng verknüpft ist mit den Soundtracks großer Errol Flynn-Streifen wie “Another Dawn” oder “Der Prinz und der Bettelknabe”, das andererseits aber längst ins feste Repertoire großer Geiger gehört, seit Jascha Heifetz das Werk auf der Konzertbühne uraufführte. Daniel Hopes Interpretation ist deutlich schwelgerischer als diejenige von Heifetz, und sie ist – wie fast alle Darbietungen dieser CD – durchdrungen von Hopes Sendungsbewusstsein. Ihm geht es um jene Botschaft abseits des glamourösen Hollywood-Emblems und um die Aufdeckung durchaus tragischer Begleitumstände, die zu dieser Musik geführt haben.

Begnadeter Geigeninterpret und verbaler Mittler

Der scheinbar beschwingte Walzer aus “Come back, little Sheba” beispielsweise wurde von dem Mann komponiert, den 1934 die Nazis in Berlin auf offener Straße zusammenschlugen und der dann über Paris in die USA emigrierte: Franz Wachsmann, der sich später “Waxman” nannte. Und wenn an anderer Stelle Max Raabes wohlvertraute Nostalgiestimme erklingt, nämlich in Kurt Weills “Speak Low”, dann erhält auch das plötzlich ein ganz anderes Gewicht – dank der Person Daniel Hopes, der hier wieder einmal in einer Doppelrolle agiert: als begnadeter Geigeninterpret und im Begleitheft als verbaler Mittler.
Ein durchaus nachdenklich stimmendes Hollywood-Album!

Von: Matthias Keller

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 09.09.2014

Der Geiger und Forscher Daniel Hope erinnert an jüdische Emigranten, die mit Filmmusik eine neue Existenz aufbauten.

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben

Es muss ein Thriller sein
Gala, 04.09.2014



2013


Spheres
Bayern Klassik, www.br.de, 13.02.2013

Eine Auswahl sinneserweiternder, meditativer, melodiöser Musik wird auf der CD-Rückseite angekündigt. Eine Zeitreise vom Barock bis in die Gegenwart. Und eine Sternenreise: Die Musikzusammenstellung erklärt Daniel Hope mit seiner Faszination für den Nachthimmel, für die Weite des Universums.
Autor: Ben Alber Stand: 13.02.2013

 

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? – diese Frage verbinde die Musik auf seiner CD, so Hope im Booklet. Mit einer atmosphärisch dichten Bearbeitung einer Solo-Sonate des Barockkomponisten Johann Paul von Westhoff beginnt meine Sternenreise an der Seite von Daniel Hope. Ein erster Blick in den Nachthimmel, es glitzert silbrig, ich hebe langsam ab und freue mich auf den Flug. Dann “I giorni” von Ludovico Einaudi, ein Stück, das es vor nicht langer Zeit in die britischen Single-Charts brachte und in einige Werbespots – zum Beispiel in den eines indischen Telekommunikations-Anbieters.Und da passt es sicher auch gut. Die Botschaft auf “Spheres” vielleicht: “Ja, da draußen ist irgendetwas, ein ganzer Haufen Telekommunikationssatelliten!”

Konzeptalbum mit rotem Faden

Ich vertraue meinem Reiseleiter und bleibe an seiner Seite. Ich gebe zu, die Versuchung war groß, zur Erde zurückzukehren. Aber ich werde für meine Toleranz belohnt: Je länger die Reise dauert, desto mehr erschließt sich Hopes Idee, dem die Reihenfolge der Stücke auf der CD sehr wichtig ist. Nämlich die Idee eines geschlossenen Konzeptalbums, das inhaltlich und klanglich ein roter Faden durchzieht, und das doch auch immer wieder überrascht. Gerade mit zahlreichen Miniaturen jüngerer Komponisten: Max Richter, Alex Baranowski, und Gabriel Prokofiev, der Enkel von Sergeij Prokofiev, haben unter anderem Stücke geliefert, die überzeugen. Prokofiev ist es, der mit seinem “Spheres” am deutlichsten eine Projektionsfläche bietet für die Ängste, die auch Platz haben bei einer (Gedanken-)Reise ins Universum: Wenn da draußen etwas ist – ist es uns auch wohlgesonnen?

 

Ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel

Neben einem ganzen Reigen eingängiger Geigen-Melodien – mal im zarten Duo mit Klavier, mal in weichen Streicherklang gebettet, mal pompös orchestral und vokal aufgeladen – hat auch das unheimliche schwarze Nichts zwischen den glitzernden Sternen immer mal seinen Platz auf dieser CD. Und das ist gut so. Trotz Mars-Mobil und Raumstation bleibt das Universum doch ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel. Schade, wenn das in der Musik anders wäre.

Spheres – Daniel Hope
www.klassikerleben.de, 14.02.2013

Es ist eine Zusammenstellung von Miniaturen, aber auch etwas längeren Sätzen, die an stilistischer Bandbreite kaum zu überbieten ist. In seiner offenen und stets auf Unentdecktes neugierigen Art forscht der Geiger und künstlerische Leiter der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Daniel Hope, mit dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin unter Leitung von Simon Halsey und bei einigen Tracks sogar unterstützt vom Rundfunkchor Berlin in deutschem, italienischem, amerikanischem und russischem Repertoire nach wahren Pretiosen für sein Instrument. Viele Tracks stammen vom italienischen Filmmusikkomponisten Ludovico Einaudi. Dann werden Ausschnitte aus den berühmten, im John-Neumeier-Ballett „Preludes CV“ auch vertanzten 24 Präludien für Violine und Klavier der russisch-amerikanischen Komponistin Lera Auerbach mit Arrangements von barocken Bach-Präludien oder Genrestücken des Amerikaners Karl Jenkins kombiniert. Selbst Minimalistisches von Philipp Glass oder Michael Nyman findet sich in dieser aparten Sammlung von Violinwerken. Nicht vom großen Sergej, sondern vom jungen Gabriel Prokofjew stammt der Titel „Spheres“. Überhaupt stellen viele Werke ganz junger Komponisten auf Hopes jüngstem Album echte Überraschungen dar, so etwa das Stück „Biafra“ vom 1983 geborenen Alex Baranowski oder das Lento des 1973 geborenen Aleksey Igudesman. Eine Entdeckung ist auch der von John Rutter arrangierte „Cantique de Jean Racine“ op. 11 von Gabriel Fauré.
(Deutsche Grammophon/Universal Music)

(Helmut Peters)

 

Heaven and Hell
, 14.02.2013

Toms Schmankerl der Woche

Vom Sphärenklang zum Untergang mit Tom Asam.

 

Der britische Violinist Daniel Hope ist gefeierter Solist und Kammermusiker und darüber hinaus für seine Vielseitigkeit bekannt. Da gibt es schon mal ein Crossover-Projekt mit Sting. Oder wie zuletzt in der Recomposed Serie der Deutschen Grammophon (bei der er seit 2007 exklusiv veröffentlicht) frisches Blut für Vivaldi durch Max Richters gelungene Re-Interpretation der Vier Jahreszeiten. Nun erscheint Spheres, eine musikalische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema Sphärenklänge. Spätestens seit Pythagoras beschäftigen sich Philosophen, Mathematiker und Musiker mit der Vorstellung, dass die Bewegung der Planeten einen Klang erzeugt, dass Musik eine mathematische Grundlage hat, eine Art astronomische Harmonie, die in allem stecke. Hope nimmt sich dieser so romantischen wie faszinierenden Idee an und spannt dabei einen musikalischen Bogen von der Renaissance bis in die Gegenwart, von Westhoff (dessen Einfluss auf Bach er für unterschätzt hält) über Fauré und Glass bis Arvo Pärt, Einaudi und Nyman. Hinzu kommen Ersteinspielungen von Stücken der Komponisten Alex Baranowksi, Gabriel Prokofieff, Alexej Igudesmann und Karsten Gundermann. Eine bezaubernde Idee, die von Hope u.a. mit Jaques Ammon (Piano), dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin und Mitgliedern des Rundfunkorchesters Berlin phantastisch umgesetzt wurde. Ideal, um öfter mal die Bildschirme ausgeschaltet zu lassen und zum Klang dieser Sphärenmusiken in den Nachthimmel zu glotzen. Mein persönlicher Favorit ist Arvo Pärts Fratres – ein Stück, bei dem die Ganzkörper-Gänsehaut in ihrer Heftigkeit im Wettstreit mit den Freudentränen liegt. Galaktisch.

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? Daniel Hope verzaubert mit seiner Geige: CD „Spheres“
The Epoch Times, 28.02.2013

“Komponisten und Werke aus verschiedenen Jahrhunderten zusammenbringen, die man normalerweise nicht in derselben Galaxie findet“, so umschrieb Daniel Hope das Konzept seines neuen Albums, das jüngst bei der Deutschen Grammophon erschienen ist. Der verbindende Gedanke hinter der Musik von „Spheres“ sei die Frage: „Ist da draußen irgendetwas?“

Astronomie fasziniert den britischen Geiger Daniel Hope seit Kindheitstagen und Sternenbeobachtung war neben der Musik seine große Leidenschaft. Da konnte es nicht ausbleiben, dass Hope ein „zeitgemäßes Statement“ zur Sphärenmusik abgeben wollte, jenem seit Urzeiten beschriebenen, selbsterzeugten Klang der Planeten.

Dass „Spheres“ als Konzeptalbum kein Marketing-Gag, sondern eine echte Entdeckungsreise ist, merkt der Hörer spätestens am filigranen Tonfall der CD und ihrer eigenwilligen Zusammenstellung. „Spheres“ vereint musikalische Organismen aus vier Jahrhunderten, ohne nach dem „E“ oder „U“ ihrer Herkunft zu fragen. Und „Spheres“ ist eine jener Sammlungen geworden, die man sehr oft hören kann, ohne dass sie ihren Glanz verliert. Das liegt vor allem an der Qualität der Stücke und ihrer Interpretation, fünf davon sind Weltersteinspielungen, andere speziell neu arrangiert. Sogar Filmmusiken wurden ihrem Entstehungskontext entführt und fanden auf dem Planeten „Kammermusik“ ein neues Zuhause; wegen der Hingabe aller Beteiligten ein künstlerisch glaubwürdiges zumal.

Zu Hopes superbem Geigenspiel gesellen sich Jacques Ammon am Klavier, das Deutsche Kammerorchester Berlin unter Simon Halsey mit kongenialen und ebenbürtigen Streichersolisten, sogar Mitglieder des Rundfunkchores Berlin. Das Klangspektrum, das Daniel Hope seiner Guaneri entlockt, ist faszinierend: Er haucht, singt, schwelgt, spricht mit den Anderen oder ist einsamer Sucher, täuscht Sordinoklänge an, um im nächsten Moment zu vollem Sound aufzublühen, ist Seele der Handlung ohne je selbstgefälliger Virtuose zu sein.

Die CD „Spheres“ hat eine intelligente Dramaturgie, die von einer Ausnahme abgesehen, nahtlos fließt. Sie beginnt mit Bach-Vorläufer Johann Paul von Westhoff („Imitazione delle campane“, ca.1690) in geheimnisvollem Arpeggio-Geflüster und schließt im Heute mit dem fragenden Monolog einer Geige vor dunkler Orchester-Wolkenwand (Karsten Gundermanns „Faust – Episode 2 – Nachspiel“). Zwischen die vielen kurzen Stücke fügt sich „Fratres“, ein rund zwölfminütiger und atemberaubender Arvo Pärt. Ludovico Enaudis „I giorni“ und „Passaggio“ entpuppen sich als wahre Perlen. Karl Jenkins „Benedictus“ wird zum rührenden Dialog von Geige und Chor, der in großem Pathos gipfelt, das hier jedoch zarter und zerbrechlicher als im Original erklingt. Das dreieinhalbminütige Herzstück „Spheres“ von Gabriel Prokofiev behandelt als atonalste Komposition das Thema der Planetenbewegung als sich mechanisch verschiebende Stimmen, zwischen denen Harmonie und Dissonanz entsteht.

Alles ist wunderbar stimmig, bis auf ein Kuschelklassik-Ei, das sich Hope laut Booklet mit voller Absicht selbst gelegt hat: Es ist der „Cantique de Jean Racine“ von Gabriel Fauré, den er während seiner Schulzeit öfter gesungen hat und ereilt den Hörer auf Track 4: Nachdem die Gehörgänge gerade mit minimalistischen Achtelbewegungen von Philip Glass massiert wurden und man langsam in die subtile Klangwelt der CD hineingeschwebt ist, wirkt das spätromantische Chorwerk mit seinen Schmelzklängen und weihnachtlichem Charakter süßlich triefend und wie Creme Bruleé auf nüchternen Magen – obwohl es beispielhaft gesungen ist! Zu allem Überfluss schweigt hier die erwartete Solovioline, mit deren ätherischen Flageoletts es danach weitergeht, als wäre nichts gewesen. Der einzige Ausreißer auf der sonst sehr schlüssigen CD „Spheres“.

„Spheres“ dürfte ein Verkaufserfolg werden, weil das Album Heiterkeit ausstrahlt, die sanft vitalisierend wirkt und sich für alle Lebenslagen eignet. Und auch besonders für Menschen, die nachts absichtlich wachbleiben um Sterne zu beobachten oder Musik zu hören.

Rosemarie Frühauf

Mit Daniel Hope in den Kosmos schweben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 02.03.2013

von Ernst Strobl

Im Fernsehprogramm wird er so angekündigt: „Einer der besten Geiger der Welt ist Daniel Hope. Bereits mit elf Jahren trat der britische Musiker mit Yehudi Menuhin auf, der ihn einmal als seinen musikalischen Enkel bezeichnete. Über 100 Konzerte gibt Daniel Hope jedes Jahr, immer mit dabei ist seine Guarneri-Geige von 1742 . . .“ Okay, er ist Geiger, aber das ist längst nicht al les. Daniel Hope ist wohl so etwas wie ein Tausendsassa. Neben der weltumspannenden Konzerttätigkeit ist er seit zehn Jahren Künstlerischer Leiter des Savannah Musical Festivals in Georgia, sein Amt als Künstlerischer Direktor des Festivals Mecklenburg-Vorpommern legt er heuer nach vielen Jahren nieder.

Und natürlich nimmt Hope CDs auf. Soeben ist eine der faszinierendsten Aufnahmen der jüngeren Zeit erschienen, mit denen Hope die Hörer wahrhaft in höhere Sphären entführt. Ihn an seinem neuen Wohnsitz Wien anzutreffen, ist nicht einfach. Vor ein paar Tagen passte es. Hope kam eben von Konzerten aus den USA zurück, wo er auch den 89-jährigen Pianisten Menahem Pressler besuchte, der ihn vor Jahren zum Beaux Arts Trio geholt hatte. Es folgte ein Abend mit Klaus Maria Brandauer in Zürich, Wien diente zum Umsteigen nach Göteborg, wo er am Donnerstag mit dem Britten-Violinkonzert bejubelt wurde. Heute, Samstag, ist Hope im SWR Fernsehen zu sehen.

„Spheres“ ist der Titel der CD, ist das was für Esoteriker? Ja, das habe er gern, sagt Hope. Es sei eine schöne Vorstellung, dass Planeten bei ihrer „Begegnung“ Sphärenklänge erzeugten. Hörbarer funktioniert das auf der Geige, wo Reibung Töne erzeugt. Und was für welche! Hope achtete auf die Dramaturgie bei der Auswahl der 18 Stücke. Begleitet vom Dirigenten Simon Hal sey, Kammerorchester, Chor oder Klavier zieht er fragile, innige oder glänzende Fäden über fast filmische Musik vom Barock über Phil Glass bis zu Arvo Pärt, Lera Auerbach und Ludovico Einaudi. Eine intensive, geglückte Entdeckungsreise – auch ohne Sternenhimmel zum Rauf- und Runterhören schön.

CD. Daniel Hope, „Spheres“, u. a. mit Jacques Ammon, Klavier, Deutsches Kammerorchester Berlin, Rundfunkchor Berlin. Deutsche Grammophon. TV. Daniel Hope zu Gast bei Frank Elstner. SWR, Samstag, 21.50 Uhr.

Wien ist ein Rückzugsort
Wiener Zeitung, 11.04.2013

Stargeiger und Entertainer Daniel Hope ist weltweit unterwegs und in Wien zu Hause

Von Daniel Wagner

Was dem Stargeiger und Wahlwiener Daniel Hope an seinem Wohnsitz gefällt.

Wien. Frühstück im Dritten. Kann eine Stadt inspirieren? Daniel Hope stimmt zu. Hier kann er alles aufsaugen, die Vergangenheit ist so gegenwärtig wie nirgendwo anders. Wobei die Besonderheit für den Stargeiger die Mischung macht. Wien sei eindeutig ein Schmelztiegel, mitten in Europa, die Nähe zum Balkan, die türkische Vergangenheit. Bei allen Unterschieden verwenden dennoch alle irgendwie die gleiche Sprache. “Abgesehen davon bin ich wahrscheinlich der weltgrößte Fan von Jugendstil”, sagt Hope und lacht.

Natürlich kann Wien für einen Musiker das Zentrum der Welt sein. Allein wenn er durch die City geht und Gedenktafeln von Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven bis zurück zu Vivaldi seinen Weg kreuzen, kann er nur staunen.

Journalistische Triebkräfte
Hat Wien für ihn nicht zu musealen Charakter? Der medial erfahrene Publikumsliebling schüttelt den Kopf. Durch das Wissen um die kulturelle Vergangenheit habe gerade hierzulande die Kultur einen besonderen Stellenwert inne. Denn in der gegenwärtigen Krise wird weltweit bekanntlich zuerst an der Kultur gespart. Zwei Ausnahmen fallen nach Hope hier auf: Deutschland und besonders Österreich, wo die Wertschätzung den Kunstschaffenden gegenüber vorbildlich sei.

Apropos Deutschland: Die Fernsehlandschaft der Nachbarn erkor ihn in den letzten Jahren gerne zum moderierenden Musiker. Klassik erklärt aus dem Mund des Praktikers. Wie wurde man auf seine Entertainer-Qualitäten aufmerksam? Dass er journalistische Triebkräfte hat, wurde ihm schon als Herausgeber der Schulzeitung im südafrikanischen Durban bewusst. Dann das eigentliche Geschäft: Yehudi Menuhin förderte ihn während und nach dem Studium am Londoner Royal College of Music. 2002 folgte er dem Ruf des immer umtriebigen Menahem Pressler (unlängst gab der 89-jährige Pianist sein Wiener Solodebüt). Hope wurde der letzte Geiger des legendären Beaux Arts Trios. Woran er bei dem Ensemblegründer denkt? “Wenn Pressler spielt, ist er einfach Musik. Dieses Gefühl kann nur er verbreiten.” Daneben die internationale Solokarriere. Zum Fernsehen kam er aus purem Zufall. Ein Regisseur bei Arte bat ihn während Dreharbeiten, nicht nur zu spielen, sondern auch zu moderieren. Und es hat Spaß gemacht.

Immer wieder Wien. Auch persönliche Gründe zogen ihn hierher, lebt doch die Mutter seit 20 Jahren mit ihrem zweiten Mann, dem Sänger Benno Schollum, in der Stadt. So schließt sich der Kreis zur komplexen Familienhistorie, Hope bezieht sich väterlicherseits auf katholisch-irische Vorfahren, mütterlicherseits führen die Wurzeln ganz deutlich nach Wien. Genauso wie nach Berlin. Die deutsch-jüdische Provenienz wurde der Familie zum Verhängnis. Ribbentrop persönlich enteignete einen Urgroßvater und machte dessen Berliner Villa zur Dechiffrierstation der Nazis. Der andere, seines Zeichens erfolgreicher Journalist, begrüßte den Machtwechsel. Bis er merkte, dass er “Volljude” war und Selbstmord beging. Der Urenkel feiert im heutigen Deutschland große Erfolge. Gibt es Schatten der Vergangenheit? “Ich liebe das Land, arbeite gerne dort, aber Wien gibt mir die nötige Distanz zur Familiengeschichte.”

“Ich habe das Gefühl, dass oft 300 verschiedene Projekte gleichzeitig durch meinen Kopf schwirren. Ich schnappe etwas auf, manches liegt Jahrzehnte, vieles wird verwirklicht.” Beispielsweise sein unlängst veröffentlichten Album “Spheres”: Schon als Kind liebt er sein Teleskop, über Yehudi Menuhin lernte er den US-Astronomen Carl Sagan kennen und erfuhr von Sphärenmusik, neulich hörte er eine Radiosendung darüber, und währenddessen entstand das Konzept für die Aufnahmen. Es ist Musik zum Ausspannen, fernab des tagtäglichen Wahnsinns. “Wo wir doch so klein in der Milchstraße sind, müssen wir uns die begründete Frage stellen, was es noch da draußen gibt.”

What’s Still Timeless About ‘Seasons’
The Wall Street Journal, 23.08.2013

By DANIEL HOPE – I first experienced Vivaldi as a toddler at Yehudi Menuhin’s festival in Gstaad, Switzerland, in 1975. One day I heard what I thought was birdsong coming from the stage. It was the opening solo of “La Primavera” from the “Four Seasons.” It had such an electrifying effect that I still call it my “Vivaldi Spring.” How was it possible to conjure up so vivid, so natural a sound, with just a violin?

