Articles

2016


My mentor Yehudi Menuhin: ‘I can still hear his beautiful sound’
The Guardian, 29.03.2016

For the centenary of the great violinist’s birth, Daniel Hope, his protege from the age of two, remembers their life on the road – including the time his priceless violin, nicknamed Lord Wilton, went missing.

 

Yehudi Menuhin used to say that I fell into his lap as a baby. Life in 1970s South Africa had become intolerable for my parents, thanks to the apartheid regime. We lived in Durban, where my father co-founded the literary magazine Bolt, publishing poems by writers of many races. From that moment on, his phone was tapped and they were under permanent surveillance. They had no option but to leave the country. My father was only offered an exit permit. This meant you could leave but never return.

They settled in London, where very soon their money ran out. We had nowhere to go. My father, Christopher Hope, was a struggling author. He went on to win the Whitbread Prize, but back then anti-South African sentiment in the UK made it very hard for him to find work, even though he was fiercely anti-apartheid. My mother supported us with part-time secretarial jobs. At the 11th hour, facing calamity, we had some incredible luck. An employment agency offered her a compelling choice of jobs: secretary to either the Archbishop of Canterbury or the violinist Yehudi Menuhin. She had no musical training, but she loved music and admired Menuhin, whom she had heard perform in South Africa.

Coincidentally, my parents had also heard the then-Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Coggan, preach in South Africa and had been shocked that he did not actively denounce apartheid – so she would never have taken the job with him. The interview with Menuhin lasted two minutes. He asked if she knew the difference between Beethoven and Bach. When she said yes, he asked: “When can you start?” My mother’s association with Menuhin lasted 24 years, right up until his death in 1999.

Our lives changed immediately and for ever. I was two and, for the next eight years, practically grew up in Menuhin’s house in Highgate, London, where my mother would take me to play while she worked. Although we had only just settled in London, Menuhin asked her to come to his summer festival in Gstaad for two months. Her concerns at leaving her family were swept aside. “I would never separate a mother from her family,” Menuhin said. “Bring everyone with you.” And that’s what she did.

I was a kid who could never sit still, so my mother was very surprised to see me silent on the hard pew of the church where rehearsals took place, intent on the music. I was surrounded by artists of all kinds, so in a way it was no surprise when I announced to my parents at the age of four that I wanted to become a Violinist.

The violin was a part of Menuhin. To this day, his sound remains in my ear, so unique and so fascinatingly beautiful. He’d leave his Guarneri del Gesù, a priceless violin made in 1742 and known as the “Lord Wilton”, in an open case on the table; he never put it away. He picked it up and played it almost as if he were drinking a glass of water. He once told me: “One has to play every day. One is like a bird, and can you imagine a bird saying, ‘I’m tired today – I don’t feel like flying’?”

How do I begin to summarise a career that spanned 75 years and made him one of the greatest musicians in history? Perhaps with his debut in 1924 in San Francisco at the age of seven, or maybe his performance in Berlin in 1929, which prompted Albert Einstein to exclaim: “Now I know there is a God in heaven!” Or his legendary recording of the Elgar concerto under the composer’s own baton in 1932. Then there’s his visit to the liberated concentration camp of Bergen-Belsen with Benjamin Britten in 1945; and his highly controversial decision to return to Germany in 1947, where he performed with Wilhelm Furtwängler and the Berlin Philharmonic, the first Jewish artist after the war to do so.

Only seven of Menuhin’s 82 years were not spent on the road. He adored playing and travelling. His wife almost always accompanied him, his children less so. Musically, I learned from him constantly, just happy to have the chance of observing him close up. But it was also testing – an education in the fierce, peripatetic life of the soloist and the kaleidoscopic world of hotels, stages, airports and orchestras they inhabit. The cities to which I was introduced delighted and alarmed in equal measure. Menuhin had been on the road since he was still in shorts, though, and was an expert.

Along with a gentleness that masked an iron will, Menuhin’s humour was inexhaustible. On one occasion, my father was entrusted with taking his Guarneri del Gesù on an Alitalia flight to Rome. Menuhin was at the front of the plane and went straight to the VIP room. When we got to passport control at Fiumicino airport, I asked my father where the violin was. My father looked at me with shock and came out with an expletive. He had left the violin in the baggage compartment on the plane. He ran like an Olympic sprinter back on to the runway and up the stairs of the aircraft – you could do that in those days. When Menuhin heard about the incident, he giggled like a little boy. Thanks to some kind carabinieri, he got his violin back after a tense half-hour – tense for my father, anyway.

I had a few lessons from him as a very young boy, but our real collaboration began when I was 16. By that stage, I had had my own teachers, in particular the great Russian pedagogue Zakhar Bron. Menuhin was curious to see what Bron had been able to achieve with the “boy next door”. His reaction was a mixture of shock and delight, and he suggested we perform together. Over the next 10 years, we played more than 60 concerts around the world: I played, he conducted. The works included Mendelssohn’s early D minor Concerto, which Menuhin famously discovered in 1951, and also many works for two violins, such as the A minor Double Concerto by Vivaldi.

On 7 March 1999, I played Alfred Schnittke’s Concerto in Düsseldorf, conducted by Menuhin. It was to be his final concert. After the Schnittke, Menuhin encouraged me to play an encore. I spontaneously chose Kaddish, Ravel’s musical version of the Jewish prayer for the dead. I had grown up on Menuhin’s interpretation of this work and wanted to dedicate it to him. Menuhin pushed me out on to the stage and sat among the orchestra listening to it. Five days later, he passed away.

Daniel Hope’s album My Tribute to Yehudi Menuhin is out now on Deutsche Grammophon. The Menuhin Competition takes place at venues across London from 7 to 17 April.

 

How European exile composers created the sounds of Hollywood
Deutsche Welle, 16.03.2016

World-renowned violinist Daniel Hope uncovered dusty letters and compositions scribbled on scraps of paper for “The Sounds of Hollywood,” a book and a CD on Jewish immigrant composers who fled to Hollywood in the 1930s.