Opinions of Vivaldi divide between those who adore and those who despise him. Ask the average person if he recognizes a classical melody, however poorly hummed, and he will probably nod enthusiastically at the second theme of “Spring” from the “Four Seasons.” On the other hand, Igor Stravinsky summed up the case for the other side when he quipped, “Vivaldi wrote one concerto, 400 times.”

Yes, Vivaldi was incredibly prolific. Nonetheless, his most famous work remains his “Four Seasons.” To understand this masterpiece, it helps to shed a little light on the rise and fall of one of the greatest violinists of the 18th century. Born in Venice in 1678 into a desperately poor family, Vivaldi chose the priesthood early on—it offered good chances of advancement. But his plans were scuppered when his severe asthma meant that he was unable to conduct long masses and because, gossip has it, he would nip out for a glass of something during the sermon.

What changed his life forever was an unusual job offer. In 1703 a Venetian orphanage, the Ospedale della Pietà, which provided musical training to the illegitimate and abandoned young daughters of wealthy noblemen, asked Vivaldi to direct its orchestra. Vivaldi understood immediately that he had a unique ensemble at his disposal. Many of his greatest works were written for these young ladies to perform. Very soon, all Europe was enthralled.

He remained there for 12 years and, after an itinerant period working in Vicenza and Mantua, returned to Venice in 1723. The 1720s were a difficult time. The bursting of the “South Sea Bubble” triggered a recession that spread across Europe. Vivaldi needed an income. So in 1723 he set about writing a series of works he boldly titled “Il Cimento dell’ Armonia e dell’invenzione” (“The trial of harmony and invention”), Opus 8. It consists of 12 concerti, seven of which—”Spring,” “Summer,” “Autumn” and “Winter” (which make up the “Four Seasons”), “Pleasure,” “The Hunt” and “Storm at Sea”—paint astonishingly vivid, vibrant scenes. In “Storm at Sea,” Vivaldi reached a new level of virtuosity, pushing technical mastery to the limit as the violinist’s fingers leap and shriek across the fingerboard, recalling troubled waters.

In the score, each of the four seasons are prefaced by four sonnets, possibly Vivaldi’s own, that establish each concerto as a musical image of that season. At the top of every movement, Vivaldi gives us a written description of what we are about to hear. These range from “the blazing sun’s relentless heat, men and flocks are sweltering” (“Summer”) to peasant celebrations (“Autumn”) in which “the cup of Bacchus flows freely, and many find their relief in deep slumber.” Images of warmth and wine are wonderfully intertwined. When the faithful hound “barks” in the slow movement of “Spring,” we experience it just as clearly as the patter of raindrops on the roof in the largo of “Winter.” No composer of the time got music to sing, speak and depict quite like this.

Vivaldi’s fame spread. He received commissions from King Louis XV of France and Rome’s Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni. When Prince Johann Ernst returned to his court at Weimar from an Italian tour, he brought with him a selection of Vivaldi’s earlier, 12-concerto “L’Estro Armonico” (“Harmonic Inspiration”) and presented it to the young organist Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach was so taken with the music that he rearranged several of the concertos for different instrumentation. A legend was born. Johann Friedrich Armand von Uffenbach exclaimed: “Vivaldi played a solo accompaniment—splendid—to which he appended a cadenza which really frightened me, for such playing has never been nor can be: he brought his fingers up to only a straw’s distance from the bridge, leaving no room for the bow—and that on all four strings with imitations and incredible speed.”

But Vivaldi’s fame was eventually to become his greatest enemy. People said that “Il Prete rosso” (“the red priest,” due to his flowing red locks) was surely in league with the devil—seducing those poor defenseless orphans, whose corsets he untied with a mere flick of his bow. The pope threatened him with excommunication. Suddenly, he was out of fashion. Once again he was broke. In May 1740, he headed to Vienna, where Emperor Charles VI had once offered him a position. He died there a year later, and was buried in a pauper’s grave.

Centuries passed. Dust gathered on the red priest’s music. A revival of sorts began when scholars in Dresden began to uncover Vivaldi manuscripts in the 1920s. But what really redeemed him was the record industry. Alfredo Campoli released a live recording of the “Four Seasons” in 1939. But, at least indirectly, the greatest revival of the “Seasons” occurred thanks to Hollywood. Louis Kaufman, an American violinist and concertmaster for more than 400 movie soundtracks, including “Gone With the Wind” and “Cleopatra,” recorded the “Four Seasons” for the Concert Hall Society. It won the 1950 Grand Prix du Disque.

Today the “Four Seasons,” with more than 1,000 available recordings, are not just rediscovered—they are being reimagined. Astor Piazzolla, Uri Caine, Philip Glass and others have all created their own versions. In Spring 2012, I received an enigmatic call from the British composer Max Richter, who said he wanted to “recompose” the “Four Seasons” for me. His problem, he explained, was not with the music, but how we have treated it. We are subjected to it in supermarkets, elevators or when a caller puts you on hold. Like many of us, he was deeply fond of the “Seasons” but felt a degree of irritation at the music’s ubiquity. He told me that because Vivaldi’s music is made up of regular patterns, it has affinities with the seriality of contemporary postminimalism, one style in which he composes. Therefore, he said, the moment seemed ideal to reimagine a new way of hearing it.

I had always shied away from recording Vivaldi’s original. There are simply too many other versions already out there. But Mr. Richter’s reworking meant listening again to what is constantly new in a piece we think we are hearing when, really, we just blank it out. The album, “Recomposed By Max Richter: Four Seasons,” was released late last year. With his old warhorse refitted for the 21st century, the inimitable red priest rides again.

article appeared August 23, 2013, on page C13 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal



  all press reviews

BOOKS

Buch

toi toi toi

Was tut ein Pianist, wenn ihm mitten im Konzert vor ausverkauftem Haus plötzlich der Flügel wegrollt? Wie reagiert ein Geiger, dem während seines Auftritts eine Saite reißt? Wie soll ein Dirigent sich verhalten, wenn beim Konzert in der vordersten Reihe …

  read more

Audio Interviews

Daniel Hope in interview at Deutschlandfunk


Daniel Hope – Escape to paradise


  all audio interviews

Print Interviews



2014


Musik hat überlebt
Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung, 30.08.2014

Exil „Beide Urgroßväter haben im Ersten Weltkrieg für Deutschland gekämpft.“
Süddeutsche Zeitung (de), 25.08.2014

DANIEL HOPE ÜBER
Exil „Beide Urgroßväter haben im Ersten Weltkrieg für Deutschland gekämpft.“ „Das Letzte, was ich wollte, war Champagner trinken. Aber es gab kein Entrinnen…“ „Ich habe mir eine Zeitmaschine verschafft, damit ich die Musik besser verstehe.“ Zur Person

Interview: Gabriela Herpell

SZ: Sie sind in Südafrika geboren, in London aufgewachsen, leben in Wien. Wo gehören Sie hin?

Daniel Hope: Wenn ich meine Zugehörigkeit wirklich definieren müsste, würde ich mich wohl als Europäer bezeichnen. Aber meine ersten 20 Jahre habe ich in London verbracht, habe also die klassische englische Erziehung genossen. Ich spreche wie ein Brite, ich verfolge die englischen Nachrichten, gucke BBC, obwohl ich lange schon nicht mehr in London lebe.

In der deutschen Sprache gibt es das Wort Heimat, das sich auf ein reales Zuhause genauso beziehen kann wie auf ein geistiges.

In diesem Sinn wäre eben Europa und nicht England meine Heimat. Ich fühle mich genauso wohl in Deutschland, England oder Österreich – wo ich jetzt wohne – wie in Spanien oder Frankreich. Obwohl man natürlich auf große Unterschiede zwischen den Ländern trifft. Gerade das finde ich schön. Das fehlt mir in Amerika, so gern ich auch dort bin.

Das klingt fast zu vernünftig. Spüren Sie keine Zugehörigkeit durch die frühen Prägungen? Sie haben dieselben Fernsehserien geschaut, die gleichen Kinderbücher gelesen wie andere Engländer, nicht wie die Franzosen.

Ich habe in vielen Ländern gelebt und die jeweiligen Eigenarten schnell adaptiert. Ich habe in Lübeck studiert, das Norddeutsche ist mir sehr vertraut. Durch das erste Buch, das ich geschrieben habe, „Familienstücke“, habe ich die Verbindung zu Deutschland erst richtig wahrgenommen.

In dem Buch beschreiben Sie die Suche nach Ihren Urgroßeltern in Berlin. Was ist passiert?

Mein Großvater wurde Anfang 1934 von der SS in Berlin zusammengeschlagen. Er arbeitete am Deutschen Theater als Lichtregieassistent bei Max Reinhardt. Er hat sofort gewusst, was los war, hat seinen Koffer gepackt und Deutschland verlassen. Max Reinhardt sagte noch zu ihm, kommen Sie nach Hollywood, ich werde einen schönen Film machen. Den „Sommernachtstraum“. Mein Großvater sagte, dass er sich geehrt fühlte, aber so weit wie möglich weg wollte von Hitler. Hollywood hat ihm nicht gereicht, darum ging er nach Südafrika.

Ging er allein?

Seine Eltern haben nicht geglaubt, dass es so schlimm kommen würde. Seine Mutter ist 1939 in letzter Minute aus Deutschland weg. Mein Urgroßvater konnte sich nicht vorstellen, Deutschland zu verlassen, und nahm sich lieber das Leben, als das aufzugeben. Das Buch ist vor sechs Jahren erschienen. Seitdem vergeht kaum ein Tag, an dem mein Leben nicht in irgendeiner Weise zu diesem Buch in Beziehung gesetzt wird.

Wie meinen Sie das?

Neulich, nach einem Konzert in Düsseldorf, stand mir ein Mann gegenüber, dessen Vater der Anwalt meiner Urgroßmutter war. Er ist im Buch erwähnt, aber ich kannte ihn nicht. Das stärkt natürlich meine deutschen Wurzeln sehr.

Haben Sie durch die Arbeit an dem Buch Heimat dazu gewonnen?

Eine seelische Heimat, genau. Ich kann die schmerzhaften Erfahrungen, die meine Familie gemacht hat, spüren. Seit 1930 sind in unserer Familie alle Exilanten. Ich verstehe jetzt, was das heißt. Und habe Frieden damit geschlossen. Ich freue mich, in Deutschland zu sein, in Deutschland zu spielen, in Deutschland Musik zu machen. Meine Urgroßeltern waren ja auch ungeheuer patriotisch.

Das macht die Geschichte besonders tragisch.

Beide Urgroßväter haben im Ersten Weltkrieg für Deutschland gekämpft, beide waren hochdekoriert und liebten die deutsche Musik, die Literatur. Sie haben sich mit dem Judentum gar nicht identifizieren können. Ihre Familien sind Mitte des 19.Jahrhunderts konvertiert. Allerdings geht unser Stammbaum zurück bis zum ersten Rabbiner von Potsdam. Dazu kommen irisch- römisch-katholische Vorfahren. Sie sehen, ich kann mich nur als Europäer fühlen.

Wenn man so viel unterwegs ist wie Sie, hat man nicht das Bedürfnis nach einem Platz, der so etwas wie eine Heimat ist?

Das ist im Prinzip Wien. Die Musikstadt. Ich liebe es, an den Häusern vorbeizugehen, in denen Mozart oder Dvořák oder sogar Vivaldi gelebt haben. Ständig an die Musik erinnert zu werden, die ich täglich spiele. Obwohl – seit wir ein Kind haben, seit acht Monaten also, ist meine Heimat bei ihm. Wir sind sehr viel zusammen gereist. Und er hat das sehr gut weggesteckt. Das wird nicht immer so bleiben.

Die Österreicher können auch ganz schön abweisend sein, oder erleben Sie das nicht?

Oh ja. Die Wiener sind speziell. Aber ich bin genauso direkt wie sie. Man darf sich nicht einschüchtern lassen.

Darf man in London auch nicht, oder?

Absolut nicht. Aber dort beruht die Distanz auf Zurückhaltung, nicht auf Konfrontation. In der U-Bahn in London sagt niemand etwas. Doch wenn man den Menschen näherkommt, stößt man auf eine sehr freundliche Welt. Die Engländer gehören zu den höflichsten Menschen überhaupt.

Glauben Sie eigentlich, dass man das Exilantentum in der DNA hat? Und dass Sie sich deshalb leicht anpassen können?

Ich glaube, dass der Krieg die Nachkommen derer, die geflohen sind, genauso nachhaltig geprägt hat und immer noch prägt wie die Nachkommen derer, die umgekommen sind oder die sich schuldig gemacht haben. Meine Mutter ist in Südafrika aufgewachsen, mit Englisch als Muttersprache. Deutsch wurde nie mehr gesprochen in der Familie. Über Deutschland wurde auch nicht mehr gesprochen. Dieser Teil der Vergangenheit existierte nicht.

In letzter Zeit haben Sie viele Konzerte mit Musik aus Theresienstadt gegeben.

Ich bin, zusammen mit den Sängern Anne Sofie von Otter und Christian Gerhaher, auch nach Theresienstadt gefahren, wir haben Zeitzeugen getroffen und einen Film dort gedreht. Wenn man sich nur vorstellt, was aus der Musik geworden wäre, wenn diese vielen jüdischen Musiker damals überlebt hätten… Es fehlt einfach eine ganze Musikrichtung im 20. Jahrhundert.

Sie selbst leben ja, weil Ihre Vorfahren geflohen sind und überlebt haben.

Genau. Nach den vielen Jahren, in denen ich die Musik der Menschen gespielt habe, denen die Flucht nicht geglückt ist, wollte ich mich mit der Kehrseite beschäftigen. Also fing ich an zu lesen, ich habe Klaus Manns Exilliteratur gelesen, besonders wichtig war natürlich „Escape to Life“. Ich habe Thomas Mann gelesen, Hanns Eisler, und ich flog nach Los Angeles, um mich mit der Schönberg-Familie zu treffen, die immer noch in Arnold Schönbergs Haus lebt. Ich habe sie besucht, es wurde Wiener Schnitzel serviert, Sachertorte und Kaffee mit Schlag. Da stand immer noch der Stuhl von Arnold Schönberg, auf dem er saß, wenn er unterrichtete. Ich hatte das Gefühl, im Los Angeles von 1940 zu sitzen. Und wieder spürte ich, was es heißt, sich im Exil zu befinden.

Wie lang recherchieren Sie für ein solches Album?

Zwei, drei Jahre. Es war eine sehr intensive Zeit. Ich habe mich durch die Archive der Paramount Studios gewühlt. Und mit Leuten aus der Zeit gesprochen, mit 95-Jährigen, die erzählt haben, was Los Angeles bedeutet hat damals.

Wer war dabei?

Walter Arlen. Er ist 94, Komponist, floh 1939 aus Wien nach Los Angeles und wurde dann Kritiker der Los Angeles Times. Er war in jedem Konzert, er kannte all die Komponisten, die auf dieser Platte sind, persönlich. Der Pianist Menahem Pressler wiederum kannte noch Franz Waxman, der 1934 aus Deutschland geflohen war und in Hollywood Filmmusiken komponierte. Ohne diese persönlichen Informationen hätte ich mich nicht getraut, die Musik aus der Zeit nachzuspielen. Ich habe mir eine Zeitmaschine verschafft, damit ich die Musik besser verstehe.

Was ist an der Musik schwer zu verstehen?

Es gibt so viele Vorurteile der Filmmusik gegenüber. Man hält sie für banal. Aber das könnte nicht weiter entfernt von der Wahrheit sein. Ich habe ja nicht „Fluch der Karibik“ oder „Transformers“ aufgenommen. Sondern wirklich die Musik aus jener Zeit. Und die Komponisten mussten diese Musik schreiben, um zu überleben. Dabei waren gerade sie damals musikalisch auf einem ganz anderen Weg.

Auf welchem Weg?

Weg von der großen Symphonie. Denken Sie nur an Schönberg. Oder Korngold. Sie empfanden sich als Vertreter der musikalischen Moderne. Aber die Studiobosse wollten die große Symphonie von ihnen, und so wurden sie festgehalten in ihrer Entwicklung. Der Tonfilm war neu. Man brauchte einen Soundtrack. Der Hollywoodklang der Dreißiger- und Vierzigerjahre kam im Grunde aus Europa, das finde ich so spannend. Korngold hat komponiert, um Geld zu verdienen, mit dem er seine Verwandten aus Europa nachholen konnte.

Waren die meisten der Filmkomponisten jüdische Emigranten aus Europa?

Nicht nur die. Die Instrumentalisten auch. Das vervollständigte natürlich den europäischen Klang. Die Studioorchester damals in Hollywood waren mit den besten Musikern besetzt, viele von ihnen europäische Juden. Wenn man ein Violinsolo von 1935, 36, 38 hört, ist das oft Toscha Seidel. Oder Louis Kaufman. Kaufman allerdings wurde in Amerika als Sohn rumänischer Juden geboren. Ein schlauer Hund. Er hat die „Vier Jahreszeiten“ wiederentdeckt und populär gemacht. Vivaldi war vollkommen in Vergessenheit geraten. Louis Kaufman spielte die „Vier Jahreszeiten“ mit dem Klavier ein und machte daraus einen Riesen-Schallplattenhit. Da ging das Vivaldi-Fieber los, in Hollywood.

Aber das ist eine andere Geschichte. Einer der bekannteren Komponisten auf Ihrem Album ist Erich Wolfgang Korngold, geboren in Wien. Er galt schon mit elf Jahren als Wunderkind.

Und er ist für mich die Schlüsselfigur hier. Ohne ihn sind viele Filmkomponisten gar nicht denkbar. Und sein Violinkonzert ist eine alte, große Liebe von mir, weil Jascha Heifetz das so unglaublich gespielt hat, für mich der größte Geiger. Auch er hat Hollywood ja sehr geprägt.

Perfektes Zusammenspiel, wie bei Glenn Gould und den Goldberg-Variationen?

So ähnlich, ja. Ich habe das Stück schon gespielt, weil ich es so liebte, aber nur für mich, privat. 25 Jahre lang. Jetzt bin ich älter geworden und etwas mutiger. Da dachte ich, ich fange mal an, es auf Konzerten zu spielen. Und habe gemerkt, wie genial dieses Stück ist. Wie es spiegelt, was in Korngolds Leben los war: die Zerrissenheit. Ihm war immer klar, dass er Musik für Filme genauso lang komponieren würde, wie Hitler an der Macht sein würde. Dann würde er anknüpfen an die Musik, die er vorher komponiert hatte. Das Violinkonzert sollte sein Comeback werden.

Sie spielen auf dem Album auch eine Filmmusik von Ennio Morricone, die Musik von „Schindlers Liste“ und die von „American Beauty“. Wie passt das zu Ihrem Konzept?

Mich hat interessiert, wie groß der Einfluss der emigrierten Musiker auf den Hollywood-Sound war. Da kam ich auf Alfred Newman, amerikanischer Jude aus Brooklyn, der als der Pate der Hollywoodmusik gilt. Er komponierte die Musik für „Der Glöckner von Notre Dame“ und „Sturmhöhen“. Von ihm war es nicht weit zu seinem Sohn, Thomas Newman, der die Musik für „American Beauty“ komponiert hat, für mich eine der besten Filmmusiken überhaupt. So ging ich weiter, zu Ennio Morricone. Er war auch nach Amerika gegangen, zwar nicht im Krieg, sondern später. Aber er kam als unbekannter Orchestermusiker aus allerärmsten Verhältnissen. Und hat den Hollywoodklang ganz neu definiert.

Haben Sie ihn auch kennengelernt?

Ja, aber in einem anderen Zusammenhang. Das war hier, im Palace Hotel, ganz zufällig. Ist schon ein paar Jahre her. Hier steigen ja traditionell viele Musiker ab. Ich kam todmüde hier an, sah nur, dass nebenan der Raum voll mit Champagner trinkenden Menschen war. Das Letzte, was ich wollte, war Champagner trinken. Da stand auch schon Mstislaw Rostropowitsch vor mir, der russische Cellist, und sagte: „Mein Freund, komm rüber.“ Da gab es kein Entrinnen.

Sie haben doch Champagner getrunken.

Klar! Und er hat mich seinem Freund Ennio Morricone vorgestellt. Ich dachte, mein Gott, so was kann nur hier im Palace Hotel in München passieren. Dann hielt Rostropowitsch eine Rede, wie nur er sie halten kann, mit tausendmal zuprosten und anstoßen. Und sagte, mein großer Freund Morricone, ich freue mich jetzt schon darauf, dass du mir ein Cello-Konzert schreibst. Alle applaudierten. Es war klar, dass es nur eine Frage der Zeit sein würde, bis er das bekam. Denn er hat immer alles bekommen, was er wollte. Daniel Hope wurde am 17. August 1973 in Durban, Südafrika, geboren. Bald schon zog seine Familie nach Paris, dann nach London. Dort arbeitete seine Mutter bei Yehudi Menuhin. Der vierjährige Sohn begann, Violine zu spielen, und wurde später von Yehudi Menuhin unterrichtet. Mit elf führte Hope zusammen mit Menuhin Bartók-Duos für das Deutsche Fernsehen auf. Heute arbeitet er mit den großen internationalen Orchestern und Dirigenten, dirigiert viele Ensembles von der Geige aus und ist berühmt für seine Vielseitigkeit. So verbindet er oft Text und Musik, wie bei den Konzerten mit Musik aus Theresienstadt. In seinem Buch „Familienstücke“ (2007) ergründete er die Geschichte seiner Urgroßeltern in Berlin. Am 29. August erscheint sein neues Album: „Escape to Paradise – The Hollywood Album“.

So many strings to his bow…
www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk/so-many-strings-to-his-bow/ (en), 18.08.2014

From bestselling albums and intoxicating live performances, to books, films and charitable projects, Daniel Hope is so much more than a violinist. His appearances at the Bristol Proms have left audiences breathless and charmed in equal measure, for Daniel’s exquisite skill with the violin is matched by his warm stage presence and ability to really connect with an audience. It is some twelve years since Daniel was last on stage at St George’s, so his return is long overdue; and it is in these interim years that the musician, writer, producer and activist has truly made his name.

In October St George’s becomes the focus of four nights of live broadcasts by BBC Radio 3 as the Brahms Experience unfolds. With concerts by Skampa Quartet, the BBC Singers and pianist Stephen Kovacevich, not to mention a sojourn to Colston Hall with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, it’s a week-long celebration of one of classical music’s more misunderstood and underestimated composers. Brahms is so much more than a magnificent beard, or that lullaby…

Daniel’s contribution takes in one of Brahms’ closest friends and greatest muses, the violinist Joseph Joachim; with music by both, alongside works by Mendelssohn and Schumann.

We caught up with Daniel last month to discuss who Joseph Joachim was, why he’s so important to Brahms’ music and what audiences can expect from the concert in October.

- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – -

Daniel, we’re so looking forward to having you with us in October; when was the last time you performed at St George’s?

It was quite a while ago; it was with Paul Watkins and Philip Dukes, we did a Theresienstadt programme. This was probably twelve years ago… at least.

What can you tell us about this long awaited next visit?

It’s an homage to Joseph Joachim, who was the most instrumental and important violinist I think of the nineteenth century. He was somebody that, in so many ways, defined what the violin meant. Firstly he taught over five hundred students, he created the Royal Conservatory in Berlin; he famously introduced the young Brahms to the Schumann family and he was the one who rediscovered the Beethoven Violin Concerto. He made a very conscious decision, having studied Mendelssohn, when Mendelssohn died he moved in a sense to the other side, to Liszt – he became his concert master – and broke very famously with Liszt and crossed again to the other side and that was Schumann, Brahms and Dvořák, all of whom wrote violin concertos for him, including Max Bruch, and that’s why we have those concertos and we don’t have a violin concerto by Wagner, by Liszt. So he was really a forerunner in so many ways, his programming was exceptional; it was what we call ‘cutting edge’ nowadays, mixing genres, putting in symphonies next to chamber music, next to solo stuff, two hundred years before anybody else was doing it and he was a composer in his own right. So the concert looks at all these different influences; it looks at his composition, it looks at pieces that were written for him and it looks at his friends, so Mendelssohn, Brahms, Edvard Grieg…

But despite all of that, it’s a name that not many people would actually recognise? Is Joachim overlooked or forgotten?

I think, you know, at the end of the day it is composers whose names go down in history not interpreters, and that’s the way it is; and I think that’s the right thing because, you know, the composers write things that stay and we’re there to interpret them and share them. There was a time where everybody knew Joachim, but times have changed and his style of playing, his way of doing things I think fell out of fashion at the beginning of the twentieth century – even though he was the first violinist to actually record. There are rolls from 1904 of him, wax rolls, you can actually hear him, it’s amazing. So he was actually pretty advanced, but he belonged to the old guard and he was superseded by glittering violinists like Jascha Heifetz, Yehudi Menuhin, Mischa Elman… It became more about the personality and the brilliance and the perfection, and less about the communication and the feeling of the music. So I think it was just time that took its toll on his name really. And yet there are so many hundreds of pieces that we have because of him, thanks to him.

And this concert is of course part of a five night celebration of Brahms… Is he a composer you enjoy performing?

I absolutely adore Brahms, I just couldn’t live without Brahms… I mean, his chamber music is just incredible; the piano quartets, the piano trios, the piano quintets, the sextets… where do you start and where do you stop? I just can’t get enough of it and I play a lot of his music; I’m touring two piano quartets next year. It’s got something which is so personal and so emotional, and yet it’s controlled as well; that’s the thing about Brahms, he’s a master of control and there’s just nothing quite like it. And, you know, Joachim was – for the most part of his life – his closest musical friend and they broke, split, and then at the end of their lives got back together and the present he gave Joachim was the Double Concerto. I mean what a present! So Joachim really accompanied his whole life and when Brahms thought of the violin, he was thinking of Joachim.

Do you think that Brahms is underestimated as a composer?

I think maybe he’s not everybody’s cup of tea, although he never was, funnily enough. Menahem Pressler, of the Beaux Art Trio, the pianist, he told me he went to play for Darius Milhaud back in the early forties and Mihaud asked him what he’d like to play. He said ‘I have some Debussy’ and Milhaud said ‘Great’, and then he said ‘I have some Brahms…’ and Mihaud said ‘Brahms?! Ha, that Beerhouse composer?!’ I’d never heard Brahms referred to as a Beerhouse composer, but there were people who thought he was unsophisticated and I think some of his works are overlooked; and yet look at the symphonies, look at the violin concerto, look at the piano concertos, to name a few.. incredible. He was such a perfectionist; it was once said that he threw a number of his works into the fire, apparently another four of five violin sonatas, cello sonatas, all the rest of it… he was never happy. But for me, if I had to really choose a genre it’s the chamber music; the chamber music is so incredibly broad, from the sonatas – violin, piano, cello sonatas – the clarinet trio, the horn trio, piano quartets, piano quintets… it’s one piece after the next, every single one is a masterpiece, every one, and that’s amazing.

You’re doing this concert with Sebastian Knauer, with whom you’ve worked a lot – are those kinds of ongoing collaborations important to you?

Very. I’ve worked with Sebastian for twenty years now, we’re very close friends and we travel a lot around the world and he’s a phenomenal pianist and a great musician, great partner. We devise these programmes ourselves, we sit down and work out what we want to do and how we want to do it. Particularly for Brahms you need to have a fine pianist, because these sonatas really the emphasis is on the piano; Brahms was a master pianist himself and so the piano in a sense controls the pieces. So you need to have somebody who has weight and who has real knowledge and also an empathy to it. Brahms was born in Hamburg and Sebastian comes from Hamburg as well; it’s a particular place and he feels very close to him, so I wouldn’t want to do this programme with anyone else.

St George’s of course has a fantastic acoustic; how important is a venue to your performance? Can it inspire you?

Absolutely, I mean there’s nothing nicer than when it all connects; the venue, the audience, the programme and the connection between the audience and what you get back from them – it’s a two-way conversation that’s going on. I do remember the concert we did at St George’s and I remember this magnificent acoustic, and it being very flattering for string players; you have this resonance there, but not too much, so the instruments can really sing and I think for this programme it will be just ideal.

You’re well known for a kind of ‘Musical Activism’… what other issues are out there which would benefit from a bit of musical activisim?

A lot, I mean where do you start? One thing that I think is fascinating and which is extremely important is music therapy, and what music can actually do… That’s not activism, that’s just helping, in a sense; disabled people, autistic children, senile people, alzheimers. It’s incredible the effect that music can have. People who literally don’t know anything anymore – who they are, who their loved ones are – will suddenly recite a song for you with perfect lyrics. There’s something about the connection between the brain and music which I think is amazing; the same with Autistic children, it’s had an incredibly beneficial effect on their peace of mind and on their development. So I think that’s something which needs to be pushed, actually; we need more soloists to get in on it and help and use their names to do things like that. I would link that to music education, as the next biggest problem around the world because it’s just been cut from most curriculums. So that’s a major thing that I spend a lot of time on, working for other children’s charities at children’s concerts or a number of different organisations within Europe that give instruments to kids, or give them the chance to come into contact with music – and not just classical music, music in general, music, dance, singing. Those sorts of things I’m involved with and I do a lot for the music of the composers that were murdered by the Nazis; for example, I made a film about Theresienstadt that came out last year and just this week I did a concert in Munich – a benefit concert – fundraising for families of these composers, to support them. The list is long and there are a lot of very worthy causes and I think it doesn’t take all that much actually to give a bit of help here and there.

And away from that, what’s coming next for you?

I’m about to launch a big new album for Deutsche Gramophon, it’s called Escape to Paradise and it’s about the composers who fled Europe and went to Hollywood and created the ‘Hollywood Sound’. It starts in fact before they were forced out, so it starts with the eleven year old Korngold, with bits of his Pantomime and then it goes into his Violin Concerto and then it goes into the film music of the thirties and forties, so there’s things like Ben-Hur, there’s Suspicion the Hitchcock film, then it also looks at Hanns Eisler and Kurt Weill and Franz Waxman, and I have a couple of very special guests on the album. Sting is singing a song by Hans Eisler and there’s a German chanson singer called Max Raabe who is singing a Kurt Weill song. So it’s a very broad mosaic of, in a sense, a search for the Hollywood Sound – where did it come from, and this whole European tradition which was forced out and created something very special. So that comes out in September and there’s lots of projects linked to that, touring, recording, writing, producing, filming… all sorts.

We understand you also play the Saxophone… are we likely to see you at St George’s doing a Sax recital any time soon?

(laughs) I did at some point, when I was about thirteen or fourteen. You wouldn’t want to hear it, put it that way!

Distant Drum
Classic Feel (en), 01.05.2014

While Daniel Hope was recently on a short visit to Cape Town, Lore Watterson caught up with this multifaceted artist and talked to him about the many different projects he is involved with, including A Distant Drum, which he is preparing together with his father (the South African author Christopher Hope). This portrays the musical history of a dark time for South Africa, but one lit by defiance, music, wit and style.

“I think any musician can learn an enormous amount from a great actor through the way they deliver a phrase, and he really manipulates his voice in the most extraordinary way”

Lore Watterson: You are celebrated in the media as a British violinist, looking at your history, how do you see yourself?

Daniel Hope: That’s a very good question actually. I see myself as European. Of course I’m South African born, so my soul is here, it always has been. But I spend so little time here, you know we left when I was a baby, I grew up in England so I sound English and I went to school there, so my earliest influences and musical abilities are all associated with London. But I’ve lived out of the UK for so many years. When I was 18 or 19 I went to Lübeck to study, and then to Hamburg. Then I went to Amsterdam, and now I live in Vienna so I’ve always had this peripatetic existence, but Europe is where I really feel at home. I don’t tend to differentiate between where that is, I just love Europe. I love travelling, I love coming back here and I love travelling to other places but my old soul is Europe. And certainly German-speaking Europe because, on my mother’s side, there is such a strong German connection.

LW: You have published books in German about a Jewish family living in Germany. Is it about your mother’s family?

DH: Yes, it was a very strong Jewish family going back to the 15th century in Potsdam and Berlin, and they converted to Christianity in the 19th century, as many did, and were fiercely patriotic Germans until the Nuremburg Gazette where they were no longer Germans. As a result they lost everything and had to flee, so most of them came to South Africa, some to America, but my grandmother came here.

LW: How important is the ‘Jewishness’ in your family?

DH: For me personally, it is very important because it’s at least half of my identity. On the other hand I’m an extremely unusual mixture; my father is Roman Catholic, my mother is Protestant, although she has this very strong Jewish background. On the Jewish side, in particular my mother’s family, and the first book I’ve written is about the family and the house in Berlin, which is a fascinating house and the story of what happened to this house. It took me on a journey to discover more of my Jewish roots and they go back so far, back to the first rabbi of Potsdam. We were actually related, so there’s no escape from my Jewish roots. I don’t identify myself as Jewish although I have great empathy towards the Jewish religion and to that genetic makeup in me.

LW: There are lovely traditions that are part of celebrations…

DH: Absolutely, and the music of course: the violin is one of the ultimate instruments. The whole idea of children singing with their mothers, the accompanying violin is always present. It’s something very close to the Jewish soul and I identify greatly with that.

LW: Besides writing, I see you’ve done some very interesting projects with Klaus Maria Brandauer, for example, you performed Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s letters together.

DH: They’re amazing, they are the letters from Aus der Haft as he was in the prison in Tegel and awaiting his execution. They are the most extraordinary documents, because on the one hand, they are the letters home to his family where he maintains this angelic reverence; and then there are his diaries where he speaks his feelings and his mind, which are of course terrifying. The juxtaposition of course with Brandauer, who is such a great actor, is that we do performances together where he will read and I will play, and the emotions within the letters and the diaries, I try to match in the music that I play. We have music and text, and we try to bring these genres together. There are moments where I will improvise to his voice, as his voice has the most amazing colours, and then there are moments of pure music and pure text. He is one of my closest friends, we’ve worked together for the last 15 years, and for me he’s one of the greatest actors in the world. I think any musician can learn an enormous amount from a great actor through the way they deliver a phrase, and he really manipulates his voice in the most extraordinary way.

LW: You did Goethe’s Faust as well? Of course Brandauer being such a famous Mephisto.

DH: Yes, we did, and the Soldier’s Tale of Stravinsky. We also did a wonderful evening called Böhmen liegt am Meer, which is a story of the Czech Republic from the middle ages up to present day, with texts by Czech poets and music by Dvořák and Janáček. We’ve also done a Don Juan evening together. We usually meet four or five times a year to do one or two projects. I admire him enormously and he was one of the first great actors I worked with, and the first one to try new forms of presentation and trying to find a hybrid. That’s actually why I’m here in Cape Town for this new project I’m doing with my father, which is also going to be a totally new form of music and visual presentation.

It’s a project for Carnegie Hall, they’re doing a big South African festival in October this year, which will be 18 or 19 days with an amazing collection of South African artists, musicians, dancers etc. They’re all being shipped over to Carnegie Hall. Carnegie came to me about a year ago and asked me to come up with something, whatever I wanted, as long as it was big. So the first person I called was my dad, and I told him it was time we did something together. I’ve always admired his writing and I’ve always wondered if there was a way for us to get together. He was thrilled at the idea, so I told him to come up with the story and then we’d piece it together from there. He came back and told me there was someone he wanted to write about, and that was Nat Nakaza. He was one of the great literary voices of the 60s. He was with Drum magazine, and was forced out of this country and went to New York, but he became disillusioned with America and killed himself. So my dad had always been fascinated by Nakaza’s story and wanted to find a way to tell the story. I was only too pleased and said I’d get the music together. I went to Carnegie Hall, they loved it. I told them I’d love to, in a sense, create a modern day South African soldier’s tale. You take the idea of a piece to be sung, danced, semi-staged, so it’s not music theatre, or an opera or a concert – it’s a tale that’s told and somehow illustrated with music. All of this based on Nat Nakaza. Carnegie took it like a shot, so I called Andrew Tracey and asked him to be a musical guide, as I needed help to get the sounds of that time. We decided we needed two actors, so we chose John Kani’s son, Atandwa Kani, who is very talented – he will play Nat Nakaza. The second actor is a fantastic young Afrikaans actor named Christiaan Schoombie and he will be the counterpart, almost like the devil quality. We have a wonderful theatre producer, Mannie Manim, and it will be played in Bloemfontein on the 13th and 14th of October this year, and the Carnegie Hall performance will be the 28th of October. After that I’d like it to go around the world as I think it has the potential to be something very special. I believe Nakaza is not as well known as he should be, perhaps even forgotten about, and yet his wit, energy, rhythm and take on life and apartheid was so singular. His humour and his restraint, was yet so biting. My father has written this beautiful, poignant, dramatic play, and it’s my job to bring these people together. I have some fantastic musicians as well, such as Jason Marsalis, brother of Wynton Marsalis, as well as a young French cellist, François Sarhan, who works a lot with Sting. So that’s the reason I’m here; My father turned 70 yesterday, and I’m meeting up with Mannie.

LW: Why did you choose Bloemfontein?

DH: We have an excellent director, Jerry Mofokeng, and one of his main gigs is at the theatre in Bloemfontein. Tom Morris, who also did War Horse, is very interested in taking it.

LW: I’ve interviewed a lot of musicians, and what I found very interesting about you is that you manage to do it with your music and you are breaking out doing other things as well. Is that something you feel, that you need different outlets other than playing the violin?

DH: Yes I do, and we were raised that way by my father, to always have an opinion. He encouraged us to write, and I started at the age of 14 or 15 (writing for school papers), and I quickly realised writing was an extension of music for me. When I made my first few CDs I interviewed the composers and wrote the booklet text, which at the time was very unusual. Early in my 20s I started the Theresienstadt Project (also known by its Czech name as Terezín), a garrison town 60 km north of Prague, the central collection point or ghetto for between 50 000 and 60 000 Czech Jews) and interviewing survivors. This all led to what I do now, I am now writing my fourth book, which is about composers who fled Europe and went to Hollywood. I’ve just completed a new album which is coming out at the end of the year, featuring those composers from the 1930s and 40s. I’m going to LA next month to interview some surviving composers from that time.

LW: When you were young, was it your desire to play an instrument, or your parents?

DH: Yes it was me. My parents didn’t know much about music other than that they loved it. We left South Africa because my father’s books were banned here, so we went to England. My father took teaching jobs to make ends meet, but we ran out of money. My mother had trained as a secretary in SA, and she went to an agency who had two job offers, one being the secretary to Yehudi Menuhin. It was meant to be just for six months but six months became 26 years, and so in a split second our lives changed. Had that not happened we’d be living in South Africa and things would be very different. So my mom would take me with her to work everyday, which was Yehudi’s house, and I would listen to the music all day, and not just Menuhin’s – it was the people who came there, like Ravi Shankar. At the age of four, it was probably not a great surprise when I said I’d like to be a violinist. My mom found a lady nearby who specialised in teaching young kids and I started with her and that’s what ignited that spark. Then when I was about 15, Menuhin took an interest as he realised I was actually serious about this. Then when I was 18, I realised I didn’t just want to be a violinist, I wanted to be a musician.

LW: …and so much more than ‘the British violinist Daniel Hope’. CF

Daniel Hope liebt die ganz besondere Schwingung
Westfälische Nachrichten, 21.02.2014

Steinfurt – Violinvirtuose Daniel Hope hat jetzt zweimal die Bearbeitung von Vivaldis „Vier Jahreszeiten“ von Max Richter in der Bagno-Konzertgalerie gespielt. Mit unserem Redaktionsmitglied Hans Lüttmann sprach er darüber.

Mr. Hope, Sie haben Vivaldis „Vier Jahreszeiten“ einmal „eines der heiligsten Stücke der Musikgeschichte“ genannt. Was bedeutet das nun für einen Violinisten?
Daniel Hope: Dass er es wie kaum ein anderes Stück in- und auswendig kennt, ja, dass es sich sozusagen in sein Gehirn eingebrannt hat. Ich selber spiele es seit meinem achten Lebensjahr. Und eben hier im Bagno bei der Zugabe, wo wir das original Vivaldi-Presto aus dem Sommer gespielt haben, puh, da hatte ich echte Probleme, nicht wieder in die Richter-Komposition zu rutschen.

 

Als Max Richter Sie gefragt hat, ob Sie seine recomposed, also neu komponierte Fassung aufnehmen wollten, was bedeutete das?
Hope: Vor allem ganz viel üben. Was Richter da komponiert hat, ist zwar annähernd 90 Prozent Richter, aber oft liegt seine Komposition doch nur einen Hauch neben dem Original.
Eröffnet so ein Stück modern interpretierter Klassik eigentlich auch jungen Leuten den Zugang zu einer Musik, die sie oft als altbacken und verstaubt abtun?
Hope: Oh ja, wenn ich an eines unserer Konzerte neulich in London denke, da waren viele 25-, 30- und 35-Jährige, die diesen Vivaldi total toll fanden. Man muss dazu auch wissen, das Max Richter in England sehr populär ist.

Anders ist doch sicher auch dieser kleine Saal, der gerade mal 250 Zuhörern Platz bietet?
Hope: Aber das macht überhaupt keinen Unterschied; ich liebe diese kleinen Säle. Ich möchte natürlich die Carnegie Hall nicht missen, aber hier, wo ich schon zum ich glaube fünften Mal spiele, da spüre ich diese Vibes, ich weiß kein deutsches Wort dafür, diese ganz besondere Schwingung.
Etwas Besonderes klemmt da ja auch auf Ihrem Notenständer, ein Heft ist es nicht.
Hope: Nein, das ist ein iPad. Unten habe ich Fußpedale, mit denen ich die Noten weiterblättern kann. Eine wirklich tolle Sache, eine App für zweifünfzig, aber da stecken ganze Partituren drin.



2013


Neuer Film, neues Buch, neue CD
Die Welt, 23.08.2013

Schwerin – Stargeiger Daniel Hope ist unter die Filmemacher gegangen. Wieder eine neue Rolle für den 40-Jährigen.