 

Born in South Africa in 1973, Daniel Hope was raised in England. Yet the violinist has long been curious about his Jewish family, which traces its roots back to Berlin. Fifteen years ago, Hope began to dig more deeply into the biographies of Jewish musicians, especially composers of German and Austrian heritage who migrated to Hollywood. The list was long: Friedrich Hollaender, Erich Korngold, Franz Wachsmann, Max Steiner, Werner Richard Heymann.

His original aim was to uncover music pieces for a new CD recording but it quickly became clear that he’d hit upon an entirely new project. Much as a cultural archaeologist might do, Hope delved into the biographies, archives and personal estates of the artists. Curious, he followed the trail of the immigrants through Hollywood, interviewing their children, grandchildren and surviving relatives. Extensive archives at Paramount Studios in Hollywood turned up an unbelievable treasury filled with hand-written correspondence, scored notes, letters.

“I have read a lot about this period. But it’s quite different to go into these archives and open old, dusty boxes,” Hope said of his time spent with the composers’ history. “Suddenly, you’re sitting there with Erich Korngold’s notes scribbled on a napkin, composing a Viennese Waltz, crossing it out and then recomposing it. You get the feeling at that moment that you’ve really stepped back in time.”

In researching his latest book, “Sounds of Hollywood” (available in German only for now) and the CD of the same name, Hope took an important trip back in time. With the knowledge of each composer’s unique destiny in mind, Hope could make the emotional connection to the music, he told DW in an interview. “There’s quite a bit of melancholy in the music of these emigrants, and a lot of nostalgia.”

 

The talkie boom

There was a substantial need for film composers in Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s, as the film industry was booming thanks to the advent of the talkie. Some film productions could be likened to an assembly line and studio heads traveled frequently to Europe to acquire the talents – the best of the best.

“They put out their antenna and found Kurt Weill, Hanns Eisler and all of the other great composers who already had an audience and had seen success in Europe,” said Hope.

“These emigrants brought with them the musical offerings by composers like Gustav Mahler and Richard Wagner. They delivered exactly what the studio bosses in Hollywood wanted them to bring: the great, the epic, the symphonic,” he said. The opulent orchestral sounds that we still hear in big Hollywood films today can be traced back to this time.

In his research, Daniel Hope has found parallels to the refugee crisis currently happening in Europe. “It’s not as if Hollywood was standing there with open arms, waiting to receive the migrants and refugees from Europe,” Hope said, alluding to the intense competition within the film industry. “Many of these very talented composers weren’t even named in the credits. They sat together as a group of eight or nine working on a film and delivered every so often a phrase.”

Only the rare immigrant had already made a name for himself that he could use to gain work in the booming film industry. Arnold Schönberg and Igor Stravinsky got generous offers from the West Coast. “But they both turned down the chance to work in the film industry or were themselves turned down because they had completely different ideas about music than the American film producers had,” according to Hope.

 

Hollywood’s information exchange

Schönberg, who developed dodecaphonic music, found the world of film soundtracks fascinating, highly appealing. But he had trouble with the American studio philosophy, which degraded composers as it positioned them as mere service providers, Hope uncovered. “Schönberg wasn’t ready to give up complete creative control, control over his music was used in the direction. As a result, he realized very quickly that it wasn’t something for him.”

The exchange between those who created culture and the European immigrants was lively. Meetings over a Wiener schnitzel or a round of Berlin-style meatballs wasn’t unheard of as the men tried to carry on the coffeehouse traditions of Vienna and Berlin in Hollywood. And in doing so, lots of information was exchanged, from mere gossip to important news about the immigration authorities and current job offers.

The infamous Villa Aurora, where novelist Lion Feuchtwanger and his wife Martha lived, became something of a meeting point, a reception center for those newly emigrated. “He considered himself as something like a godfather to these ‘artists in exile’,” said Hope. In addition to the immigrants, a number of famous actors and personalities, including Charlie Chaplin, came to the villa to meet.

 

A struggle to survive

The majority of the European immigrants who arrived in Hollywood never came into contact with the glamorous side of the film industry. Many struggled to even scrape by, and worried about a lack of money to even cover their basic needs like clothing, rent and food. Most of them had to leave Nazi Germany virtually overnight after Hitler came to power in 1933, leaving everything behind. Daniel Hope stumbled upon moving stories that took place behind Hollywood’s glitzy façade.

Success as a film composer in the US had other downsides as well and could completely destroy an ambitious composer with dreams of recognition. Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who was much celebrated in Europe as a musical wunderkind, never felt accepted or at home in the USA – despite his greatest successes. Korngold won two Oscars for his film soundtracks.

“He was no longer recognized as a serious composer in the classical world and was no longer accepted there,” says Hope. Korngold was accused of having sold his soul. Thomas Mann, himself an immigrant, spoke of so-called “Movie riff-raff.” Film music was considered second- or third-class.

“That’s a bitter pill to swallow,” says Daniel Hope. “These were men who had enormous talent and unbelievable composition skills, who had to struggle to find a way during an emergency situation. Yet they were persecuted for their work in film. That’s a real tragedy.”