Sein Publikum kennt ihn als herausragenden Interpreten klassischer wie neuer Musik, ferner als Buchautor, Moderator und Festival-Organisator. Der Dokumentarfilm, der im Herbst auf DVD erscheint und den Hope mitproduziert hat, erzählt die Geschichte des KZ Theresienstadt aus der Sicht zweier Überlebender.

Die beiden sind Musiker. Die inzwischen 109-jährige Pianistin Alice Herz-Sommer interviewte Hope in ihrer Londoner Wohnung, mit dem Jazz-Gitarristen Coco Schumann (89) fuhr er nach Theresienstadt. Dort war Schumann als junger Mann interniert, ehe er nach Auschwitz deportiert wurde. «Das war ein sehr groß angelegtes Projekt», erzählt Hope über den Film, bei dem Benedict Mirow Regie führte. Zum Projekt gehörte auch ein Konzert mit Musik aus Theresienstadt mit der Mezzosopranistin Anne Sofie von Otter in München. Die DVD soll in Schulen im Musik- und Geschichtsunterricht gezeigt werden.

Hope arbeitet zudem an einem neuen Buch, das nächstes Jahr erscheinen soll. Bisher hat der Brite zwei launige Bände über den klassischen Konzertbetrieb («Wann darf ich klatschen?») und über kleine und größere Katastrophen auf den Konzertpodien dieser Welt («toi toi toi») veröffentlicht. In «Familienstücke» erzählte er die Geschichte seiner weit verzweigten Vorfahren in Europa. Jetzt recherchiert Hope über Komponisten, die in den 1930er Jahren vor den Nazis flohen und in Hollywood landeten. «Dazu gehört auch ein CD-Projekt», sagt er. Mehr soll noch nicht verraten werden.

«Ich möchte gerne Neues erleben», bekennt Daniel Hope. Dafür gibt er anderes auf. So legt er in Kürze sein Amt als Künstlerischer Direktor der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern nieder, das er seit 2010 an der Seite von Intendant Matthias von Hülsen innehatte. Der Antritt des neuen Intendanten Markus Fein im Herbst 2013 ist für Hope der richtige Zeitpunkt. «Man ist im Sommer viel gebunden, wenn man bei den Festspielen Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in der Planung engagiert ist», sagt er. «Die Festspiele sind ein Riesenbetrieb geworden.» Mehr als 100 Konzerte finden jährlich statt.

Der bestens vernetzte Musiker hatte seinerzeit den Auftrag erhalten, das Klassikfestival internationaler zu machen. Hope organisierte einen Brückenschlag nach Amerika, wo er seit zehn Jahren das Savannah Music Festival im US-Staat Georgia als Künstlerischer Direktor maßgeblich prägt. Eine Kooperation mit dem Lincoln Center und der Carnegie Hall-Academy in New York brachte junge und etablierte Spitzenkünstler aus den USA nach Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. «Es sind zwei völlig verschiedene Welten, die wollten wir zusammenbringen», erklärt Hope. Wunderbare Freundschaften seien entstanden. Ende August und Anfang September gibt es noch einmal drei Konzerte des «Lincoln-Center-Projekts» in Fürstenhagen, Kotelow und Schwerin.

Als Violinist bleibt Hope den Festspielen erhalten, versichert er. Sein Publikum würde ihn auch schmerzlich vermissen, man kennt sich seit 15 Jahren. 1998 gewann Hope mit dem London International Piano Trio den Ensemblepreis der Festspiele, 2006 war er der erste «Künstler in Residence». Eine Saison ohne den charmanten Rotschopf mit der immer höher werdenden Stirn ist für viele schlichtweg undenkbar. «Daniel Hope ist das künstlerische “Urgestein” unserer Festspiele», sagt Festivalgründer von Hülsen. «Er hat uns wie kein Zweiter als Preisträger, Preisträger in Residence und künstlerischer Direktor zu internationalem Profil verholfen.»

Seit er seinen Abschied aus der Führungsriege der Festspiele verkündete, habe er jeden Monat ein Angebot bekommen, ein neues Festival zu gründen oder eines zu übernehmen, erzählt Hope. Er hat sie aber alle ausgeschlagen. Das liegt einerseits an den vielen neuen musikalischen Projekten, die er vorhat. Dazu gehört ein Violinkonzert, das Gabriel Prokofjew, der Enkel von Sergej Prokofjew, für ihn komponiert. Andererseits wartet im Herbst eine Rolle auf ihn, die den Musiker, Organisator und Weltmann ganz neu herausfordern wird: Ende November wird Daniel Hope zum ersten Mal Vater.

Das Publikum wird oft unterschätzt
Süddeutsche, 04.10.2013

Der Geiger Daniel Hope gehört zu den interessantesten Künstlern seiner Generation. Ein Gespräch über Fleiß, Kommunikation und guten Rotwein

Von Florian J. Haamann

Daniel Hope gehört zu den wichtigen Namen der klassischen Musik. Nicht nur, weil er ein hervorragender Geiger ist, sondern auch, weil er ein charismatischer Botschafter seines Genres ist. Denn die Kommunikation mit den Hörern ist für ihn ein ganz wichtiger Teil seiner Arbeit. Egal ob im Internet, in Interviews oder während seiner Konzerte. In seinem aktuellen Album “Spheres” beschäftigt er sich mit der Idee der Sphärenmusik. Der antiken Vorstellung also, dass Himmelskörper bei ihren Bewegungen Töne produzieren, die einen für den Menschen unhörbaren harmonischen Gleichklang bilden. Am Wochenende gastiert er mit dem Münchner Orchester am Jakobsplatz in der Stadthalle Germering und präsentiert Ausschnitte aus seinem Album sowie eine von Max Richter bearbeitete Version von Vivaldis Vier Jahreszeiten.

Herr Hope, Sie haben einmal die klassische Musik mit einem Glas guten Rotweins verglichen. Was haben Sie denn damit gemeint?
Daniel Hope: Ich wurde damals gefragt, was der Unterschied zwischen Pop- und klassischer Musik ist. Und da habe ich, vielleicht etwas voreilig, die beiden mit Champagner und Rotwein verglichen. Für mich ist es so, dass der Champagner eben sofort wirkt, man bekommt einen leichten Rausch und nach ein paar Tagen oder schon am nächsten Morgen, weiß man nicht mehr genau wie er geschmeckt hat.

Und der Rotwein?
Bei einem tollen Rotwein ist es so, dass es manchmal sehr viel Zeit braucht, bis er schmeckt, bis man versteht, wie komplex er ist. Und wenn man einen wirklich ausgezeichneten Tropfen zu sich nimmt, dann kann es sein, dass man sich noch Jahre später genau an den Geschmack erinnert.

Was ist Ihnen eigentlich lieber? Ein gutes klassisches Konzert oder eine gute Flasche Rotwein zusammen mit Freunden?
Das ist wirklich schwierig. Natürlich ist die Musik für mich das Wichtigste. Aber Musik ohne Freundschaft und ohne eine gewisse Liebe ist auch unvorstellbar für mich. Und ich genieße die Gesellschaft von guten Freunden sehr. Dazu gehört es für mich auch, einen tollen Tropfen Wein zu verkosten. Aber selbst der beste Wein der Welt wäre nichts ohne Musik. Von daher ist für mich immer Musik an erster Stelle.

Setzen Sie sich auch mal zu Hause hin und hören eine CD, oder gehen Sie vor allem in klassische Konzerte?
Das mache ich wirklich wahnsinnig gerne. Nicht so oft, weil ich kaum zu Hause bin. Wenn ich aber tatsächlich mal den Luxus habe, daheim zu sein, dann gibt es für mich nichts Schöneres, als diese alten Aufnahmen. Insbesondere die ganz alten Geiger vom Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts – und dabei einen wunderbaren Tropfen. Mehr geht nicht.

Erinnern Sie sich an die letzte CD, die Sie gehört haben?
Ich muss sagen ich bin etwas faul und auf MP3 umgestiegen, weil es so einfacher ist, meine gesamte Plattensammlung abzurufen, die Tausende CDs und Platten beinhaltet. Aber ich höre immer sehr gerne die großen Meister wie Fritz Kreisler, Adolf Busch, Mischa Elman und Jascha Heifetz. Also das sind für mich die Sternstunden.

Und auf Ihrem MP3-Player ist nur Klassik, oder auch etwas anderes?
Auf meinem Player ist einfach alles zu finden. Von Popmusik über indische Musik, Jazz, bis hin zu Neuerem, Experimentellem. Und natürlich auch Oldies. Wirklich bunt gemischt eben.

Gibt es auch aktuelle Popmusik, die Ihnen gefällt?
Das ist problematisch. Also es gibt einen sehr interessanten Künstler, den ich relativ oft höre: Devendra Banhart. Der macht eine Art von Popmusik, die ich interessant finde. Das bedeutet, er hat etwas zu sagen. Es ist nicht dieser massenproduzierte Pop, sondern bei ihm sind wirklich sehr viele Gedanken dahinter. Die Texte sind witzig, spritzig und er malt in musikalischen Farben, die mein Ohr aufhorchen lassen. Aus diesem Grund muss ich sagen, dass ich mehr Affinität zu den älteren Popmusikern habe, wie zum Beispiel Prince oder teilweise auch Sting, das ist die Art von Melodien, von Musikaufbau, der mir mehr zusagt als etwas, bei dem es einfach nur um Rhythmus und Klang geht.

Warum gibt es das in den jungen Generationen nicht mehr?
Ich weiß es nicht genau. Also beispielsweise ein Bob Dylan, der seiner Zeit einfach aus der Seele gesprochen hat, der fehlt heute. Manchmal, bei Künstlern wie Lady Gaga zum Beispiel, entdecke ich noch Seiten, die ich tatsächlich sehr spannend finde. Aber das meiste ist einfach im Studio so glattgebügelt, von der Stimme bis hin zur Instrumentierung, dass es mein Gehirn sozusagen völlig kalt lässt, und bei dieser Musik muss ich einfach sofort wegschalten, das kann ich nicht ertragen…

…dann hören Sie wahrscheinlich auch selten Radio?
Manchmal hört man vielleicht ein schönes Lied, aber dann geht’s gleich wieder daneben. Und damit ich dann nicht direkt einen Unfall baue, wechsle ich doch lieber den Sender.

Sie sprechen viel von Ihrer Liebe zur Musik. Wie definieren Sie eigentlich ihre Rolle als Musiker?
Es geht mir darum , die Musik dieser gigantischen Komponisten weiterzugeben, ihre Gedanken für das Publikum zu übersetzen. Und dabei einfach zu wissen, dass wir als Interpreten ganz klein gegen einen Mozart oder einen Beethoven sind. Lächerlich klein sozusagen. Aus diesem Grund ist es extrem gefährlich, sich als Interpret zu ernst zu nehmen. Wir haben eine Rolle und wir haben eine eigene Persönlichkeit, das muss natürlich rüber kommen. Aber das ist nicht das Ziel. Das Ziel ist, diese Musik lebendig zu machen.

Ist das klassische Konzert, bei dem ein Musiker im Mittelpunkt steht, dann überhaupt die richtige Form, um Musik zu vermitteln?
Ich denke schon. Man muss die Leute erst einmal in den Saal locken und dort muss man sie dann abholen, sie ein bisschen bei der Hand nehmen. Ich tue das, indem ich meistens ein Programm gestalte, von dem ich das Gefühl habe, dass es eine Geschichte erzählt. Bei Konzerten erzähle ich manchmal etwas über die Stücke, bevor oder während ich sie spiele. Damit das Publikum merkt, dass da mehr dahinter ist, als nur die Musik. Das Publikum wird meines Erachtens nach viel zu oft unterschätzt und man müsste ihm manchmal mehr bieten, als wir es tun.

Was den Publikumskontakt angeht, gehören Sie zu den besonders aktiven klassischen Musikern. Würden Sie sich in dieser Beziehung mehr Kollegen an Ihrer Seite wünschen?
Das ist ein schwieriges Thema. Ich verstehe meine sehr geschätzten Kollegen, die sagen: “Nein, das ist nicht mein Ding. Ich spüre Musik anders, ich möchte sie spielen und nicht darüber sprechen.” Das muss man akzeptieren und respektieren. Trotzdem es gibt Künstler, die das wirklich toll können, und ich finde, dass die, die bereit sind diesen Weg zu gehen, noch viel aktiver und energischer sein müssten. Weil man einfach sieht, was für eine Resonanz und was für ein enormer Austausch da stattfindet.

Wie könnte man denn mehr Künstler dazu bringen?
Ich finde, man müsste jungen Künstlern von vorneherein beibringen, wie man mit dem Publikum kommuniziert. Ob sie das dann einsetzen, ist deren Sache. Aber sie sollten wissen, welche Möglichkeiten es gibt. Da geht es nicht nur darum, zu moderieren oder zu sprechen, sondern auch, Konzertserien zu planen oder ein kleines Festival zu gründen. Oder einfach mal über Programmierung nachzudenken. Wenn sie zurückgehen ins 19. Jahrhundert und sich Josef Joachim, Johannes Brahms oder Felix Mendelssohn anschauen: Was die für Programme konzipiert haben, ist der Wahnsinn. Heutzutage sind wir weit davon entfernt, so erfinderisch zu sein wie diese Künstler damals. Natürlich muss das Technische dabei immer an erster Stelle bleiben.

Sie selbst überraschen ständig mit neuen Projekten. Sind Sie eigentlich ein Mensch, der schnell das Interesse an alten Dingen verliert, oder haben Sie einfach eine unstillbare kindliche Neugier?
Ich sage immer, ich leide an einer Überdosis kreativer Ideen. Mein Problem ist, dass ich überall Dinge finde, die mich neugierig machen. Und das geht eigentlich immer über meine Ohren. Ich höre etwas und dann entstehen Ideen, Projekte, Konzepte in meinem Kopf, und wenn ich mich ihnen widme, dann entsteht nicht nur ein Konzert, sondern ein ganzes Programm, ein Projekt. Manchmal trage ich diese Ideen jahrelang mit mir herum.

Können Sie ein Beispiel nennen?
Das Spheres-Projekt hatte ich im Kopf, seit ich acht oder neun bin. Nicht in dieser Art und Weise natürlich, aber die Idee mit den Planeten, der Musik, den Sternen. Trotzdem habe ich über 25 Jahre darüber nachgedacht, bis ich irgendwann eine BBC-Radiosendung gehört habe, in der Wissenschaftler darüber gestritten haben, ob es dieses Phänomen überhaupt gibt und wenn ja, wie man es beweisen könnte. Und plötzlich hatte ich die Idee, Stücke zusammenzubauen, die einen sozusagen anderswohin transportieren. Sie sehen, ich verliere das Interesse nicht schnell, ganz im Gegenteil. Es dauert manchmal wahnsinnig lange – und dann lasse ich nicht mehr los.

Wie war das denn damals in der Schule mit Ihrem kreativen Überschuss?
Das war ein Desaster für mich! Ich habe die Lehrer, meine Freunde und meine Eltern in den absoluten Wahnsinn getrieben. Ich wollte immer alles sofort wissen und verstehen. Und so bin ich noch heute. Wenn ich merke, ich kann etwas nicht wirklich gut, dann lasse ich es lieber. Das ist mir geblieben: dieses Ehrgeizige, diese Entdeckerseite.

Hat sich Ihr Verhalten in der musikalischen Ausbildung geändert?
Das war sehr interessant. Als ich angefangen habe, richtig Geige zu lernen, habe ich gemerkt, wie weit ich von anderen Geigern in meinem Alter entfernt war. Ich habe verstanden, dass ich richtig hart arbeiten muss, um auf dieses Niveau zu kommen. Das war eine komplette Umstellung meiner Gedanken, und das war gut so. Weil mich das zurück auf den Teppich gebracht hat, den Teppich der Realität. An dem ich bis heute klebe. Das heißt, ohne tägliche Übung ist es für mich nicht machbar.

Wie lange üben Sie denn am Tag?
Wenn ich die Chance habe, sechs Stunden. Und wenn ich das nicht schaffe, was natürlich beim Reisen sehr oft passiert, dann sind es mindestens vier Stunden. Aber ohne das ist es einfach nicht machbar, ein Berg-Violinkonzert, ein Strawinski-Violinkonzert oder einen Schostakowitsch zu bringen. Auf der Geige wird dir kein einziger falscher Ton verziehen. Dann steht es gleich in den Zeitungen und ist am nächsten Tag bei Youtube zu sehen und wird kommentiert von Menschen, die auf einmal die besten Kritiker sind.

Sie sind also jemand, der sehr hart und intensiv arbeitet. Wie war das bei Ihrem aktuellen Album?
Ich habe mich an den Computer gesetzt und angefangen zu recherchieren. Welche Stücke könnte man für eine sphärische CD verwenden? Schnell hatte ich ungefähr 3500 zusammen und mir war klar, dass das niemals auf eine CD passt. Also habe ich alles verworfen und mir einen neuen Ansatz überlegt.

Und zwar?
Ich habe darüber nachgedacht, ob es möglich wäre, in relativer kurzer Zeit Komponisten zu beauftragen, etwas zu schreiben. Dann habe ich mich hingesetzt, mir Komponisten angehört und die ersten Anfragen gestartet. Und plötzlich war da die Idee einer Reise mit kürzeren Stücke, Mosaiksteinchen quasi. Zusätzliche habe ich dann Stücke genommen, die es schon gab und von denen ich das Gefühl hatte, sie treffen die Idee von außerweltlicher Musik. Das ist natürlich immer eine ganz persönliche Idee. Es mag Leute geben, die sagen, das alles hat mit Sphärenmusik nichts zu tun. Für mich hat es das.

Was war für Sie besonders wichtig bei der Konzeption des Albums?
Die Dramaturgie. Wie ein Stück ins andere übergeht, wie die Tonart ist, wie es sich verändert. Ich versuche, den Hörer dazu zu bringen, dass er auf diese Reise mitgeht. So habe ich alles über lange, lange Zeit immer wieder zusammengepuzzelt.

Haben Sie aus der Beschäftigung mit diesem Thema auch eine persönliche Erkenntnis gezogen?
Der Kern dieses ganzen Prinzips ist für mich folgender: Was Musik ist, kann man nicht messen, nicht beschreiben. Die Emotionen, die sie aus den Leuten herauskitzelt. Dennoch, so die mathematische Aussage, ist die Schwingung berechenbar. Dieser Gegensatz fasziniert mich. Und er zeigt mir, dass die Musik über allem steht.

Am Wochenende spielen Sie gemeinsam mit dem Orchester Jakobsplatz aus München. Wie ist es zu dieser Zusammenarbeit gekommen?
Ich bin schon vor einiger Zeit auf dieses Orchester aufmerksam geworden, weil die Programme, die es gemacht hat, in meinen Augen sehr spannend waren. Und ich habe nach einem Orchester gesucht, das Zeit und Lust hätte, das Projekt zu machen. Dann haben wir das zusammen geprobt und im März in München zum ersten Mal gespielt. Das hat große Freude gemacht. Und daraus ist die Idee einer weiteren Aufführung gekommen.

Wie würden Sie das Orchester beschreiben?
Ich finde, der Zugang zum Repertoire ist etwas, was das Orchester ausmacht. Der Chefdirigent Daniel Grossmann macht das in meinen Augen sehr gut, indem er verschiedene Musikepochen miteinander kombiniert und natürlich auch indem er das Repertoire mit dem Jüdischen verbindet. Außerdem finde ich, dass es ein sehr energiegeladenes Ensemble ist, das aus sehr guten Musikern besteht. Solche Kammerorchester mag ich einfach gerne, mit denen man offen kommunizieren kann.

Haben Sie eigentlich schon einmal in der Stadthalle Germering gespielt?
Nein, noch nie. Es ist immer schön, nach so langer Zeit – ich stehe seit 25 Jahren auf der Bühne – noch eine neue Stadt entdecken zu dürfen, eine neue Halle, ein neues Publikum. Das ist wunderbar. Es gefällt mir, dass ich mit 40 Jahren sozusagen noch mein Debüt geben kann.

Aber bestimmt haben Sie sich schon umgehört, wie die Akustik ist.
Ich habe tatsächlich schon seit langem immer wieder von diesem Saal gehört. Die Leute haben ihn mir sehr ans Herz gelegt, nur leider hatte ich bisher noch nicht die Gelegenheit dort zu spielen. Deswegen freue ich mich sehr auf das Konzert.



  all print interviews

Selected Videos

titel, thesen, temperamente

Daniel Hope spielt Filmmusik

LISTEN TO

Cover

Escape to Paradise

Concert reviews

2014


Entspannte Virtuosität ohne Attitüde
schwäbische.de, 17.02.2014

Entspannte Virtuosität ohne Attitüde

Weingarten  Wie zu erwarten war das KuKo in Weingarten bis auf den letzten Platz gefüllt – Vivaldi zieht immer und wenn der Solist Daniel Hope heißt, dann ist schon die Vorfreude beachtlich. Das international zusammen gesetzte Kammerensemble (acht Violinen, zwei Bratschen, zwei Celli, ein Kontrabass, Cembalo und Laute/Theorbe) unter dem Konzertmeister Werner Ehrhardt begann mit Vivaldis Ouvertüre zur Oper L’Olimpiade, die sicher weniger bekannt ist, aber durch ihren musikalischen Schwung und ihre typische Tonfärbung sogleich in Vivaldis Welt entführte. Schon nach den ersten Takten musste man keine Sorge mehr haben, dass dieser Abend mit Barockmusik zu wenig Spannung haben könnte.

Danach zwei Zeitgenossen des Venezianers: das „Concerto a Quattro“ Nr. 1 f-moll des Neapolitaners Francesco Durante, das mit einem sehr getragenen Andante begann und auch sonst mit einer besonderen Tempi-Führung überraschte. Zum Vergleich dazu war das „Concerto a Quattro“ in D-Dur op. 5 Nr. 6 des aus Verona stammenden Evaristo Felice Dall’Abaco wieder sehr schwungvoll und tänzerisch angelegt; eine schöne Musik eines Komponisten, der durch den ihn fördernden Fürsten zunächst nach München und dann über Brüssel nach Frankreich kam.

Fröhliche Ausstrahlung
Nun – endlich! – der Star des Abends: Daniel Hope, zunächst mit Vivaldis „Konzert für Violine a-moll” op. 4, Nr. 4, zum Eingewöhnen vor der Pause. Hope, 1973 in Durban geboren, war bereits als Kind von Musik umgeben; seine Mutter arbeitete als Sekretärin von Yehudi Menuhin. Mit seinem rötlichen Haar und der athletischen Figur wirkt Hope jugendlich kraftvoll, dazu hat er eine konzentrierte und fröhliche Ausstrahlung. Kurzum ein natürliches Auftreten ohne Show und Attitüde. Höchst dynamisch und eindrucksvoll war schon das erste Konzert.

Hope hält Fäden in der Hand
Zu einem Klangerlebnis gerieten jedoch „Le quattro stagioni“ im zweiten Teil. Ob im Zwiegespräch zwischen Hope und Erstem Geiger (Werner Ehrhardt), mit dem kraftvollen Cembalo oder der sehr präsenten Laute, mal sehr gedehnt in „L’autunno“, mal fast dissonant zu Beginn von „L’Inverno“ – immer behielt Hope die musikalischen Fäden in der Hand und verknüpfte sie virtuos und beseelt.

Eine Überraschung
Die Zugaben wurden dann noch zu einer richtigen Überraschung. Daniel Hope, auf dessen ‘Notenständer’ ein Tablet stand, kündigte zwei Teile –Presto aus dem „Sommer“ und das Allegro non molto aus dem „Winter“ – aus der vor zwei Jahren entstandenen Komposition „Vivaldi recomposed“ des britischen Komponisten Max Richter (1966 in Deutschland geboren) an. Richter, der unter anderem bei Luciano Berio studierte und Kammermusik, Orchesterwerke sowie Filmmusik schreibt, bewahrt den Drive der Barockmusik, verschiebt nur leicht die Akzente, verdoppelt manches, hebt die oberen Töne heraus, klingt mal ein wenig nach Phil Glass, verändert aber nur wenig die Strukturen. Ein schöner musikalischer Joke, intelligent gemacht.

Elegant und heiter verabschiedete sich der Solist mit „Guten Abend, gute Nacht“, das er besonders einer alten anwesenden Freundin widmete, vom glücklichen Publikum.

Von Dorothee L. Schaefer

Schnörkellos durch das Vivaldi Jahr
BT (de), 20.02.2014

Herz aus Gold
BNN (de), 21.08.2014

Destination America @ Chamber Music Society
Oberon's Grove (en), 01.04.2014

by Philip Gardner

Sunday April 6th, 2014 – Works by 20th century composers who were American either by birth or by embrace provided an intriguing programme at Alice Tully Hall today in this Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center presentation. With a level of artistry seemingly beyond compare, seven unique musicians joined forces to the delight of the Society’s dedicated audience.

I’m still on a Bartók high from Peter Serkin’s playing of the composer’s third piano concerto with the NY Philharmonic last week, so today’s CMS concert presented an welcome opportunity to experience the composer’s CONTRASTS.  This was followed by works of Ives, Prokofiev and Korngold. The violinist Daniel Hope played in all four works this evening, and what a gift to music this British gentleman is.

The celebrated clarinetist Benny Goodman and violinist Joseph Szigeti commissioned Bela Bartók for a work, asking for a two-movement piece. It eventually evolved into the currently-known three-movement setting, entitled CONTRASTS, which Szigeti, Goodman and Bartók first performed together at Carnegie Hall on April 21st, 1940. The work opens with a Verbunkos, which was a recruiting dance executed by a members of the Hussar regiments to entice young Hungarian boys into joining the military. The Sebes (the last movement) is a fast dance that the boys improvise before signing up. Sandwiched between these dances is the Lento middle movement, mysterious and somewhat nightmarish.

Mr. Hope’s playing, which ranged from frantic virtuosity to moments of spine-tingling pianissimo subtlety, was matched by the superb ‘singing’ of Romie DeGuise-Langlois’s clarinet. Their musical rapport was instantaneous, and the pianist Gloria Chien’s rhythmic and coloristic vitality made for a very exciting presentation of this trio.

Charles Ives’ LARGO began its musical life as a violin/piano duet; the composer later made another arrangement, adding a clarinet. Mr. Hope and Ms. DeGuise-Langlois returned for this rarity, joined by Wu Han at the piano. Here the violinist displayed ravishing control, his final note suspended on the air for what seemed an eternity: just remarkable! Ms. DeGuise-Langlois’s playing is mellow and true, and Wu Han’s gift for sustained delicacy combined with her colleagues to hold the audience in rapt attention.

Prokofiev’s violin sonata in D-Major – the most familiar work on today’s programme – plays in four movements:
I.    Moderato
II.    Scherzo. Presto
III.    Andante
IV.    Allegro con brio

Mr. Hope and Wu Han gave a performance nothing short of ideal. In this sonata we experience a sonic panorama of everything that makes Prokofiev such a fascinating composer: evocative lyricism with a modern nuance, dazzling and often jagged stretches of virtuosity, infectious dance rhythms, moments of pensive calm and – most delicious of all – a dash of wit. This is music that can give you a smile one moment and move your soul the next. Mr. Hope and Wu Han established such a lovely and mutually cordial dialogue, alert to every colour in the composer’s dazzling palette.  Their spontaneous embrace as the audience lavished them with sustained applause marked the special unity of their very impressive collaboration.

The concert ended with Korngold’s luminous piano quintet in E-major, the earliest-written work on the programme. No other composer I know of can evoke the sense of sehnsucht (‘longing’) like Erich Korngold, even when we are not sure exactly what we are longing for. The gorgeous, yearning melodies pass from voice to voice, with a kind of fragmented sentimentality one might experience while leafing thru an album of pictures from some nearly-forgotten time of past happiness and regret.

In the 1920s, Erich Korngold was the most-performed operatic composer in German-speaking countries after Richard Strauss, thanks in part to the great success of DIE TOTE STADT which he completed in August 1920. The Piano Quintet in E major was composed a year later, and its richly romantic melodic style is redolent of the same perfume which intoxicates us when we hear Marietta’s lied from DIE TOTE STADT. After coming to America, Korngold became a beloved composer of film scores (winning two Academy Awards) and his music has a cinematic quality.

This evening’s playing of the quintet was – in a word – magical. Mr. Hope’s shining expressiveness set the tone, with those deluxe violists Yura Lee and Paul Neubauer at their most communicative and the wonderfully resonant sound of David Finckel’s cello giving the ensemble its emotional center. Gloria Chein’s playing had a luxuriant pliancy and again the rapport between these artists is just so moving to behold. I must mention one solo passage by Paul Neubauer which literally pierced my heart. As this melodious work drew to its end, the audience embraced the players with waves of warm applause.

I sometimes think I should go backstage to meet the artists after these concerts but really, what could I say except: “Thank you!…thank you for your uplifting artistry in these troubled times…a beacon of light in a darkening landscape.”

Today’s programme:
•    Bartók Contrasts for Violin, Clarinet, and Piano, Sz. 111, BB 116 (1938)
•    Ives Largo for Clarinet, Violin, and Piano (1934)
•    Prokofiev Sonata in D major for Violin and Piano, Op. 94a (1943, arr. 1944)
•    Korngold Quintet in E major for Piano, Two Violins, Viola, and Cello, Op. 15 (1921)

The evening’s participating artists:
•    Gloria Chien, piano
•    Wu Han, piano
•    Daniel Hope, violin
•    Yura Lee, violin
•    Paul Neubauer, viola
•    David Finckel, cello
•    Romie de Guise-Langlois, clarinet

Korngold Piano Quintet gleams in Chamber Music Society program
New York Classical Review (en), 02.04.2014

Strict chronological programming, as the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center have done in their 45th season, is a tricky business. There is a risk of concerts becoming “one-note,” and the restriction leaves artists in something of a bind as far as coming up with creative, intelligent and challengingly contrasted programs.

“Destination America,” the title of CMS’s Sunday evening program imposed a didactic tone on a concert that needed none. The works presented, quite apart from making any revealing statement about America’s musical culture or influence, showcased four remarkable composers who, despite having close biographical dates, brought from their differing backgrounds and experiences a startlingly diverse range of musical expression.

Violinist Daniel Hope curated the program, and picked a virtuosic piece to close out the first half with Prokofiev’s Violin Sonata in D-major. Originally for flute and piano, the composer prepared this arrangement for the legendary David Oistrakh, and it has been cherished by violinists since. We hear both the lyricism and the chirping of a flute, but with the hard, gritty edge that Prokofiev often brought to his writing for the violin, as in the two concerti and the solo sonata. Hope played the sonata brightly, but not gently, while Wu Han kept an aptly heavy foot on the sustaining pedal, giving a fleshy, stewing feel to the music.

Charles Ives had a bite-sized role in the program, in his ephemeral Largo for violin, clarinet and piano. It is an intimate piece, but despite its brevity and small scale there is a charge running through its searching lines, underlined with tender grace by Hope, Han, and clarinetist Romie de Guise-Langlois.

De Guise-Langlois provided some sensational playing in the performance in Bartók’s Contrasts. The composer wrote the piece with Benny Goodman in mind, and the result is a spectacularly taxing, occasionally jazz-infused clarinet part. De Guise-Langlois tackled the piece with confidence, virtuosity, and sensitivity. She brought charming humor to the first movement’s limping theme every time it resurfaced, and was matched with tugging sorrow from Hope.

Eyes glued to each other, the trio were completely open to each other in the wandering, empty Pihenő, which featured limpid, spacious playing from pianist Gloria Chien. Hope switched violins for the scordatura opening of Sebes, the ferocious, spirited finale. Even in the midst of the movement’s fury, the players managed to find fierce joy in the music.

Korngold’s Piano Quintet in E major anchored the program, with the additions of violinist Yura Lee and violist Paul Neubauer. Anyone curmudgeonly enough to write off Korngold as a “mere” film scorer would surely have been convinced by this piece, rich and big-hearted in its writing, but complex and truthful in its expression.

The first movement opens with a grand sweep but quickly morphs into discrete individual lines, no less warm for their searching loneliness. The five musicians dug into the stomping finale with heft that transformed into shining energy, forcing rapt attention to the movement’s skittering figures.

The highlight, though, both of the quintet and of the whole program, was the second movement. Based on the composer’s own song Mond, so gehst du weider auf, it is a smoky, summery adagio, and the group’s rapt and focused playing conveyed the intense, aching emotion in Korngold’s lyricism. The music has at once the souped-up texture of Hollywood writing and the sincere individuality of Korngold’s contemporaries, combining free, modernist tonality with a romantic sonority. The strings pined their way through the emotive lines while Chien seemed to pluck the piano like a harp.

Eric C. Simpson



  all concert reviews

Press Reviews

2014


Das war meine Rettung
Zeit Magazin, 01.10.2014

Einen Traum erfüllt: Daniel Hope und sein Hollywood-Album
hr2-Kultur, 02.10.2014

Was macht man, wenn die Tage wieder kürzer werden und es draußen ungemütlich wird? “Weg von hier”, mag sich der eine oder andere da denken. Da kommt das neue Album von Daniel Hope gerade richtig: “Escape to Paradise” heißt es, ein Hollywood-Album, für das der Stargeiger Musik aufgenommen hat, die beispielhaft ist für den Sound, der die Bilder aus der Traumfabrik seit Jahrzehnten so eindrucksvoll ergänzt.

 

Erschienen ist die CD bei der Deutschen Grammophon, mit Werken von Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Hanns Eisler und Kurt Weill bis hin zu Filmmusik aus Casablanca, Ben Hur, Schindlers Liste oder American Beauty.

Wer Daniel Hope kennt, der weiß, dass er für fantasievolle, ja fantastische Projekte steht, in die er viel Kreativität und Herzblut steckt. Diesmal hat er Musik von Exil-Komponisten aufgenommen, die in der Traumfabrik von Los Angeles gestrandet waren und dort den “Hollywood-Sound” kreierten – ein Klang mit Geschichte und vor allem aus Geschichten. Einzelschicksale, Träume, in Klänge verpackt, und großes, menschliches Kino.

2 Jahre Recherche

Zwei Jahre hat Daniel Hope für sein Album recherchiert. Er stöberte in den Archiven der Paramount Studios und dabei wurde klar, dass in vielen Kompositionen der Gedanke der Flucht mitspielte, das Zurücklassen alter Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft. Auf seiner CD spannt Daniel Hope einen Bogen von dem jungen Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis hin zu Komponisten, die zwar keine Flüchtlinge mehr waren, deren Musik sich aber auf eigene Weise mit dem Thema Flucht beschäftigt: So ist z.B. John Williams‘ Musik zu Schindlers Liste dabei, oder auch das Love Theme aus Cinema Paradiso von Ennio Morricone.

Hollywood schreibt auch Musikgeschichte

Der Hollywood-Sound vom Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten bis heute – mit “Escape to Paradise” ist es Daniel Hope gelungen, den Fokus auf das zu richten, was sonst eher hinter opulenten Bildern verschwindet: denn die Filmindustrie der Traumfabrik hat auch musikalisch Geschichte geschrieben.

Wie waren die Hörgewohnheiten der Komponisten, die aus Europa nach L.A. kamen? Und welchen Einfluss hatten sie auf die Soundtracks von heute? Überflüssig zu sagen, dass es Daniel Hope bei aller Leidenschaft zu vermeiden weiß, sich der Gefühlsduselei hinzugeben. Mit seinem Album verwandelt er sich in einen Regisseur, der zeigt, dass Hollywood mehr ist als eine wunderschöne Kulisse. Mit seiner wandlungsfähigen Geige führt Hope die unterschiedlichsten Bilder vor Augen. Dazu tragen auch Sting, Max Raabe und all die anderen Musiker bei, die bei “Escape to Paradise” mitgewirkt haben, außerdem reizvolle Arrangements, die manchen bekannten Titel in einem ganz neuen Gewand präsentieren, und ein biegsames Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. Mit diesem Album dürfte sich Daniel Hope einen Traum erfüllt haben – und nicht nur sich!

Von Adelheid Kleine

Escape to Paradise
Gramophone, 15.10.2014

Als den Eltern auf der Flucht das Geld ausging
Sonntagszeitung, 28.09.2014

von Christian Hubschmid

 «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie»: Daniel Hope, 41
Der blaue Siegelring an seinem rechten kleinen Finger leuchtet wie das Meer. Bald muss Daniel Hope auf die Bühne, doch hat er noch schnell Zeit für ein Interview. «Es entspannt mich», sagt der 41-jährige Geiger. Und bittet in seine Künstlergarderobe in der Alten Oper Frankfurt.

«Das Siegel zeigt das Familienwappen meiner Grossmutter», sagt der Brite Hope in perfektem Deutsch. Die Geschichte seiner Familie ist die Geschichte einer mehrmaligen Flucht. Zwar trat die Familie schon im 19. Jahrhundert vom Judentum zum Christentum über, trotzdem wurde Hopes Grossvater 1934 in seiner Heimatstadt Berlin auf offener Strasse ­zusammengeschlagen. Sofort entschied sich der Grossvater, fortzugehen. Nach Südafrika. Von wo später auch Hopes Vater fliehen musste. Als Apartheid-Gegner in den Siebzigerjahren.

Es ist deshalb kein Zufall, dass Daniel Hope nach dem Interview das Violinkonzert des jüdischen Exilanten Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897–1957) spielen wird. Wobei «spielen» eine Untertreibung ist. Hope lässt das Stück knallen, bringt es zur Explosion wie ein Feuerwerk. Und danach wird man sich fragen: Korngold? Warum kennt man diesen fantastischen Komponisten nicht?

 Musik von Komponisten,  die vor den Nazis flüchteten

«Weil Korngold nach seiner Flucht Filmmusik für Hollywood geschrieben hat», sagt Daniel Hope. Zwei Oscars hat er bekommen, nachdem er in den Dreissigerjahren nach Hollywood emigriert war. Erst nach Hitlers Tod konnte er die Orchestermusik schreiben, die er eigentlich schreiben wollte. So erging es ihm wie vielen Flüchtlingen, deren Musik Daniel Hope auf seiner neuen CD «Escape to Paradise» wiederaufleben lässt.

Es ist Musik von Komponisten, die vor den Nazis in die USA flüchteten. Und es ist «nur» Filmmusik. Doch Daniel Hope macht keinen Unterschied zur zweckfreien Kunst. Die Komponisten hätten ein neues Medium mitgeschaffen, sagt Hope: den Soundtrack zum Tonfilm, den es erst seit wenigen Jahren gab. Die Filmfabrik Hollywood engagierte die europäischen Flüchtlinge mit Handkuss. Wenn sie auch nicht alle glücklich machte. Denn Musik am Fliessband zu schreiben, ist nicht jedermanns Ding. Doch sie komponierten «meisterhaft», schwärmt Hope.

Daniel Hope ist einer der wichtigsten Geiger der Gegenwart. Heute Sonntag wird er in Zürich auf der Bühne stehen, am Eröffnungskonzert des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO). Hope ist in der Saison 2014/15 Artist-in-Residence dieses renommierten Orchesters. Er sei mit dem ZKO seit seiner frühesten Kindheit verbunden, erzählt er. Jeden Sommer habe er als Kind in Gstaad verbracht, wo das ZKO jeweils am Menuhin Festival auftrat. «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie», sagt Hope. Und das kam so.

Daniel Hopes Vater, der Schriftsteller Christopher Hope, wurde vom Apartheid-Regime in Südafrika beschattet, weil er sich gegen die Rassentrennung engagierte. Als auch das Telefon abgehört und er bedroht wurde, floh die Familie Hals über Kopf. Erst nach Frankreich, dann nach London.

Mit 27 jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio

«Hier ging uns das Geld aus», erzählt Daniel Hope lachend. Es war vielleicht sein grosses Glück. Denn nun suchte die Mutter einen Job und wurde Sekretärin des grossen Geigers Menuhin. 26 Jahre lang blieb sie an dessen Seite, die meiste Zeit als seine Managerin. Und Daniel Hope verbrachte seine Sommerferien am Menuhin Festival in Gstaad, dem berühmten Virtuosen lauschend, der oft mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester spielte. Das letzte Konzert, das Menuhin als Geiger gab, erlebte Hope in der Kirche von Saanen mit.

Und er wurde selber Geiger. Einer der besten der Welt. Mit 27 war er jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio. Heute kann er sich aussuchen, mit welchen Orchestern und Dirigenten er auftreten will. Er arbeitet auch mit Popkünstlern wie Sting zusammen und veröffentlicht Bücher, von denen jenes über seine Familiengeschichte, «Familienstücke», ein Bestseller wurde.

Was kein Wunder ist, wenn man diese Geschichte kennt. Denn auch Hopes Urgrossmutter war seinerzeit 1939 aus Berlin nach Südafrika geflohen. Nur der Urgrossvater schaffte es nicht. Er nahm sich in Berlin das Leben. Als deutscher Patriot ertrug er den Gedanken, aus seiner Heimat fliehen zu müssen, nicht.

Daniel Hope steht auf und nimmt seine Geige zur Hand. Er sagt, Musik könne die Welt nicht verändern. «Aber sie ist eine Chance, ein Gespräch anzufangen. Und wir können die Katastrophen dieser Welt nur mit Gesprächen aufhalten.»

Dann geht er auf die Bühne.

Daniel Hope spielt heute mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester Werke von Mozart.  Zürich, Tonhalle, 19 Uhr

Der Sound von Hollywood
Crescendo, 22.09.2014

Escape to Paradise
BR-Klassik, 22.09.2014

Der Geiger Daniel Hope, geboren 1973 in Südafrika, spricht nicht nur fließend Deutsch. Er ist auch bekannt für seine Vielseitigkeit und seine ausgefallenen Programm, die niemals nur unterhaltsam sein wollen sondern meist eine inhaltliche Botschaft haben.