Author Heike Mund



2015


Der Geiger Daniel Hope legt die europäischen Wurzeln des “Sound of Hollywood” bloß
Dresdner Neueste Nachrichten, 02.11.2015

Hölle oder Paradies
Der Geiger Daniel Hope legt die europäischen Wurzeln des “Sound of Hollywood” bloß
Von Frauke Kaberka

Was wären “Vom Winde verweht”, “Der weiße Hai” oder “Titanic” ohne ihren Sound? Filmmusik hat sich längst einen besonderen Status als eigenständige Kunstform erarbeitet. Insbesondere Melodien aus Hollywoodproduktionen werden gern in Konzerten gespielt und sind fester Bestandteil von Rundfunkunterhaltungsprogrammen. Nicht jedem aber ist bekannt, dass ihre Wurzeln in Europa liegen. Konkret waren es vor allem jüdische Künstler, die in den ersten Jahrzehnten des 20. Jahrhunderts nach Amerika zogen, um sich in der kalifornischen Traumfabrik eine neue Existenz aufzubauen. Daniel Hope, ein Weltstar unter den Geigern, hat sich auf Spurensuche begeben und mit dem Journalisten Wolfgang Knauer darüber ein informatives Buch verfasst, das eine hochaktuelle Botschaft hat. “Sounds of Hollywood” ist mehr als ein Blick auf die Filmmusikgeschichte aus Hollywood.

Es war im November 2013, als der 1974 in Südafrika geborene Musiker bei einem Sonderkonzert in Berlin auftrat –  zum Gedenken an Künstler, deren Karrieren und Leben vor 75 Jahren nicht nur bedroht, sondern oft auch zerstört  wurden. Mit der Reichspogromnacht begann in Deutschland und dann auch in weiten Teilen Europas die “Entjudung”. Das Konzert am Brandenburger Tor unter dem Motto “Tausend Stimmen für die Vielfalt” wurde untermalt mit großen Bildprojektionen von eben jenen Künstlern, die über Nacht ihre Heimat verlassen mussten. Hope hatte sich bereits vorher mit diesen Menschen und ihrem Schicksal befasst, denn es ist auch das Schicksal seiner Familie. Nun wollte er mehr wissen, ihren Weg nachvollziehen, den sie in der Fremde gingen. Und viele dieser Weg führten über den Atlantik nach Hollywood.

Die aufblühende Filmwirtschaft verhieß nicht nur emigrierten Musikern Sicherheit und Arbeit. Wissenschaftler, Schriftsteller und Dichter, Regisseure und Schauspieler strandeten ebenfalls zuhauf an den südkalifornischen Gestaden, darunter Bertolt Brecht, Lion Feuchtwanger, Franz Werfel, Max Reinhardt, Billy Wilder und viele andere. Doch weder für sie noch für viele Exil-Musiker war es ein leichter Neubeginn. Manche schafften es nie, denn Hollywood wurde mit Emigranten überschwemmt, und Arbeit gab es nicht genug. Zudem fanden einige überhaupt keinen Bezug zum Exil und zum Medium Film, wie Reinhardt, Brecht oder der Komponist Arnold Schönberg. Für Bert Brecht war Hollywood die “Hölle”, für Schönberg hingegen die “Vertreibung ins Paradies”. Einige der Komponisten, deren Spuren Hope folgte, konnten sich trotz großer Erfolge nie mit Hollywood anfreunden, so Erich Wolfgang Korngold, der lieber nur “ernsthafte” Musik geschrieben hätte. Andere wie Max Steiner, der “Vater der Filmmusik”, und auch der jüngere André Previn hingegen hatten ihr Metier gefunden.

Hope, der sich nicht nur durch die Literatur über die berühmten Musiker arbeitete, sondern auch mit ihnen (Previn), Angehörigen (Schönberg) oder Freunden und Kollegen sprach, trug so für sein Buch auch Anekdoten, Bonmots und zudem ein wenig Klatsch zusammen, was den Unterhaltungswert der flott und locker geschriebenen Lektüre sicherlich steigert.

Dass der Geiger den ernsten Hintergrund seiner Recherche dabei nicht aus den Augen lässt, macht das Buch angesichts eines wieder zunehmenden Antisemitismus und einer nicht zu ignorierenden aufkeimenden Fremdenfeindlichkeit besonders wichtig. “Als Angehöriger einer Familie, die in der Nazi-Zeit das Schicksal der Vertreibung erlitten hat, empfinde ich solche Anzeichen als alarmierend”, schreibt Hope. “Umso entschiedener engagiere ich mich für den Ruf nach Toleranz, der bei jenem Konzert am Brandenburger Tor zu vernehmen war, als die Musik derer gespielt wurde, die Opfer der Intoleranz wurden.” Doch er sehe in den Erfolgen jener Menschen im fernen Amerika, die Bahnbrechendes zuwege gebracht hätten, auch einen Funken Hoffnung, “der Mut auf eine bessere Zukunft macht”.
Daniel Hope und Wolfgang Knauer: Sounds of Hollywood. Wie Emigranten aus Europa die amerikanische Filmmusik erfanden, Rowohlt Verlag, 336 Seiten, 19,95 Euro

Überleben in Hollywood
Südwest Presse, 22.08.2015

“Robin Hood hat mir das Leben gerettet”, hat Erich Wolfgang Korngold einmal gesagt.

Der Komponist war für seinen schwarzen Humor berüchtigt, aber dies war kein lockerer Spruch: Nur sechs Wochen vor dem Einmarsch deutscher Truppen in Österreich 1938 folgte Korngold dem Ruf aus Kalifornien, den Soundtrack für den Errol-Flynn-Streifen “König der Vagabunden” zu schreiben. Korngold, der schon zuvor in Hollywood einige Filme vertont hatte, gewann dafür seinen zweiten Oscar – und blieb in den USA, was eben wohl sein Leben rettete.

Denn Korngold war Jude, und seine Geschichte ist eine von vielen, die Star-Geiger Daniel Hope (mit dem Journalisten Wolfgang Knauer) in dem Buch “Sounds of Hollywood” erzählt. “Wie europäische Emigranten die amerikanische Filmmusik erfanden”, lautet der Untertitel. 2014 hat Hope die CD “Escape to Paradise”, eine etwas heterogene, zuweilen sentimental klingende Reise in die Filmmusikwelt vorgelegt – das Buch hängt mit dem Album eng zusammen.

Hope erinnert an eine finstere Epoche: Wie von 1933 an eine kulturelle Blütezeit brutal beendet wurde, wie die Nazis auch im Kulturbetrieb Juden verfolgten. “Morgen muss ich fort von hier”, hieß die letzte Platte der Comedian Harmonists, die eben noch gefeiert wurden, nun Auftrittsverbot hatten.

Fort von hier: Für die Regisseure, Autoren, Musiker und andere Filmschaffende, denen es noch gelang, Deutschland zu verlassen, war Hollywood ein ersehntes Ziel, ein Versprechen. Für Komponisten war die fremde Sprache ein weniger gravierendes Problem wie für andere. Tatsächlich ist die Reihe derer, die – wie Hope belegt – “dank brillanter Einfälle, großem handwerklichen Können und professioneller Erfahrung” ihren Weg machten und auf Hollywood klingenden Einfluss nahmen, bemerkenswert lang. Hope erzählt von Korngold, der vom Wiener Wunderkind zum Hollywood-Meister wurde und dort doch nie ganz glücklich; von Max Steiner, dem “Vater der Filmmusik”; von Friedrich Holländer und Werner Richard Heymann, von Franz Wachsmann und Kurt Weill, der freilich erst am Broadway sein Glück fand.

Für viele ging der Traum einer neuen Karriere allerdings nicht in Erfüllung. Hope vergisst sie nicht, er erzählt von Hanns Eislers Scheitern, von Komponisten wie Erich Zeisl, die nur noch Fußnoten in der Musikgeschichte sind. In Hopes Buch erwacht dabei die Hollywood-Gesellschaft der Exilanten wieder zu Leben, man begegnet Arnold Schönberg und Alma Werfel-Mahler, Thomas Mann, Bertolt Brecht und Bruno Walter.

Recherchen und Reportagen, Gespräche und Anekdoten, Ausflüge auf Friedhöfe und in Archive: Hope schreibt mit Empathie, die Wurzeln des englisch-südafrikanischen Musikers (über die er in “Familienstücke” berichtet hat) liegen in Berlin, auch seine Familiengeschichte ist eine Emigrantengeschichte.

Und er ist ein Musik-Botschafter. Mit seinem Buch will er zeigen, wie viel einst verloren ging, als Künstler vertrieben wurden, weil sie Juden waren. Tröstlich bleibt nur, schreibt er, dass einigen ein neuer Anfang gelang und sie in der Fremde Anerkennung fanden – nicht zuletzt in Hollywood, dessen Klang sie prägten.

‘Träume in Musik’ – BUCH-TIPP
OSTTHÜRINGER ZEITUNG, 10.08.2015

Annerose Kirchner über “Sounds of Hollywood” , verfasst von Stargeiger Daniel Hope

“Die Filmfabrik von Hollywood war der große Traum für viele der zwischen 1933 und 1944 aus Nazideutschland und Österreich geflohenen Künstler. Doch nicht für jeden öffnete sich die Tür zu den Studios. Wer Vielseitigkeit bot wie der Komponist Friedrich Hollaender, der auch als Textdichter, Kabarettist, Revue-Produzent und Musiker seine Kreativität unter Beweis stellte, hatte es leichter.
Sein Schicksal ist nur eines von vielen, das der aus Durban/Südafrika stammende Stargeiger Daniel Hope in seinem Buch “Sounds of Hollywood. Wie Emigranten aus Europa die amerikanische Filmmusik erfanden” (Rowohlt Verlag) aufgreift. Er reiste nach Hollywood, besuchte Schauplätze und traf Zeitzeugen, wie den in Los Angeles geborenen Sohn des Komponisten Arnold Schönberg. Dessen Vater konnte sich nicht für das Filmgeschäft begeistern, vermittelte aber als Lehrer wichtige Impulse.
Komponisten wie Max Steiner ( King Kong ), Erich Wolfgang Korngold ( Captain Blood ) oder Miklós Rózsa ( Ben Hur ) begeisterten das Publikum mit opulenten Orchesterklängen und fulminanten Sounds. Das war neu in den USA und beeinflusste die Musikwelt bis heute. Daniel Hope erinnert auch an das Netzwerk der Exilanten um die Schriftsteller Thomas Mann und Lion Feuchtwanger. Seine Recherchen verbindet er mit der eigenen Familiengeschichte und den jüdischen Vorfahren, die in Berlin lebten.
Hope zeigt auf, was verloren ging in schrecklichen Zeiten und welche Kulturvielfalt in der Emigration neu entstehen konnte. Vor allem wirbt er für Toleranz und Mitmenschlichkeit.”

Der coole Schritt ins 21. Jahrhundert
Limmattaler Zeitung, 29.04.2015

Stargeiger Daniel Hope wird Musikdirektor beim Zürcher Kammerorchester.

Endlich, nach dem offiziellen Teil der gestrigen Programmpräsentation liess Direktor Michael Bühler die Bombe platzen: Daniel Hope ist der neue Music Director des traditionsreichen Zürcher Kammerorchesters. Wussten wir das nicht schon, fragen Sie sich jetzt. Gewiss: In dieser Zeitung stand am 29. Januar: «Wird bald ein Geiger das Zürcher Kammerorchester leiten? Vielleicht gar Daniel Hope?» Und der «Tages-Anzeiger» plapperte die Neuigkeit einige Wochen später nach. Jetzt ist es offiziell: Der britische Stargeiger tritt übernächste Saison sein Amt an. Ein Glücksfall für ein um Profil kämpfendes Kammerorchester: Hope ist nicht einfach einer, der ab und zu vorne auf dem Podium stehen und halbdirigierend Violinkonzerte fiedeln wird, sondern er steht für eine Zukunft der Klassik: Neue Projekte, neue Orte, andere Formen, der Miteinbezug von Sprache – alles Dinge, die Hope längst weltweit ausprobiert hat. Und bestens verkauft.