Schon beim CD-Cover fällt auf: Alles ist hier irgendwie nostalgisch geraten. Und eigentlich müsste der Schriftzug im Hintergrund noch “HollywoodLand” heißen – wie zu jenen Zeiten, von denen diese CD erzählt. Es ist die große Ära der europäischen Emigranten. Die Ära des Holocaust. Und der Focus dieses Filmmusik-Album liegt auf jenen jüdisch-europäischen Exilanten, ohne die es den später so genannten “Hollywood Sound” vermutlich nie gegeben hätte: Miklos Rozsa, Franz Waxman und erst recht Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Schwelgerischer als Heifetz

Korngolds Violinkonzert op.35 ist das ausladendste und sicherlich prominenteste Werk dieser CD; ein Werk, das einerseits eng verknüpft ist mit den Soundtracks großer Errol Flynn-Streifen wie “Another Dawn” oder “Der Prinz und der Bettelknabe”, das andererseits aber längst ins feste Repertoire großer Geiger gehört, seit Jascha Heifetz das Werk auf der Konzertbühne uraufführte. Daniel Hopes Interpretation ist deutlich schwelgerischer als diejenige von Heifetz, und sie ist – wie fast alle Darbietungen dieser CD – durchdrungen von Hopes Sendungsbewusstsein. Ihm geht es um jene Botschaft abseits des glamourösen Hollywood-Emblems und um die Aufdeckung durchaus tragischer Begleitumstände, die zu dieser Musik geführt haben.

Begnadeter Geigeninterpret und verbaler Mittler

Der scheinbar beschwingte Walzer aus “Come back, little Sheba” beispielsweise wurde von dem Mann komponiert, den 1934 die Nazis in Berlin auf offener Straße zusammenschlugen und der dann über Paris in die USA emigrierte: Franz Wachsmann, der sich später “Waxman” nannte. Und wenn an anderer Stelle Max Raabes wohlvertraute Nostalgiestimme erklingt, nämlich in Kurt Weills “Speak Low”, dann erhält auch das plötzlich ein ganz anderes Gewicht – dank der Person Daniel Hopes, der hier wieder einmal in einer Doppelrolle agiert: als begnadeter Geigeninterpret und im Begleitheft als verbaler Mittler.
Ein durchaus nachdenklich stimmendes Hollywood-Album!

Von: Matthias Keller

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 09.09.2014

Der Geiger und Forscher Daniel Hope erinnert an jüdische Emigranten, die mit Filmmusik eine neue Existenz aufbauten.

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben

Es muss ein Thriller sein
Gala, 04.09.2014



2013


Spheres
Bayern Klassik, www.br.de, 13.02.2013

Eine Auswahl sinneserweiternder, meditativer, melodiöser Musik wird auf der CD-Rückseite angekündigt. Eine Zeitreise vom Barock bis in die Gegenwart. Und eine Sternenreise: Die Musikzusammenstellung erklärt Daniel Hope mit seiner Faszination für den Nachthimmel, für die Weite des Universums.
Autor: Ben Alber Stand: 13.02.2013

 

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? – diese Frage verbinde die Musik auf seiner CD, so Hope im Booklet. Mit einer atmosphärisch dichten Bearbeitung einer Solo-Sonate des Barockkomponisten Johann Paul von Westhoff beginnt meine Sternenreise an der Seite von Daniel Hope. Ein erster Blick in den Nachthimmel, es glitzert silbrig, ich hebe langsam ab und freue mich auf den Flug. Dann “I giorni” von Ludovico Einaudi, ein Stück, das es vor nicht langer Zeit in die britischen Single-Charts brachte und in einige Werbespots – zum Beispiel in den eines indischen Telekommunikations-Anbieters.Und da passt es sicher auch gut. Die Botschaft auf “Spheres” vielleicht: “Ja, da draußen ist irgendetwas, ein ganzer Haufen Telekommunikationssatelliten!”

Konzeptalbum mit rotem Faden

Ich vertraue meinem Reiseleiter und bleibe an seiner Seite. Ich gebe zu, die Versuchung war groß, zur Erde zurückzukehren. Aber ich werde für meine Toleranz belohnt: Je länger die Reise dauert, desto mehr erschließt sich Hopes Idee, dem die Reihenfolge der Stücke auf der CD sehr wichtig ist. Nämlich die Idee eines geschlossenen Konzeptalbums, das inhaltlich und klanglich ein roter Faden durchzieht, und das doch auch immer wieder überrascht. Gerade mit zahlreichen Miniaturen jüngerer Komponisten: Max Richter, Alex Baranowski, und Gabriel Prokofiev, der Enkel von Sergeij Prokofiev, haben unter anderem Stücke geliefert, die überzeugen. Prokofiev ist es, der mit seinem “Spheres” am deutlichsten eine Projektionsfläche bietet für die Ängste, die auch Platz haben bei einer (Gedanken-)Reise ins Universum: Wenn da draußen etwas ist – ist es uns auch wohlgesonnen?

 

Ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel

Neben einem ganzen Reigen eingängiger Geigen-Melodien – mal im zarten Duo mit Klavier, mal in weichen Streicherklang gebettet, mal pompös orchestral und vokal aufgeladen – hat auch das unheimliche schwarze Nichts zwischen den glitzernden Sternen immer mal seinen Platz auf dieser CD. Und das ist gut so. Trotz Mars-Mobil und Raumstation bleibt das Universum doch ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel. Schade, wenn das in der Musik anders wäre.

Spheres – Daniel Hope
www.klassikerleben.de, 14.02.2013

Es ist eine Zusammenstellung von Miniaturen, aber auch etwas längeren Sätzen, die an stilistischer Bandbreite kaum zu überbieten ist. In seiner offenen und stets auf Unentdecktes neugierigen Art forscht der Geiger und künstlerische Leiter der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Daniel Hope, mit dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin unter Leitung von Simon Halsey und bei einigen Tracks sogar unterstützt vom Rundfunkchor Berlin in deutschem, italienischem, amerikanischem und russischem Repertoire nach wahren Pretiosen für sein Instrument. Viele Tracks stammen vom italienischen Filmmusikkomponisten Ludovico Einaudi. Dann werden Ausschnitte aus den berühmten, im John-Neumeier-Ballett „Preludes CV“ auch vertanzten 24 Präludien für Violine und Klavier der russisch-amerikanischen Komponistin Lera Auerbach mit Arrangements von barocken Bach-Präludien oder Genrestücken des Amerikaners Karl Jenkins kombiniert. Selbst Minimalistisches von Philipp Glass oder Michael Nyman findet sich in dieser aparten Sammlung von Violinwerken. Nicht vom großen Sergej, sondern vom jungen Gabriel Prokofjew stammt der Titel „Spheres“. Überhaupt stellen viele Werke ganz junger Komponisten auf Hopes jüngstem Album echte Überraschungen dar, so etwa das Stück „Biafra“ vom 1983 geborenen Alex Baranowski oder das Lento des 1973 geborenen Aleksey Igudesman. Eine Entdeckung ist auch der von John Rutter arrangierte „Cantique de Jean Racine“ op. 11 von Gabriel Fauré.
(Deutsche Grammophon/Universal Music)

(Helmut Peters)

 

Heaven and Hell
, 14.02.2013

Toms Schmankerl der Woche

Vom Sphärenklang zum Untergang mit Tom Asam.

 

Der britische Violinist Daniel Hope ist gefeierter Solist und Kammermusiker und darüber hinaus für seine Vielseitigkeit bekannt. Da gibt es schon mal ein Crossover-Projekt mit Sting. Oder wie zuletzt in der Recomposed Serie der Deutschen Grammophon (bei der er seit 2007 exklusiv veröffentlicht) frisches Blut für Vivaldi durch Max Richters gelungene Re-Interpretation der Vier Jahreszeiten. Nun erscheint Spheres, eine musikalische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema Sphärenklänge. Spätestens seit Pythagoras beschäftigen sich Philosophen, Mathematiker und Musiker mit der Vorstellung, dass die Bewegung der Planeten einen Klang erzeugt, dass Musik eine mathematische Grundlage hat, eine Art astronomische Harmonie, die in allem stecke. Hope nimmt sich dieser so romantischen wie faszinierenden Idee an und spannt dabei einen musikalischen Bogen von der Renaissance bis in die Gegenwart, von Westhoff (dessen Einfluss auf Bach er für unterschätzt hält) über Fauré und Glass bis Arvo Pärt, Einaudi und Nyman. Hinzu kommen Ersteinspielungen von Stücken der Komponisten Alex Baranowksi, Gabriel Prokofieff, Alexej Igudesmann und Karsten Gundermann. Eine bezaubernde Idee, die von Hope u.a. mit Jaques Ammon (Piano), dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin und Mitgliedern des Rundfunkorchesters Berlin phantastisch umgesetzt wurde. Ideal, um öfter mal die Bildschirme ausgeschaltet zu lassen und zum Klang dieser Sphärenmusiken in den Nachthimmel zu glotzen. Mein persönlicher Favorit ist Arvo Pärts Fratres – ein Stück, bei dem die Ganzkörper-Gänsehaut in ihrer Heftigkeit im Wettstreit mit den Freudentränen liegt. Galaktisch.

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? Daniel Hope verzaubert mit seiner Geige: CD „Spheres“
The Epoch Times, 28.02.2013

“Komponisten und Werke aus verschiedenen Jahrhunderten zusammenbringen, die man normalerweise nicht in derselben Galaxie findet“, so umschrieb Daniel Hope das Konzept seines neuen Albums, das jüngst bei der Deutschen Grammophon erschienen ist. Der verbindende Gedanke hinter der Musik von „Spheres“ sei die Frage: „Ist da draußen irgendetwas?“

Astronomie fasziniert den britischen Geiger Daniel Hope seit Kindheitstagen und Sternenbeobachtung war neben der Musik seine große Leidenschaft. Da konnte es nicht ausbleiben, dass Hope ein „zeitgemäßes Statement“ zur Sphärenmusik abgeben wollte, jenem seit Urzeiten beschriebenen, selbsterzeugten Klang der Planeten.

Dass „Spheres“ als Konzeptalbum kein Marketing-Gag, sondern eine echte Entdeckungsreise ist, merkt der Hörer spätestens am filigranen Tonfall der CD und ihrer eigenwilligen Zusammenstellung. „Spheres“ vereint musikalische Organismen aus vier Jahrhunderten, ohne nach dem „E“ oder „U“ ihrer Herkunft zu fragen. Und „Spheres“ ist eine jener Sammlungen geworden, die man sehr oft hören kann, ohne dass sie ihren Glanz verliert. Das liegt vor allem an der Qualität der Stücke und ihrer Interpretation, fünf davon sind Weltersteinspielungen, andere speziell neu arrangiert. Sogar Filmmusiken wurden ihrem Entstehungskontext entführt und fanden auf dem Planeten „Kammermusik“ ein neues Zuhause; wegen der Hingabe aller Beteiligten ein künstlerisch glaubwürdiges zumal.

Zu Hopes superbem Geigenspiel gesellen sich Jacques Ammon am Klavier, das Deutsche Kammerorchester Berlin unter Simon Halsey mit kongenialen und ebenbürtigen Streichersolisten, sogar Mitglieder des Rundfunkchores Berlin. Das Klangspektrum, das Daniel Hope seiner Guaneri entlockt, ist faszinierend: Er haucht, singt, schwelgt, spricht mit den Anderen oder ist einsamer Sucher, täuscht Sordinoklänge an, um im nächsten Moment zu vollem Sound aufzublühen, ist Seele der Handlung ohne je selbstgefälliger Virtuose zu sein.

Die CD „Spheres“ hat eine intelligente Dramaturgie, die von einer Ausnahme abgesehen, nahtlos fließt. Sie beginnt mit Bach-Vorläufer Johann Paul von Westhoff („Imitazione delle campane“, ca.1690) in geheimnisvollem Arpeggio-Geflüster und schließt im Heute mit dem fragenden Monolog einer Geige vor dunkler Orchester-Wolkenwand (Karsten Gundermanns „Faust – Episode 2 – Nachspiel“). Zwischen die vielen kurzen Stücke fügt sich „Fratres“, ein rund zwölfminütiger und atemberaubender Arvo Pärt. Ludovico Enaudis „I giorni“ und „Passaggio“ entpuppen sich als wahre Perlen. Karl Jenkins „Benedictus“ wird zum rührenden Dialog von Geige und Chor, der in großem Pathos gipfelt, das hier jedoch zarter und zerbrechlicher als im Original erklingt. Das dreieinhalbminütige Herzstück „Spheres“ von Gabriel Prokofiev behandelt als atonalste Komposition das Thema der Planetenbewegung als sich mechanisch verschiebende Stimmen, zwischen denen Harmonie und Dissonanz entsteht.

Alles ist wunderbar stimmig, bis auf ein Kuschelklassik-Ei, das sich Hope laut Booklet mit voller Absicht selbst gelegt hat: Es ist der „Cantique de Jean Racine“ von Gabriel Fauré, den er während seiner Schulzeit öfter gesungen hat und ereilt den Hörer auf Track 4: Nachdem die Gehörgänge gerade mit minimalistischen Achtelbewegungen von Philip Glass massiert wurden und man langsam in die subtile Klangwelt der CD hineingeschwebt ist, wirkt das spätromantische Chorwerk mit seinen Schmelzklängen und weihnachtlichem Charakter süßlich triefend und wie Creme Bruleé auf nüchternen Magen – obwohl es beispielhaft gesungen ist! Zu allem Überfluss schweigt hier die erwartete Solovioline, mit deren ätherischen Flageoletts es danach weitergeht, als wäre nichts gewesen. Der einzige Ausreißer auf der sonst sehr schlüssigen CD „Spheres“.

„Spheres“ dürfte ein Verkaufserfolg werden, weil das Album Heiterkeit ausstrahlt, die sanft vitalisierend wirkt und sich für alle Lebenslagen eignet. Und auch besonders für Menschen, die nachts absichtlich wachbleiben um Sterne zu beobachten oder Musik zu hören.

Rosemarie Frühauf

Mit Daniel Hope in den Kosmos schweben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 02.03.2013

von Ernst Strobl

Im Fernsehprogramm wird er so angekündigt: „Einer der besten Geiger der Welt ist Daniel Hope. Bereits mit elf Jahren trat der britische Musiker mit Yehudi Menuhin auf, der ihn einmal als seinen musikalischen Enkel bezeichnete. Über 100 Konzerte gibt Daniel Hope jedes Jahr, immer mit dabei ist seine Guarneri-Geige von 1742 . . .“ Okay, er ist Geiger, aber das ist längst nicht al les. Daniel Hope ist wohl so etwas wie ein Tausendsassa. Neben der weltumspannenden Konzerttätigkeit ist er seit zehn Jahren Künstlerischer Leiter des Savannah Musical Festivals in Georgia, sein Amt als Künstlerischer Direktor des Festivals Mecklenburg-Vorpommern legt er heuer nach vielen Jahren nieder.

Und natürlich nimmt Hope CDs auf. Soeben ist eine der faszinierendsten Aufnahmen der jüngeren Zeit erschienen, mit denen Hope die Hörer wahrhaft in höhere Sphären entführt. Ihn an seinem neuen Wohnsitz Wien anzutreffen, ist nicht einfach. Vor ein paar Tagen passte es. Hope kam eben von Konzerten aus den USA zurück, wo er auch den 89-jährigen Pianisten Menahem Pressler besuchte, der ihn vor Jahren zum Beaux Arts Trio geholt hatte. Es folgte ein Abend mit Klaus Maria Brandauer in Zürich, Wien diente zum Umsteigen nach Göteborg, wo er am Donnerstag mit dem Britten-Violinkonzert bejubelt wurde. Heute, Samstag, ist Hope im SWR Fernsehen zu sehen.

„Spheres“ ist der Titel der CD, ist das was für Esoteriker? Ja, das habe er gern, sagt Hope. Es sei eine schöne Vorstellung, dass Planeten bei ihrer „Begegnung“ Sphärenklänge erzeugten. Hörbarer funktioniert das auf der Geige, wo Reibung Töne erzeugt. Und was für welche! Hope achtete auf die Dramaturgie bei der Auswahl der 18 Stücke. Begleitet vom Dirigenten Simon Hal sey, Kammerorchester, Chor oder Klavier zieht er fragile, innige oder glänzende Fäden über fast filmische Musik vom Barock über Phil Glass bis zu Arvo Pärt, Lera Auerbach und Ludovico Einaudi. Eine intensive, geglückte Entdeckungsreise – auch ohne Sternenhimmel zum Rauf- und Runterhören schön.

CD. Daniel Hope, „Spheres“, u. a. mit Jacques Ammon, Klavier, Deutsches Kammerorchester Berlin, Rundfunkchor Berlin. Deutsche Grammophon. TV. Daniel Hope zu Gast bei Frank Elstner. SWR, Samstag, 21.50 Uhr.

Wien ist ein Rückzugsort
Wiener Zeitung, 11.04.2013

Stargeiger und Entertainer Daniel Hope ist weltweit unterwegs und in Wien zu Hause

Von Daniel Wagner

Was dem Stargeiger und Wahlwiener Daniel Hope an seinem Wohnsitz gefällt.

Wien. Frühstück im Dritten. Kann eine Stadt inspirieren? Daniel Hope stimmt zu. Hier kann er alles aufsaugen, die Vergangenheit ist so gegenwärtig wie nirgendwo anders. Wobei die Besonderheit für den Stargeiger die Mischung macht. Wien sei eindeutig ein Schmelztiegel, mitten in Europa, die Nähe zum Balkan, die türkische Vergangenheit. Bei allen Unterschieden verwenden dennoch alle irgendwie die gleiche Sprache. “Abgesehen davon bin ich wahrscheinlich der weltgrößte Fan von Jugendstil”, sagt Hope und lacht.

Natürlich kann Wien für einen Musiker das Zentrum der Welt sein. Allein wenn er durch die City geht und Gedenktafeln von Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven bis zurück zu Vivaldi seinen Weg kreuzen, kann er nur staunen.

Journalistische Triebkräfte
Hat Wien für ihn nicht zu musealen Charakter? Der medial erfahrene Publikumsliebling schüttelt den Kopf. Durch das Wissen um die kulturelle Vergangenheit habe gerade hierzulande die Kultur einen besonderen Stellenwert inne. Denn in der gegenwärtigen Krise wird weltweit bekanntlich zuerst an der Kultur gespart. Zwei Ausnahmen fallen nach Hope hier auf: Deutschland und besonders Österreich, wo die Wertschätzung den Kunstschaffenden gegenüber vorbildlich sei.

Apropos Deutschland: Die Fernsehlandschaft der Nachbarn erkor ihn in den letzten Jahren gerne zum moderierenden Musiker. Klassik erklärt aus dem Mund des Praktikers. Wie wurde man auf seine Entertainer-Qualitäten aufmerksam? Dass er journalistische Triebkräfte hat, wurde ihm schon als Herausgeber der Schulzeitung im südafrikanischen Durban bewusst. Dann das eigentliche Geschäft: Yehudi Menuhin förderte ihn während und nach dem Studium am Londoner Royal College of Music. 2002 folgte er dem Ruf des immer umtriebigen Menahem Pressler (unlängst gab der 89-jährige Pianist sein Wiener Solodebüt). Hope wurde der letzte Geiger des legendären Beaux Arts Trios. Woran er bei dem Ensemblegründer denkt? “Wenn Pressler spielt, ist er einfach Musik. Dieses Gefühl kann nur er verbreiten.” Daneben die internationale Solokarriere. Zum Fernsehen kam er aus purem Zufall. Ein Regisseur bei Arte bat ihn während Dreharbeiten, nicht nur zu spielen, sondern auch zu moderieren. Und es hat Spaß gemacht.

Immer wieder Wien. Auch persönliche Gründe zogen ihn hierher, lebt doch die Mutter seit 20 Jahren mit ihrem zweiten Mann, dem Sänger Benno Schollum, in der Stadt. So schließt sich der Kreis zur komplexen Familienhistorie, Hope bezieht sich väterlicherseits auf katholisch-irische Vorfahren, mütterlicherseits führen die Wurzeln ganz deutlich nach Wien. Genauso wie nach Berlin. Die deutsch-jüdische Provenienz wurde der Familie zum Verhängnis. Ribbentrop persönlich enteignete einen Urgroßvater und machte dessen Berliner Villa zur Dechiffrierstation der Nazis. Der andere, seines Zeichens erfolgreicher Journalist, begrüßte den Machtwechsel. Bis er merkte, dass er “Volljude” war und Selbstmord beging. Der Urenkel feiert im heutigen Deutschland große Erfolge. Gibt es Schatten der Vergangenheit? “Ich liebe das Land, arbeite gerne dort, aber Wien gibt mir die nötige Distanz zur Familiengeschichte.”

“Ich habe das Gefühl, dass oft 300 verschiedene Projekte gleichzeitig durch meinen Kopf schwirren. Ich schnappe etwas auf, manches liegt Jahrzehnte, vieles wird verwirklicht.” Beispielsweise sein unlängst veröffentlichten Album “Spheres”: Schon als Kind liebt er sein Teleskop, über Yehudi Menuhin lernte er den US-Astronomen Carl Sagan kennen und erfuhr von Sphärenmusik, neulich hörte er eine Radiosendung darüber, und währenddessen entstand das Konzept für die Aufnahmen. Es ist Musik zum Ausspannen, fernab des tagtäglichen Wahnsinns. “Wo wir doch so klein in der Milchstraße sind, müssen wir uns die begründete Frage stellen, was es noch da draußen gibt.”