Hope wird allerdings explizit nicht Chefdirigent des ZKO. Als Music Director wird er andere Dirigenten und dirigierende Solisten einladen. Wer deshalb befürchtet, dass dem ZKO nun der vom ehemaligen, 81-jährigen Chefdirigenten Roger Norrington entwickelte Charakter verloren geht, hat vielleicht nicht unrecht. Aber eben: mit einem fixen Dirigenten ist man auch wieder nur ein kleines Tonhalle-Orchester. Mit Hope wird man ein noch flexibleres, noch moderneres Ensemble. Mit Hope hat man zudem einen Kopf, der international Gold wert ist. Schon in der Saison 2015/2016 wird man die Abo-Konzerte um einen Drittel kürzen (neu 10), und vermehrt im Ausland auftreten.

Fazil Say ist dann Artiste in Residence – und Norrington dirigiert zum Glück weiterhin einige Abende. Die Auslastung ist gestiegen, die Eigenwirtschaftlichkeit ebenso. Auch die CD-Produktion läuft, eben ist eine frische Aufnahme von Haydn-Sinfonien erschienen. Kurz: Es sieht gut aus für das ZKO.

von Christian Berzins

Der Ausstrahlungsaktivist
Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 29.04.2015

Daniel Hope wird «Music Director» des Zürcher Kammerorchesters

Der Geiger Daniel Hope wird Nachfolger von Sir Roger Norrington beim Zürcher Kammerorchester. Hope soll die internationale Ausstrahlung des Orchesters erhöhen – zulasten der Präsenz in der Tonhalle.

Michael Bühler, der Direktor des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO), machte es spannend. Wie in einer Fernsehshow liess er die Saisonpressekonferenz seines Orchesters im Hotel «Eden au Lac» zielgerichtet auf den Höhepunkt zulaufen. Zunächst gab es ein Puzzle-Bild zum Raten, dann öffneten sich die Türen, und zum Einzug des Helden, der punktgenau leibhaftig im Saal erschien, hätte bloss noch eine tönende Untermalung im Stil von «We Are the Champions» gefehlt. Ganz schön viel Pomp für eine Personalie, die einige Zürcher Spatzen schon seit längerem von den Dächern pfiffen: Der Geiger Daniel Hope wird neuer «Music Director» des ZKO.

Hope wird seine neue Funktion, die man früher schlicht «Chefdirigent» oder «Künstlerischer Leiter» genannt hätte und in der offenbar genau diese zwei Aufgaben zusammenfliessen sollen, zur Saison 2016/17 antreten. Er schliesst damit die Lücke, die der Rücktritt von Sir Roger Norrington hinterlässt: Norrington will sein Amt als «Principal Guest Conductor» des ZKO zum Ende der laufenden Saison aus Altersgründen abgeben; er wird dem Orchester aber durch Gastauftritte eng verbunden bleiben. Daniel Hope soll dafür bereits jetzt aktiv in die künstlerischen Planungen einsteigen. In der Interimssaison bis zu seinem offiziellen Antritt wird Konzertmeister Willi Zimmermann verstärkt Leitungsaufgaben im Orchester übernehmen.

Für Daniel Hope schliesst sich, wie er nicht ohne Rührung erzählte, mit seiner Berufung ein Kreis in seinem Künstlerleben. Noch in der Ära des Orchestergründers Edmond de Stoutz habe er mit dem ZKO einige wichtige frühe Konzerterfahrungen sammeln dürfen: «Das erste Mozart-Konzert, den ersten Bach – das vergisst man nie», schwärmte Hope. Für die Zukunft hat er sich vorgenommen, zusammen mit dem Geigenkollegen Zimmermann und den weiteren Stimmführern eine «gemeinsame Vision» für das Orchester zu entwickeln. Wie diese konkret aussehen könnte, verriet Hope noch nicht.

Aus der Personalie Hope und einigen Bemerkungen Bühlers kann man aber erraten, wohin die Reise gehen soll. Man zielt offenkundig auf noch mehr überregionale und internationale Ausstrahlung – Hope, der seine vielfältigen Aktivitäten auf seiner persönlichen Website unter Rubriken wie «The Violinist», «The Broadcaster», «The Musical Activist», «The Producer» und «The Author» auflistet, dürfte nicht zuletzt die mediale Präsenz des Orchesters beträchtlich erhöhen.

Schon in der kommenden Saison 2015/16 will man beim ZKO einige Konsequenzen aus Erfahrungen der vergangenen Spielzeiten ziehen. Während die Besucherzahlen bei den Konzerten in der Tonhalle 2013/14 nur geringfügig auf rund 25 000 gestiegen seien, so Bühler, habe man die Gesamtzahl durch Tourneen und Gastspiele auf über 55 700 Konzertbesucher steigern und somit mehr als verdoppeln können.

Dieser Erfolgskurs soll nun durch eine Ausweitung der Aktivitäten in Stadt und Kanton, aber auch über Zürich hinaus fortgeführt werden. Im Gegenzug wird die Präsenz in der Tonhalle bei den Abo-Konzerten – ein unerwartet drastischer Schritt – um ein Drittel, von 15 auf 10 Veranstaltungen, reduziert. Artist in Residence 2015/16 wird der türkische Pianist und Komponist Fazil Say – auch er ein Garant für viel überregionale Aufmerksamkeit.

von Christian Wildhagen

Daniel Hope wird neuer Leiter des ZKO
Tagesanzeiger, 29.04.2015

Der englische Geiger wird ab der Saison 2016/2017 die musikalische Leitung des Zürcher Kammerorchesters übernehmen.

Nun steht es fest: Daniel Hope wird neuer Musical Director des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO) und beerbt den 81-jährigen Roger Norrington, der in Zukunft aufgrund seines Alters kürzertritt. Musical Director? Die Bezeichnung ist für das ZKO ungewohnt, aber passend. Denn Daniel Hope ist von Haus aus kein Dirigent – er wird das Orchester als leitender Solist führen.