What’s Still Timeless About ‘Seasons’
The Wall Street Journal, 23.08.2013

By DANIEL HOPE – I first experienced Vivaldi as a toddler at Yehudi Menuhin’s festival in Gstaad, Switzerland, in 1975. One day I heard what I thought was birdsong coming from the stage. It was the opening solo of “La Primavera” from the “Four Seasons.” It had such an electrifying effect that I still call it my “Vivaldi Spring.” How was it possible to conjure up so vivid, so natural a sound, with just a violin?

Opinions of Vivaldi divide between those who adore and those who despise him. Ask the average person if he recognizes a classical melody, however poorly hummed, and he will probably nod enthusiastically at the second theme of “Spring” from the “Four Seasons.” On the other hand, Igor Stravinsky summed up the case for the other side when he quipped, “Vivaldi wrote one concerto, 400 times.”

Yes, Vivaldi was incredibly prolific. Nonetheless, his most famous work remains his “Four Seasons.” To understand this masterpiece, it helps to shed a little light on the rise and fall of one of the greatest violinists of the 18th century. Born in Venice in 1678 into a desperately poor family, Vivaldi chose the priesthood early on—it offered good chances of advancement. But his plans were scuppered when his severe asthma meant that he was unable to conduct long masses and because, gossip has it, he would nip out for a glass of something during the sermon.

What changed his life forever was an unusual job offer. In 1703 a Venetian orphanage, the Ospedale della Pietà, which provided musical training to the illegitimate and abandoned young daughters of wealthy noblemen, asked Vivaldi to direct its orchestra. Vivaldi understood immediately that he had a unique ensemble at his disposal. Many of his greatest works were written for these young ladies to perform. Very soon, all Europe was enthralled.

He remained there for 12 years and, after an itinerant period working in Vicenza and Mantua, returned to Venice in 1723. The 1720s were a difficult time. The bursting of the “South Sea Bubble” triggered a recession that spread across Europe. Vivaldi needed an income. So in 1723 he set about writing a series of works he boldly titled “Il Cimento dell’ Armonia e dell’invenzione” (“The trial of harmony and invention”), Opus 8. It consists of 12 concerti, seven of which—”Spring,” “Summer,” “Autumn” and “Winter” (which make up the “Four Seasons”), “Pleasure,” “The Hunt” and “Storm at Sea”—paint astonishingly vivid, vibrant scenes. In “Storm at Sea,” Vivaldi reached a new level of virtuosity, pushing technical mastery to the limit as the violinist’s fingers leap and shriek across the fingerboard, recalling troubled waters.

In the score, each of the four seasons are prefaced by four sonnets, possibly Vivaldi’s own, that establish each concerto as a musical image of that season. At the top of every movement, Vivaldi gives us a written description of what we are about to hear. These range from “the blazing sun’s relentless heat, men and flocks are sweltering” (“Summer”) to peasant celebrations (“Autumn”) in which “the cup of Bacchus flows freely, and many find their relief in deep slumber.” Images of warmth and wine are wonderfully intertwined. When the faithful hound “barks” in the slow movement of “Spring,” we experience it just as clearly as the patter of raindrops on the roof in the largo of “Winter.” No composer of the time got music to sing, speak and depict quite like this.

Vivaldi’s fame spread. He received commissions from King Louis XV of France and Rome’s Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni. When Prince Johann Ernst returned to his court at Weimar from an Italian tour, he brought with him a selection of Vivaldi’s earlier, 12-concerto “L’Estro Armonico” (“Harmonic Inspiration”) and presented it to the young organist Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach was so taken with the music that he rearranged several of the concertos for different instrumentation. A legend was born. Johann Friedrich Armand von Uffenbach exclaimed: “Vivaldi played a solo accompaniment—splendid—to which he appended a cadenza which really frightened me, for such playing has never been nor can be: he brought his fingers up to only a straw’s distance from the bridge, leaving no room for the bow—and that on all four strings with imitations and incredible speed.”

But Vivaldi’s fame was eventually to become his greatest enemy. People said that “Il Prete rosso” (“the red priest,” due to his flowing red locks) was surely in league with the devil—seducing those poor defenseless orphans, whose corsets he untied with a mere flick of his bow. The pope threatened him with excommunication. Suddenly, he was out of fashion. Once again he was broke. In May 1740, he headed to Vienna, where Emperor Charles VI had once offered him a position. He died there a year later, and was buried in a pauper’s grave.

Centuries passed. Dust gathered on the red priest’s music. A revival of sorts began when scholars in Dresden began to uncover Vivaldi manuscripts in the 1920s. But what really redeemed him was the record industry. Alfredo Campoli released a live recording of the “Four Seasons” in 1939. But, at least indirectly, the greatest revival of the “Seasons” occurred thanks to Hollywood. Louis Kaufman, an American violinist and concertmaster for more than 400 movie soundtracks, including “Gone With the Wind” and “Cleopatra,” recorded the “Four Seasons” for the Concert Hall Society. It won the 1950 Grand Prix du Disque.

Today the “Four Seasons,” with more than 1,000 available recordings, are not just rediscovered—they are being reimagined. Astor Piazzolla, Uri Caine, Philip Glass and others have all created their own versions. In Spring 2012, I received an enigmatic call from the British composer Max Richter, who said he wanted to “recompose” the “Four Seasons” for me. His problem, he explained, was not with the music, but how we have treated it. We are subjected to it in supermarkets, elevators or when a caller puts you on hold. Like many of us, he was deeply fond of the “Seasons” but felt a degree of irritation at the music’s ubiquity. He told me that because Vivaldi’s music is made up of regular patterns, it has affinities with the seriality of contemporary postminimalism, one style in which he composes. Therefore, he said, the moment seemed ideal to reimagine a new way of hearing it.

I had always shied away from recording Vivaldi’s original. There are simply too many other versions already out there. But Mr. Richter’s reworking meant listening again to what is constantly new in a piece we think we are hearing when, really, we just blank it out. The album, “Recomposed By Max Richter: Four Seasons,” was released late last year. With his old warhorse refitted for the 21st century, the inimitable red priest rides again.

article appeared August 23, 2013, on page C13 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal



  all press reviews

Print Interviews

2014


Daniel Hope liebt die ganz besondere Schwingung
Westfälische Nachrichten, 21.02.2014

Steinfurt – Violinvirtuose Daniel Hope hat jetzt zweimal die Bearbeitung von Vivaldis „Vier Jahreszeiten“ von Max Richter in der Bagno-Konzertgalerie gespielt. Mit unserem Redaktionsmitglied Hans Lüttmann sprach er darüber.

Mr. Hope, Sie haben Vivaldis „Vier Jahreszeiten“ einmal „eines der heiligsten Stücke der Musikgeschichte“ genannt. Was bedeutet das nun für einen Violinisten?
Daniel Hope: Dass er es wie kaum ein anderes Stück in- und auswendig kennt, ja, dass es sich sozusagen in sein Gehirn eingebrannt hat. Ich selber spiele es seit meinem achten Lebensjahr. Und eben hier im Bagno bei der Zugabe, wo wir das original Vivaldi-Presto aus dem Sommer gespielt haben, puh, da hatte ich echte Probleme, nicht wieder in die Richter-Komposition zu rutschen.

 

Als Max Richter Sie gefragt hat, ob Sie seine recomposed, also neu komponierte Fassung aufnehmen wollten, was bedeutete das?
Hope: Vor allem ganz viel üben. Was Richter da komponiert hat, ist zwar annähernd 90 Prozent Richter, aber oft liegt seine Komposition doch nur einen Hauch neben dem Original.
Eröffnet so ein Stück modern interpretierter Klassik eigentlich auch jungen Leuten den Zugang zu einer Musik, die sie oft als altbacken und verstaubt abtun?
Hope: Oh ja, wenn ich an eines unserer Konzerte neulich in London denke, da waren viele 25-, 30- und 35-Jährige, die diesen Vivaldi total toll fanden. Man muss dazu auch wissen, das Max Richter in England sehr populär ist.

Anders ist doch sicher auch dieser kleine Saal, der gerade mal 250 Zuhörern Platz bietet?
Hope: Aber das macht überhaupt keinen Unterschied; ich liebe diese kleinen Säle. Ich möchte natürlich die Carnegie Hall nicht missen, aber hier, wo ich schon zum ich glaube fünften Mal spiele, da spüre ich diese Vibes, ich weiß kein deutsches Wort dafür, diese ganz besondere Schwingung.
Etwas Besonderes klemmt da ja auch auf Ihrem Notenständer, ein Heft ist es nicht.
Hope: Nein, das ist ein iPad. Unten habe ich Fußpedale, mit denen ich die Noten weiterblättern kann. Eine wirklich tolle Sache, eine App für zweifünfzig, aber da stecken ganze Partituren drin.

Distant Drum
Classic Feel (en), 01.05.2014

While Daniel Hope was recently on a short visit to Cape Town, Lore Watterson caught up with this multifaceted artist and talked to him about the many different projects he is involved with, including A Distant Drum, which he is preparing together with his father (the South African author Christopher Hope). This portrays the musical history of a dark time for South Africa, but one lit by defiance, music, wit and style.

“I think any musician can learn an enormous amount from a great actor through the way they deliver a phrase, and he really manipulates his voice in the most extraordinary way”

Lore Watterson: You are celebrated in the media as a British violinist, looking at your history, how do you see yourself?

Daniel Hope: That’s a very good question actually. I see myself as European. Of course I’m South African born, so my soul is here, it always has been. But I spend so little time here, you know we left when I was a baby, I grew up in England so I sound English and I went to school there, so my earliest influences and musical abilities are all associated with London. But I’ve lived out of the UK for so many years. When I was 18 or 19 I went to Lübeck to study, and then to Hamburg. Then I went to Amsterdam, and now I live in Vienna so I’ve always had this peripatetic existence, but Europe is where I really feel at home. I don’t tend to differentiate between where that is, I just love Europe. I love travelling, I love coming back here and I love travelling to other places but my old soul is Europe. And certainly German-speaking Europe because, on my mother’s side, there is such a strong German connection.

LW: You have published books in German about a Jewish family living in Germany. Is it about your mother’s family?

DH: Yes, it was a very strong Jewish family going back to the 15th century in Potsdam and Berlin, and they converted to Christianity in the 19th century, as many did, and were fiercely patriotic Germans until the Nuremburg Gazette where they were no longer Germans. As a result they lost everything and had to flee, so most of them came to South Africa, some to America, but my grandmother came here.

LW: How important is the ‘Jewishness’ in your family?

DH: For me personally, it is very important because it’s at least half of my identity. On the other hand I’m an extremely unusual mixture; my father is Roman Catholic, my mother is Protestant, although she has this very strong Jewish background. On the Jewish side, in particular my mother’s family, and the first book I’ve written is about the family and the house in Berlin, which is a fascinating house and the story of what happened to this house. It took me on a journey to discover more of my Jewish roots and they go back so far, back to the first rabbi of Potsdam. We were actually related, so there’s no escape from my Jewish roots. I don’t identify myself as Jewish although I have great empathy towards the Jewish religion and to that genetic makeup in me.

LW: There are lovely traditions that are part of celebrations…

DH: Absolutely, and the music of course: the violin is one of the ultimate instruments. The whole idea of children singing with their mothers, the accompanying violin is always present. It’s something very close to the Jewish soul and I identify greatly with that.

LW: Besides writing, I see you’ve done some very interesting projects with Klaus Maria Brandauer, for example, you performed Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s letters together.

DH: They’re amazing, they are the letters from Aus der Haft as he was in the prison in Tegel and awaiting his execution. They are the most extraordinary documents, because on the one hand, they are the letters home to his family where he maintains this angelic reverence; and then there are his diaries where he speaks his feelings and his mind, which are of course terrifying. The juxtaposition of course with Brandauer, who is such a great actor, is that we do performances together where he will read and I will play, and the emotions within the letters and the diaries, I try to match in the music that I play. We have music and text, and we try to bring these genres together. There are moments where I will improvise to his voice, as his voice has the most amazing colours, and then there are moments of pure music and pure text. He is one of my closest friends, we’ve worked together for the last 15 years, and for me he’s one of the greatest actors in the world. I think any musician can learn an enormous amount from a great actor through the way they deliver a phrase, and he really manipulates his voice in the most extraordinary way.

LW: You did Goethe’s Faust as well? Of course Brandauer being such a famous Mephisto.

DH: Yes, we did, and the Soldier’s Tale of Stravinsky. We also did a wonderful evening called Böhmen liegt am Meer, which is a story of the Czech Republic from the middle ages up to present day, with texts by Czech poets and music by Dvořák and Janáček. We’ve also done a Don Juan evening together. We usually meet four or five times a year to do one or two projects. I admire him enormously and he was one of the first great actors I worked with, and the first one to try new forms of presentation and trying to find a hybrid. That’s actually why I’m here in Cape Town for this new project I’m doing with my father, which is also going to be a totally new form of music and visual presentation.

It’s a project for Carnegie Hall, they’re doing a big South African festival in October this year, which will be 18 or 19 days with an amazing collection of South African artists, musicians, dancers etc. They’re all being shipped over to Carnegie Hall. Carnegie came to me about a year ago and asked me to come up with something, whatever I wanted, as long as it was big. So the first person I called was my dad, and I told him it was time we did something together. I’ve always admired his writing and I’ve always wondered if there was a way for us to get together. He was thrilled at the idea, so I told him to come up with the story and then we’d piece it together from there. He came back and told me there was someone he wanted to write about, and that was Nat Nakaza. He was one of the great literary voices of the 60s. He was with Drum magazine, and was forced out of this country and went to New York, but he became disillusioned with America and killed himself. So my dad had always been fascinated by Nakaza’s story and wanted to find a way to tell the story. I was only too pleased and said I’d get the music together. I went to Carnegie Hall, they loved it. I told them I’d love to, in a sense, create a modern day South African soldier’s tale. You take the idea of a piece to be sung, danced, semi-staged, so it’s not music theatre, or an opera or a concert – it’s a tale that’s told and somehow illustrated with music. All of this based on Nat Nakaza. Carnegie took it like a shot, so I called Andrew Tracey and asked him to be a musical guide, as I needed help to get the sounds of that time. We decided we needed two actors, so we chose John Kani’s son, Atandwa Kani, who is very talented – he will play Nat Nakaza. The second actor is a fantastic young Afrikaans actor named Christiaan Schoombie and he will be the counterpart, almost like the devil quality. We have a wonderful theatre producer, Mannie Manim, and it will be played in Bloemfontein on the 13th and 14th of October this year, and the Carnegie Hall performance will be the 28th of October. After that I’d like it to go around the world as I think it has the potential to be something very special. I believe Nakaza is not as well known as he should be, perhaps even forgotten about, and yet his wit, energy, rhythm and take on life and apartheid was so singular. His humour and his restraint, was yet so biting. My father has written this beautiful, poignant, dramatic play, and it’s my job to bring these people together. I have some fantastic musicians as well, such as Jason Marsalis, brother of Wynton Marsalis, as well as a young French cellist, François Sarhan, who works a lot with Sting. So that’s the reason I’m here; My father turned 70 yesterday, and I’m meeting up with Mannie.

LW: Why did you choose Bloemfontein?

DH: We have an excellent director, Jerry Mofokeng, and one of his main gigs is at the theatre in Bloemfontein. Tom Morris, who also did War Horse, is very interested in taking it.

LW: I’ve interviewed a lot of musicians, and what I found very interesting about you is that you manage to do it with your music and you are breaking out doing other things as well. Is that something you feel, that you need different outlets other than playing the violin?

DH: Yes I do, and we were raised that way by my father, to always have an opinion. He encouraged us to write, and I started at the age of 14 or 15 (writing for school papers), and I quickly realised writing was an extension of music for me. When I made my first few CDs I interviewed the composers and wrote the booklet text, which at the time was very unusual. Early in my 20s I started the Theresienstadt Project (also known by its Czech name as Terezín), a garrison town 60 km north of Prague, the central collection point or ghetto for between 50 000 and 60 000 Czech Jews) and interviewing survivors. This all led to what I do now, I am now writing my fourth book, which is about composers who fled Europe and went to Hollywood. I’ve just completed a new album which is coming out at the end of the year, featuring those composers from the 1930s and 40s. I’m going to LA next month to interview some surviving composers from that time.

LW: When you were young, was it your desire to play an instrument, or your parents?

DH: Yes it was me. My parents didn’t know much about music other than that they loved it. We left South Africa because my father’s books were banned here, so we went to England. My father took teaching jobs to make ends meet, but we ran out of money. My mother had trained as a secretary in SA, and she went to an agency who had two job offers, one being the secretary to Yehudi Menuhin. It was meant to be just for six months but six months became 26 years, and so in a split second our lives changed. Had that not happened we’d be living in South Africa and things would be very different. So my mom would take me with her to work everyday, which was Yehudi’s house, and I would listen to the music all day, and not just Menuhin’s – it was the people who came there, like Ravi Shankar. At the age of four, it was probably not a great surprise when I said I’d like to be a violinist. My mom found a lady nearby who specialised in teaching young kids and I started with her and that’s what ignited that spark. Then when I was about 15, Menuhin took an interest as he realised I was actually serious about this. Then when I was 18, I realised I didn’t just want to be a violinist, I wanted to be a musician.

LW: …and so much more than ‘the British violinist Daniel Hope’. CF

So many strings to his bow…
www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk/so-many-strings-to-his-bow/ (en), 18.08.2014

From bestselling albums and intoxicating live performances, to books, films and charitable projects, Daniel Hope is so much more than a violinist. His appearances at the Bristol Proms have left audiences breathless and charmed in equal measure, for Daniel’s exquisite skill with the violin is matched by his warm stage presence and ability to really connect with an audience. It is some twelve years since Daniel was last on stage at St George’s, so his return is long overdue; and it is in these interim years that the musician, writer, producer and activist has truly made his name.

In October St George’s becomes the focus of four nights of live broadcasts by BBC Radio 3 as the Brahms Experience unfolds. With concerts by Skampa Quartet, the BBC Singers and pianist Stephen Kovacevich, not to mention a sojourn to Colston Hall with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, it’s a week-long celebration of one of classical music’s more misunderstood and underestimated composers. Brahms is so much more than a magnificent beard, or that lullaby…

Daniel’s contribution takes in one of Brahms’ closest friends and greatest muses, the violinist Joseph Joachim; with music by both, alongside works by Mendelssohn and Schumann.

We caught up with Daniel last month to discuss who Joseph Joachim was, why he’s so important to Brahms’ music and what audiences can expect from the concert in October.

- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – -

Daniel, we’re so looking forward to having you with us in October; when was the last time you performed at St George’s?

It was quite a while ago; it was with Paul Watkins and Philip Dukes, we did a Theresienstadt programme. This was probably twelve years ago… at least.

What can you tell us about this long awaited next visit?

It’s an homage to Joseph Joachim, who was the most instrumental and important violinist I think of the nineteenth century. He was somebody that, in so many ways, defined what the violin meant. Firstly he taught over five hundred students, he created the Royal Conservatory in Berlin; he famously introduced the young Brahms to the Schumann family and he was the one who rediscovered the Beethoven Violin Concerto. He made a very conscious decision, having studied Mendelssohn, when Mendelssohn died he moved in a sense to the other side, to Liszt – he became his concert master – and broke very famously with Liszt and crossed again to the other side and that was Schumann, Brahms and Dvořák, all of whom wrote violin concertos for him, including Max Bruch, and that’s why we have those concertos and we don’t have a violin concerto by Wagner, by Liszt. So he was really a forerunner in so many ways, his programming was exceptional; it was what we call ‘cutting edge’ nowadays, mixing genres, putting in symphonies next to chamber music, next to solo stuff, two hundred years before anybody else was doing it and he was a composer in his own right. So the concert looks at all these different influences; it looks at his composition, it looks at pieces that were written for him and it looks at his friends, so Mendelssohn, Brahms, Edvard Grieg…

But despite all of that, it’s a name that not many people would actually recognise? Is Joachim overlooked or forgotten?

I think, you know, at the end of the day it is composers whose names go down in history not interpreters, and that’s the way it is; and I think that’s the right thing because, you know, the composers write things that stay and we’re there to interpret them and share them. There was a time where everybody knew Joachim, but times have changed and his style of playing, his way of doing things I think fell out of fashion at the beginning of the twentieth century – even though he was the first violinist to actually record. There are rolls from 1904 of him, wax rolls, you can actually hear him, it’s amazing. So he was actually pretty advanced, but he belonged to the old guard and he was superseded by glittering violinists like Jascha Heifetz, Yehudi Menuhin, Mischa Elman… It became more about the personality and the brilliance and the perfection, and less about the communication and the feeling of the music. So I think it was just time that took its toll on his name really. And yet there are so many hundreds of pieces that we have because of him, thanks to him.