Mit Hope wird aber nicht nur ein bekannter Musiker unter Vertrag genommen, sondern es hält auch eine neue Generation Einzug. Schliesslich ist der Geiger mit 41 Jahren nahezu halb so alt wie Roger Norrington. Was den Charme des Grand Old Man Norrington betrifft, der gerne auch mal während einer Haydn-Sinfonie Faxen gegenüber dem Publikum machte, schliesst Hope nahtlos an dessen Kontaktfreude an. Sein Buch «Wann darf ich klatschen?» nimmt dem Publikum augenzwinkernd die Angst vor den geheimen Regeln eines elitären Betriebs und schlägt damit in dieselbe Kerbe wie das ZKO. Gespräche mit den Publikum nach, Conférencen während des Konzerts und ungewöhnliche Formate wie Konzert-Lesungen machen das Orchester zu einem flexiblen und publikumsnahen Klangkörper. Der Kommunikator Hope wird diesen Weg weiterdenken.

Geiger mit Weltformat
Bis dahin muss sich das Publikum aber noch eine Weile gedulden. Der britische Geiger mit Weltformat wird seinen Posten erst übernächste Saison antreten. Weshalb sich das ZKO unter der Obhut des Konzertmeisters Willi Zimmermann in der Saison 2015/2016 vorwiegend auf Gastdirigenten und leitende Solisten konzentrieren wird. Maurice Steger, Steven Isserlis oder Gidon Kremer kommen nach Zürich, und Roger Norrington bleibt dem ZKO mit zwei Konzerten verbunden. Aus der jüngeren Generation treten Jan Lisiecki, Vilde Frang oder Olga Scheps in den Ring. Und, wenn schon von Jugend die Rede ist: Die überaus erfolgreichen Nuggikonzerte werden weitergeführt. Ebenso die ZKO-Box, die Konzerte im Kunsthaus, selbst einen Artist-in-Residence wird es mit Fazil Say wieder geben.

Auch die Erfolgsbilanz des ZKO kann sich sehen lassen. Die Besucherzahlen haben um 50 Prozent zugenommen, die privaten Mittel konnten gesteigert werden, und die Geschäftsführung erwartet eine «schwarzen Null» – eine solide Basis für Daniel Hope. Dieser schliesst mit dem Zürcher Engagement übrigens einen Kreis. Als zweijähriger Knirps machte er seine ersten musikalischen Erfahrungen mit dem ZKO, weil seine Mutter ihn an mehrere Konzerte mitnahm – seither gilt er quasi als Erfinder der Nuggikonzerte avant la lettre.

Von Tom Hellat

Klavierquartette von Brahms, Schumann und Mahler
Aachener Nachrichten, 24.04.2015

„Klavierquartette von Brahms, Schumann und Mahler“ Deutsche Grammophon/Universal

Unter den zurzeit angesagten Geigern ist Daniel Hope sicher einer der respektabelsten. Vielleicht auch deshalb, weil die Seitensprünge des gebürtigen Südafrikaners vom Podium des mit den großen Orchestern der Welt konzertierenden Solisten von so außerordentlicher Qualität sind. Der 41-Jährige hat Alben mit Sting gemacht, mit Sophie van Otter, mit Max Raabe, spielt Jazz und Filmmusik. Er engagiert sich für Amnesty International, äußert sich politisch, gilt nach seiner Zeit beim Beaux Arts Trio als versierter Kammermusiker. Nun lässt er einen Konzert-Mittschnitt aus New  York mit Klavierquartetten vermarkten. Man darf hin- und hergerissen sein.
Der Kopfsatz aus einem unvollendeten Quartett des 16-jährigen Gustav Mahler zeugt von erstaunlicher Reife eines an Schumann und Brahms geschulten Studenten. Und das Ensemble, zu dem sich die PianistinWu Han, der Bratscher Paul Neubauer und David Finckel am Cello gesellen, harmoniert im selten gehörten Werk bestens. Mahlers romantische Seele blüht. Die CD jedoch legt man für Schumann und Brahms ins Laufwerk. Schumanns E-Dur-Quartett ist einfach wunderbare Musik. Hier schon zeigt sich die Krux eines Ensembles, das von einem Weltklasse-Geiger geführt wird. Wenn der Cellist das gesangliche Thema im Andante cantabile anstimmt, ist man gerührt, wenn es Hope wenige Takte später wiederholt, ist man begeistert. Und verärgert zugleich. Denn man hätte doch gern den Eindruck, dass da ähnlich talentierte Musiker zusammenspielten. Nun ist auch Brahms g-Moll-Quartett dank Hopes wunderbaren Impulsen und seiner großen Erfahrung nichts für die Schublade. Im Gegenteil. Irgendwie quillt große Vitalität aus den Boxen, der im Studio aufgehübschte Live-Mitschnitt versprüht unmittelbaren Charme. Immerhin.

Daniel Hope, aventurier des accords perdus
Le Figaro, 21.02.2015

Féru d’histoire, le violoniste livre “Escape to Paradise”, fascinant retour aux sources du “son hollywoodien”

Le Figaro

In the Shadow of Giants – Daniel Hope explores the Golden Age of Hollywood strings
Strings, 23.01.2015



2014


Escape to Paradise: The Hollywood Album. Music by Rózsa, Korngold, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Eisler, Zeisl, Waxman, Jurmann, Weill, Morricone, Heymann, Williams, Hupfeld & Newman
The Strad, 20.11.2014

An over-abundance of riches in an exploration of the Hollywood sound

Musicians
Daniel Hope (violin) Sting, Max Raabe (vocals), Jacques Ammon (piano), Maria Todtenhaupt (harp), Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra/Alexander Shelley, Deutsche Kammerorchester Quintet Berlin

Composer
Rózsa, Korngold, Waxman, Morricone

The centrepiece of Daniel Hope’s latest album is a commanding performance of the Korngold Concerto that exchanges the swashbuckling, rapier-precision authenticity of Heifetz’s premiere recording for a more heart-on-sleeve, portamento-inflected espressivo that makes it sound more than ever like the concerto Richard Strauss might have composed during his tone-poem heyday. Some may feel that for music already so saturated with bravado machismo and cantabile intensity, less is sometimes more. Yet for a full Technicolor exposé, supported to the hilt by rising conducting star Alexander Shelley, and captured  in gloriously lucid sound, there is no doubting its thrilling impact.