And this concert is of course part of a five night celebration of Brahms… Is he a composer you enjoy performing?

I absolutely adore Brahms, I just couldn’t live without Brahms… I mean, his chamber music is just incredible; the piano quartets, the piano trios, the piano quintets, the sextets… where do you start and where do you stop? I just can’t get enough of it and I play a lot of his music; I’m touring two piano quartets next year. It’s got something which is so personal and so emotional, and yet it’s controlled as well; that’s the thing about Brahms, he’s a master of control and there’s just nothing quite like it. And, you know, Joachim was – for the most part of his life – his closest musical friend and they broke, split, and then at the end of their lives got back together and the present he gave Joachim was the Double Concerto. I mean what a present! So Joachim really accompanied his whole life and when Brahms thought of the violin, he was thinking of Joachim.

Do you think that Brahms is underestimated as a composer?

I think maybe he’s not everybody’s cup of tea, although he never was, funnily enough. Menahem Pressler, of the Beaux Art Trio, the pianist, he told me he went to play for Darius Milhaud back in the early forties and Mihaud asked him what he’d like to play. He said ‘I have some Debussy’ and Milhaud said ‘Great’, and then he said ‘I have some Brahms…’ and Mihaud said ‘Brahms?! Ha, that Beerhouse composer?!’ I’d never heard Brahms referred to as a Beerhouse composer, but there were people who thought he was unsophisticated and I think some of his works are overlooked; and yet look at the symphonies, look at the violin concerto, look at the piano concertos, to name a few.. incredible. He was such a perfectionist; it was once said that he threw a number of his works into the fire, apparently another four of five violin sonatas, cello sonatas, all the rest of it… he was never happy. But for me, if I had to really choose a genre it’s the chamber music; the chamber music is so incredibly broad, from the sonatas – violin, piano, cello sonatas – the clarinet trio, the horn trio, piano quartets, piano quintets… it’s one piece after the next, every single one is a masterpiece, every one, and that’s amazing.

You’re doing this concert with Sebastian Knauer, with whom you’ve worked a lot – are those kinds of ongoing collaborations important to you?

Very. I’ve worked with Sebastian for twenty years now, we’re very close friends and we travel a lot around the world and he’s a phenomenal pianist and a great musician, great partner. We devise these programmes ourselves, we sit down and work out what we want to do and how we want to do it. Particularly for Brahms you need to have a fine pianist, because these sonatas really the emphasis is on the piano; Brahms was a master pianist himself and so the piano in a sense controls the pieces. So you need to have somebody who has weight and who has real knowledge and also an empathy to it. Brahms was born in Hamburg and Sebastian comes from Hamburg as well; it’s a particular place and he feels very close to him, so I wouldn’t want to do this programme with anyone else.

St George’s of course has a fantastic acoustic; how important is a venue to your performance? Can it inspire you?

Absolutely, I mean there’s nothing nicer than when it all connects; the venue, the audience, the programme and the connection between the audience and what you get back from them – it’s a two-way conversation that’s going on. I do remember the concert we did at St George’s and I remember this magnificent acoustic, and it being very flattering for string players; you have this resonance there, but not too much, so the instruments can really sing and I think for this programme it will be just ideal.

You’re well known for a kind of ‘Musical Activism’… what other issues are out there which would benefit from a bit of musical activisim?

A lot, I mean where do you start? One thing that I think is fascinating and which is extremely important is music therapy, and what music can actually do… That’s not activism, that’s just helping, in a sense; disabled people, autistic children, senile people, alzheimers. It’s incredible the effect that music can have. People who literally don’t know anything anymore – who they are, who their loved ones are – will suddenly recite a song for you with perfect lyrics. There’s something about the connection between the brain and music which I think is amazing; the same with Autistic children, it’s had an incredibly beneficial effect on their peace of mind and on their development. So I think that’s something which needs to be pushed, actually; we need more soloists to get in on it and help and use their names to do things like that. I would link that to music education, as the next biggest problem around the world because it’s just been cut from most curriculums. So that’s a major thing that I spend a lot of time on, working for other children’s charities at children’s concerts or a number of different organisations within Europe that give instruments to kids, or give them the chance to come into contact with music – and not just classical music, music in general, music, dance, singing. Those sorts of things I’m involved with and I do a lot for the music of the composers that were murdered by the Nazis; for example, I made a film about Theresienstadt that came out last year and just this week I did a concert in Munich – a benefit concert – fundraising for families of these composers, to support them. The list is long and there are a lot of very worthy causes and I think it doesn’t take all that much actually to give a bit of help here and there.

And away from that, what’s coming next for you?

I’m about to launch a big new album for Deutsche Gramophon, it’s called Escape to Paradise and it’s about the composers who fled Europe and went to Hollywood and created the ‘Hollywood Sound’. It starts in fact before they were forced out, so it starts with the eleven year old Korngold, with bits of his Pantomime and then it goes into his Violin Concerto and then it goes into the film music of the thirties and forties, so there’s things like Ben-Hur, there’s Suspicion the Hitchcock film, then it also looks at Hanns Eisler and Kurt Weill and Franz Waxman, and I have a couple of very special guests on the album. Sting is singing a song by Hans Eisler and there’s a German chanson singer called Max Raabe who is singing a Kurt Weill song. So it’s a very broad mosaic of, in a sense, a search for the Hollywood Sound – where did it come from, and this whole European tradition which was forced out and created something very special. So that comes out in September and there’s lots of projects linked to that, touring, recording, writing, producing, filming… all sorts.

We understand you also play the Saxophone… are we likely to see you at St George’s doing a Sax recital any time soon?

(laughs) I did at some point, when I was about thirteen or fourteen. You wouldn’t want to hear it, put it that way!

Exil „Beide Urgroßväter haben im Ersten Weltkrieg für Deutschland gekämpft.“
Süddeutsche Zeitung (de), 25.08.2014

DANIEL HOPE ÜBER
Exil „Beide Urgroßväter haben im Ersten Weltkrieg für Deutschland gekämpft.“ „Das Letzte, was ich wollte, war Champagner trinken. Aber es gab kein Entrinnen…“ „Ich habe mir eine Zeitmaschine verschafft, damit ich die Musik besser verstehe.“ Zur Person

Interview: Gabriela Herpell

SZ: Sie sind in Südafrika geboren, in London aufgewachsen, leben in Wien. Wo gehören Sie hin?

Daniel Hope: Wenn ich meine Zugehörigkeit wirklich definieren müsste, würde ich mich wohl als Europäer bezeichnen. Aber meine ersten 20 Jahre habe ich in London verbracht, habe also die klassische englische Erziehung genossen. Ich spreche wie ein Brite, ich verfolge die englischen Nachrichten, gucke BBC, obwohl ich lange schon nicht mehr in London lebe.

In der deutschen Sprache gibt es das Wort Heimat, das sich auf ein reales Zuhause genauso beziehen kann wie auf ein geistiges.

In diesem Sinn wäre eben Europa und nicht England meine Heimat. Ich fühle mich genauso wohl in Deutschland, England oder Österreich – wo ich jetzt wohne – wie in Spanien oder Frankreich. Obwohl man natürlich auf große Unterschiede zwischen den Ländern trifft. Gerade das finde ich schön. Das fehlt mir in Amerika, so gern ich auch dort bin.

Das klingt fast zu vernünftig. Spüren Sie keine Zugehörigkeit durch die frühen Prägungen? Sie haben dieselben Fernsehserien geschaut, die gleichen Kinderbücher gelesen wie andere Engländer, nicht wie die Franzosen.

Ich habe in vielen Ländern gelebt und die jeweiligen Eigenarten schnell adaptiert. Ich habe in Lübeck studiert, das Norddeutsche ist mir sehr vertraut. Durch das erste Buch, das ich geschrieben habe, „Familienstücke“, habe ich die Verbindung zu Deutschland erst richtig wahrgenommen.

In dem Buch beschreiben Sie die Suche nach Ihren Urgroßeltern in Berlin. Was ist passiert?

Mein Großvater wurde Anfang 1934 von der SS in Berlin zusammengeschlagen. Er arbeitete am Deutschen Theater als Lichtregieassistent bei Max Reinhardt. Er hat sofort gewusst, was los war, hat seinen Koffer gepackt und Deutschland verlassen. Max Reinhardt sagte noch zu ihm, kommen Sie nach Hollywood, ich werde einen schönen Film machen. Den „Sommernachtstraum“. Mein Großvater sagte, dass er sich geehrt fühlte, aber so weit wie möglich weg wollte von Hitler. Hollywood hat ihm nicht gereicht, darum ging er nach Südafrika.

Ging er allein?

Seine Eltern haben nicht geglaubt, dass es so schlimm kommen würde. Seine Mutter ist 1939 in letzter Minute aus Deutschland weg. Mein Urgroßvater konnte sich nicht vorstellen, Deutschland zu verlassen, und nahm sich lieber das Leben, als das aufzugeben. Das Buch ist vor sechs Jahren erschienen. Seitdem vergeht kaum ein Tag, an dem mein Leben nicht in irgendeiner Weise zu diesem Buch in Beziehung gesetzt wird.

Wie meinen Sie das?

Neulich, nach einem Konzert in Düsseldorf, stand mir ein Mann gegenüber, dessen Vater der Anwalt meiner Urgroßmutter war. Er ist im Buch erwähnt, aber ich kannte ihn nicht. Das stärkt natürlich meine deutschen Wurzeln sehr.

Haben Sie durch die Arbeit an dem Buch Heimat dazu gewonnen?

Eine seelische Heimat, genau. Ich kann die schmerzhaften Erfahrungen, die meine Familie gemacht hat, spüren. Seit 1930 sind in unserer Familie alle Exilanten. Ich verstehe jetzt, was das heißt. Und habe Frieden damit geschlossen. Ich freue mich, in Deutschland zu sein, in Deutschland zu spielen, in Deutschland Musik zu machen. Meine Urgroßeltern waren ja auch ungeheuer patriotisch.

Das macht die Geschichte besonders tragisch.

Beide Urgroßväter haben im Ersten Weltkrieg für Deutschland gekämpft, beide waren hochdekoriert und liebten die deutsche Musik, die Literatur. Sie haben sich mit dem Judentum gar nicht identifizieren können. Ihre Familien sind Mitte des 19.Jahrhunderts konvertiert. Allerdings geht unser Stammbaum zurück bis zum ersten Rabbiner von Potsdam. Dazu kommen irisch- römisch-katholische Vorfahren. Sie sehen, ich kann mich nur als Europäer fühlen.

Wenn man so viel unterwegs ist wie Sie, hat man nicht das Bedürfnis nach einem Platz, der so etwas wie eine Heimat ist?

Das ist im Prinzip Wien. Die Musikstadt. Ich liebe es, an den Häusern vorbeizugehen, in denen Mozart oder Dvořák oder sogar Vivaldi gelebt haben. Ständig an die Musik erinnert zu werden, die ich täglich spiele. Obwohl – seit wir ein Kind haben, seit acht Monaten also, ist meine Heimat bei ihm. Wir sind sehr viel zusammen gereist. Und er hat das sehr gut weggesteckt. Das wird nicht immer so bleiben.

Die Österreicher können auch ganz schön abweisend sein, oder erleben Sie das nicht?

Oh ja. Die Wiener sind speziell. Aber ich bin genauso direkt wie sie. Man darf sich nicht einschüchtern lassen.

Darf man in London auch nicht, oder?

Absolut nicht. Aber dort beruht die Distanz auf Zurückhaltung, nicht auf Konfrontation. In der U-Bahn in London sagt niemand etwas. Doch wenn man den Menschen näherkommt, stößt man auf eine sehr freundliche Welt. Die Engländer gehören zu den höflichsten Menschen überhaupt.

Glauben Sie eigentlich, dass man das Exilantentum in der DNA hat? Und dass Sie sich deshalb leicht anpassen können?

Ich glaube, dass der Krieg die Nachkommen derer, die geflohen sind, genauso nachhaltig geprägt hat und immer noch prägt wie die Nachkommen derer, die umgekommen sind oder die sich schuldig gemacht haben. Meine Mutter ist in Südafrika aufgewachsen, mit Englisch als Muttersprache. Deutsch wurde nie mehr gesprochen in der Familie. Über Deutschland wurde auch nicht mehr gesprochen. Dieser Teil der Vergangenheit existierte nicht.

In letzter Zeit haben Sie viele Konzerte mit Musik aus Theresienstadt gegeben.

Ich bin, zusammen mit den Sängern Anne Sofie von Otter und Christian Gerhaher, auch nach Theresienstadt gefahren, wir haben Zeitzeugen getroffen und einen Film dort gedreht. Wenn man sich nur vorstellt, was aus der Musik geworden wäre, wenn diese vielen jüdischen Musiker damals überlebt hätten… Es fehlt einfach eine ganze Musikrichtung im 20. Jahrhundert.

Sie selbst leben ja, weil Ihre Vorfahren geflohen sind und überlebt haben.

Genau. Nach den vielen Jahren, in denen ich die Musik der Menschen gespielt habe, denen die Flucht nicht geglückt ist, wollte ich mich mit der Kehrseite beschäftigen. Also fing ich an zu lesen, ich habe Klaus Manns Exilliteratur gelesen, besonders wichtig war natürlich „Escape to Life“. Ich habe Thomas Mann gelesen, Hanns Eisler, und ich flog nach Los Angeles, um mich mit der Schönberg-Familie zu treffen, die immer noch in Arnold Schönbergs Haus lebt. Ich habe sie besucht, es wurde Wiener Schnitzel serviert, Sachertorte und Kaffee mit Schlag. Da stand immer noch der Stuhl von Arnold Schönberg, auf dem er saß, wenn er unterrichtete. Ich hatte das Gefühl, im Los Angeles von 1940 zu sitzen. Und wieder spürte ich, was es heißt, sich im Exil zu befinden.

Wie lang recherchieren Sie für ein solches Album?

Zwei, drei Jahre. Es war eine sehr intensive Zeit. Ich habe mich durch die Archive der Paramount Studios gewühlt. Und mit Leuten aus der Zeit gesprochen, mit 95-Jährigen, die erzählt haben, was Los Angeles bedeutet hat damals.

Wer war dabei?

Walter Arlen. Er ist 94, Komponist, floh 1939 aus Wien nach Los Angeles und wurde dann Kritiker der Los Angeles Times. Er war in jedem Konzert, er kannte all die Komponisten, die auf dieser Platte sind, persönlich. Der Pianist Menahem Pressler wiederum kannte noch Franz Waxman, der 1934 aus Deutschland geflohen war und in Hollywood Filmmusiken komponierte. Ohne diese persönlichen Informationen hätte ich mich nicht getraut, die Musik aus der Zeit nachzuspielen. Ich habe mir eine Zeitmaschine verschafft, damit ich die Musik besser verstehe.

Was ist an der Musik schwer zu verstehen?

Es gibt so viele Vorurteile der Filmmusik gegenüber. Man hält sie für banal. Aber das könnte nicht weiter entfernt von der Wahrheit sein. Ich habe ja nicht „Fluch der Karibik“ oder „Transformers“ aufgenommen. Sondern wirklich die Musik aus jener Zeit. Und die Komponisten mussten diese Musik schreiben, um zu überleben. Dabei waren gerade sie damals musikalisch auf einem ganz anderen Weg.

Auf welchem Weg?

Weg von der großen Symphonie. Denken Sie nur an Schönberg. Oder Korngold. Sie empfanden sich als Vertreter der musikalischen Moderne. Aber die Studiobosse wollten die große Symphonie von ihnen, und so wurden sie festgehalten in ihrer Entwicklung. Der Tonfilm war neu. Man brauchte einen Soundtrack. Der Hollywoodklang der Dreißiger- und Vierzigerjahre kam im Grunde aus Europa, das finde ich so spannend. Korngold hat komponiert, um Geld zu verdienen, mit dem er seine Verwandten aus Europa nachholen konnte.

Waren die meisten der Filmkomponisten jüdische Emigranten aus Europa?

Nicht nur die. Die Instrumentalisten auch. Das vervollständigte natürlich den europäischen Klang. Die Studioorchester damals in Hollywood waren mit den besten Musikern besetzt, viele von ihnen europäische Juden. Wenn man ein Violinsolo von 1935, 36, 38 hört, ist das oft Toscha Seidel. Oder Louis Kaufman. Kaufman allerdings wurde in Amerika als Sohn rumänischer Juden geboren. Ein schlauer Hund. Er hat die „Vier Jahreszeiten“ wiederentdeckt und populär gemacht. Vivaldi war vollkommen in Vergessenheit geraten. Louis Kaufman spielte die „Vier Jahreszeiten“ mit dem Klavier ein und machte daraus einen Riesen-Schallplattenhit. Da ging das Vivaldi-Fieber los, in Hollywood.

Aber das ist eine andere Geschichte. Einer der bekannteren Komponisten auf Ihrem Album ist Erich Wolfgang Korngold, geboren in Wien. Er galt schon mit elf Jahren als Wunderkind.

Und er ist für mich die Schlüsselfigur hier. Ohne ihn sind viele Filmkomponisten gar nicht denkbar. Und sein Violinkonzert ist eine alte, große Liebe von mir, weil Jascha Heifetz das so unglaublich gespielt hat, für mich der größte Geiger. Auch er hat Hollywood ja sehr geprägt.

Perfektes Zusammenspiel, wie bei Glenn Gould und den Goldberg-Variationen?

So ähnlich, ja. Ich habe das Stück schon gespielt, weil ich es so liebte, aber nur für mich, privat. 25 Jahre lang. Jetzt bin ich älter geworden und etwas mutiger. Da dachte ich, ich fange mal an, es auf Konzerten zu spielen. Und habe gemerkt, wie genial dieses Stück ist. Wie es spiegelt, was in Korngolds Leben los war: die Zerrissenheit. Ihm war immer klar, dass er Musik für Filme genauso lang komponieren würde, wie Hitler an der Macht sein würde. Dann würde er anknüpfen an die Musik, die er vorher komponiert hatte. Das Violinkonzert sollte sein Comeback werden.

Sie spielen auf dem Album auch eine Filmmusik von Ennio Morricone, die Musik von „Schindlers Liste“ und die von „American Beauty“. Wie passt das zu Ihrem Konzept?

Mich hat interessiert, wie groß der Einfluss der emigrierten Musiker auf den Hollywood-Sound war. Da kam ich auf Alfred Newman, amerikanischer Jude aus Brooklyn, der als der Pate der Hollywoodmusik gilt. Er komponierte die Musik für „Der Glöckner von Notre Dame“ und „Sturmhöhen“. Von ihm war es nicht weit zu seinem Sohn, Thomas Newman, der die Musik für „American Beauty“ komponiert hat, für mich eine der besten Filmmusiken überhaupt. So ging ich weiter, zu Ennio Morricone. Er war auch nach Amerika gegangen, zwar nicht im Krieg, sondern später. Aber er kam als unbekannter Orchestermusiker aus allerärmsten Verhältnissen. Und hat den Hollywoodklang ganz neu definiert.

Haben Sie ihn auch kennengelernt?

Ja, aber in einem anderen Zusammenhang. Das war hier, im Palace Hotel, ganz zufällig. Ist schon ein paar Jahre her. Hier steigen ja traditionell viele Musiker ab. Ich kam todmüde hier an, sah nur, dass nebenan der Raum voll mit Champagner trinkenden Menschen war. Das Letzte, was ich wollte, war Champagner trinken. Da stand auch schon Mstislaw Rostropowitsch vor mir, der russische Cellist, und sagte: „Mein Freund, komm rüber.“ Da gab es kein Entrinnen.

Sie haben doch Champagner getrunken.

Klar! Und er hat mich seinem Freund Ennio Morricone vorgestellt. Ich dachte, mein Gott, so was kann nur hier im Palace Hotel in München passieren. Dann hielt Rostropowitsch eine Rede, wie nur er sie halten kann, mit tausendmal zuprosten und anstoßen. Und sagte, mein großer Freund Morricone, ich freue mich jetzt schon darauf, dass du mir ein Cello-Konzert schreibst. Alle applaudierten. Es war klar, dass es nur eine Frage der Zeit sein würde, bis er das bekam. Denn er hat immer alles bekommen, was er wollte. Daniel Hope wurde am 17. August 1973 in Durban, Südafrika, geboren. Bald schon zog seine Familie nach Paris, dann nach London. Dort arbeitete seine Mutter bei Yehudi Menuhin. Der vierjährige Sohn begann, Violine zu spielen, und wurde später von Yehudi Menuhin unterrichtet. Mit elf führte Hope zusammen mit Menuhin Bartók-Duos für das Deutsche Fernsehen auf. Heute arbeitet er mit den großen internationalen Orchestern und Dirigenten, dirigiert viele Ensembles von der Geige aus und ist berühmt für seine Vielseitigkeit. So verbindet er oft Text und Musik, wie bei den Konzerten mit Musik aus Theresienstadt. In seinem Buch „Familienstücke“ (2007) ergründete er die Geschichte seiner Urgroßeltern in Berlin. Am 29. August erscheint sein neues Album: „Escape to Paradise – The Hollywood Album“.

Musik hat überlebt
Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung, 30.08.2014



  all print interviews