On this kind of form, the dream coupling might have been Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s ‘I profeti’ Concerto (another of Heifetz’s ‘west coast’ specialities), with perhaps the Waxman ‘Carmen’ Fantasy thrown in for good measure, but Hope opts for a selection of filmic miniatures by (mostly) European composers working in Hollywood during the 1930s and 40s. Miklós Rózsa (whose stirring Concerto is another masterwork that might have been included here) is represented by love themes from Ben Hur, El Cid and Spellbound, and there’s the rub: all three are magnificent scores heard in context, but excerpted and placed alongside other miniature sweetmeats – no matter how seductively eloquent the playing – makes this an album best dipped into rather than listened to at a single stretch.
by Julian Haylock

Escape to Paradise
Gramophone, 15.10.2014

Einen Traum erfüllt: Daniel Hope und sein Hollywood-Album
hr2-Kultur, 02.10.2014

Was macht man, wenn die Tage wieder kürzer werden und es draußen ungemütlich wird? “Weg von hier”, mag sich der eine oder andere da denken. Da kommt das neue Album von Daniel Hope gerade richtig: “Escape to Paradise” heißt es, ein Hollywood-Album, für das der Stargeiger Musik aufgenommen hat, die beispielhaft ist für den Sound, der die Bilder aus der Traumfabrik seit Jahrzehnten so eindrucksvoll ergänzt.

 

Erschienen ist die CD bei der Deutschen Grammophon, mit Werken von Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Hanns Eisler und Kurt Weill bis hin zu Filmmusik aus Casablanca, Ben Hur, Schindlers Liste oder American Beauty.

Wer Daniel Hope kennt, der weiß, dass er für fantasievolle, ja fantastische Projekte steht, in die er viel Kreativität und Herzblut steckt. Diesmal hat er Musik von Exil-Komponisten aufgenommen, die in der Traumfabrik von Los Angeles gestrandet waren und dort den “Hollywood-Sound” kreierten – ein Klang mit Geschichte und vor allem aus Geschichten. Einzelschicksale, Träume, in Klänge verpackt, und großes, menschliches Kino.

2 Jahre Recherche

Zwei Jahre hat Daniel Hope für sein Album recherchiert. Er stöberte in den Archiven der Paramount Studios und dabei wurde klar, dass in vielen Kompositionen der Gedanke der Flucht mitspielte, das Zurücklassen alter Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft. Auf seiner CD spannt Daniel Hope einen Bogen von dem jungen Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis hin zu Komponisten, die zwar keine Flüchtlinge mehr waren, deren Musik sich aber auf eigene Weise mit dem Thema Flucht beschäftigt: So ist z.B. John Williams‘ Musik zu Schindlers Liste dabei, oder auch das Love Theme aus Cinema Paradiso von Ennio Morricone.

Hollywood schreibt auch Musikgeschichte

Der Hollywood-Sound vom Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten bis heute – mit “Escape to Paradise” ist es Daniel Hope gelungen, den Fokus auf das zu richten, was sonst eher hinter opulenten Bildern verschwindet: denn die Filmindustrie der Traumfabrik hat auch musikalisch Geschichte geschrieben.

Wie waren die Hörgewohnheiten der Komponisten, die aus Europa nach L.A. kamen? Und welchen Einfluss hatten sie auf die Soundtracks von heute? Überflüssig zu sagen, dass es Daniel Hope bei aller Leidenschaft zu vermeiden weiß, sich der Gefühlsduselei hinzugeben. Mit seinem Album verwandelt er sich in einen Regisseur, der zeigt, dass Hollywood mehr ist als eine wunderschöne Kulisse. Mit seiner wandlungsfähigen Geige führt Hope die unterschiedlichsten Bilder vor Augen. Dazu tragen auch Sting, Max Raabe und all die anderen Musiker bei, die bei “Escape to Paradise” mitgewirkt haben, außerdem reizvolle Arrangements, die manchen bekannten Titel in einem ganz neuen Gewand präsentieren, und ein biegsames Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. Mit diesem Album dürfte sich Daniel Hope einen Traum erfüllt haben – und nicht nur sich!

Von Adelheid Kleine

Das war meine Rettung
Zeit Magazin, 01.10.2014

Als den Eltern auf der Flucht das Geld ausging
Sonntagszeitung, 28.09.2014

von Christian Hubschmid

 «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie»: Daniel Hope, 41
Der blaue Siegelring an seinem rechten kleinen Finger leuchtet wie das Meer. Bald muss Daniel Hope auf die Bühne, doch hat er noch schnell Zeit für ein Interview. «Es entspannt mich», sagt der 41-jährige Geiger. Und bittet in seine Künstlergarderobe in der Alten Oper Frankfurt.

«Das Siegel zeigt das Familienwappen meiner Grossmutter», sagt der Brite Hope in perfektem Deutsch. Die Geschichte seiner Familie ist die Geschichte einer mehrmaligen Flucht. Zwar trat die Familie schon im 19. Jahrhundert vom Judentum zum Christentum über, trotzdem wurde Hopes Grossvater 1934 in seiner Heimatstadt Berlin auf offener Strasse ­zusammengeschlagen. Sofort entschied sich der Grossvater, fortzugehen. Nach Südafrika. Von wo später auch Hopes Vater fliehen musste. Als Apartheid-Gegner in den Siebzigerjahren.

Es ist deshalb kein Zufall, dass Daniel Hope nach dem Interview das Violinkonzert des jüdischen Exilanten Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897–1957) spielen wird. Wobei «spielen» eine Untertreibung ist. Hope lässt das Stück knallen, bringt es zur Explosion wie ein Feuerwerk. Und danach wird man sich fragen: Korngold? Warum kennt man diesen fantastischen Komponisten nicht?

 Musik von Komponisten,  die vor den Nazis flüchteten

«Weil Korngold nach seiner Flucht Filmmusik für Hollywood geschrieben hat», sagt Daniel Hope. Zwei Oscars hat er bekommen, nachdem er in den Dreissigerjahren nach Hollywood emigriert war. Erst nach Hitlers Tod konnte er die Orchestermusik schreiben, die er eigentlich schreiben wollte. So erging es ihm wie vielen Flüchtlingen, deren Musik Daniel Hope auf seiner neuen CD «Escape to Paradise» wiederaufleben lässt.

Es ist Musik von Komponisten, die vor den Nazis in die USA flüchteten. Und es ist «nur» Filmmusik. Doch Daniel Hope macht keinen Unterschied zur zweckfreien Kunst. Die Komponisten hätten ein neues Medium mitgeschaffen, sagt Hope: den Soundtrack zum Tonfilm, den es erst seit wenigen Jahren gab. Die Filmfabrik Hollywood engagierte die europäischen Flüchtlinge mit Handkuss. Wenn sie auch nicht alle glücklich machte. Denn Musik am Fliessband zu schreiben, ist nicht jedermanns Ding. Doch sie komponierten «meisterhaft», schwärmt Hope.

Daniel Hope ist einer der wichtigsten Geiger der Gegenwart. Heute Sonntag wird er in Zürich auf der Bühne stehen, am Eröffnungskonzert des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO). Hope ist in der Saison 2014/15 Artist-in-Residence dieses renommierten Orchesters. Er sei mit dem ZKO seit seiner frühesten Kindheit verbunden, erzählt er. Jeden Sommer habe er als Kind in Gstaad verbracht, wo das ZKO jeweils am Menuhin Festival auftrat. «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie», sagt Hope. Und das kam so.

Daniel Hopes Vater, der Schriftsteller Christopher Hope, wurde vom Apartheid-Regime in Südafrika beschattet, weil er sich gegen die Rassentrennung engagierte. Als auch das Telefon abgehört und er bedroht wurde, floh die Familie Hals über Kopf. Erst nach Frankreich, dann nach London.

Mit 27 jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio

«Hier ging uns das Geld aus», erzählt Daniel Hope lachend. Es war vielleicht sein grosses Glück. Denn nun suchte die Mutter einen Job und wurde Sekretärin des grossen Geigers Menuhin. 26 Jahre lang blieb sie an dessen Seite, die meiste Zeit als seine Managerin. Und Daniel Hope verbrachte seine Sommerferien am Menuhin Festival in Gstaad, dem berühmten Virtuosen lauschend, der oft mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester spielte. Das letzte Konzert, das Menuhin als Geiger gab, erlebte Hope in der Kirche von Saanen mit.

Und er wurde selber Geiger. Einer der besten der Welt. Mit 27 war er jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio. Heute kann er sich aussuchen, mit welchen Orchestern und Dirigenten er auftreten will. Er arbeitet auch mit Popkünstlern wie Sting zusammen und veröffentlicht Bücher, von denen jenes über seine Familiengeschichte, «Familienstücke», ein Bestseller wurde.

Was kein Wunder ist, wenn man diese Geschichte kennt. Denn auch Hopes Urgrossmutter war seinerzeit 1939 aus Berlin nach Südafrika geflohen. Nur der Urgrossvater schaffte es nicht. Er nahm sich in Berlin das Leben. Als deutscher Patriot ertrug er den Gedanken, aus seiner Heimat fliehen zu müssen, nicht.

Daniel Hope steht auf und nimmt seine Geige zur Hand. Er sagt, Musik könne die Welt nicht verändern. «Aber sie ist eine Chance, ein Gespräch anzufangen. Und wir können die Katastrophen dieser Welt nur mit Gesprächen aufhalten.»

Dann geht er auf die Bühne.

Daniel Hope spielt heute mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester Werke von Mozart.  Zürich, Tonhalle, 19 Uhr

Escape to Paradise
BR-Klassik, 22.09.2014

Der Geiger Daniel Hope, geboren 1973 in Südafrika, spricht nicht nur fließend Deutsch. Er ist auch bekannt für seine Vielseitigkeit und seine ausgefallenen Programm, die niemals nur unterhaltsam sein wollen sondern meist eine inhaltliche Botschaft haben.

Schon beim CD-Cover fällt auf: Alles ist hier irgendwie nostalgisch geraten. Und eigentlich müsste der Schriftzug im Hintergrund noch “HollywoodLand” heißen – wie zu jenen Zeiten, von denen diese CD erzählt. Es ist die große Ära der europäischen Emigranten. Die Ära des Holocaust. Und der Focus dieses Filmmusik-Album liegt auf jenen jüdisch-europäischen Exilanten, ohne die es den später so genannten “Hollywood Sound” vermutlich nie gegeben hätte: Miklos Rozsa, Franz Waxman und erst recht Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Schwelgerischer als Heifetz

Korngolds Violinkonzert op.35 ist das ausladendste und sicherlich prominenteste Werk dieser CD; ein Werk, das einerseits eng verknüpft ist mit den Soundtracks großer Errol Flynn-Streifen wie “Another Dawn” oder “Der Prinz und der Bettelknabe”, das andererseits aber längst ins feste Repertoire großer Geiger gehört, seit Jascha Heifetz das Werk auf der Konzertbühne uraufführte. Daniel Hopes Interpretation ist deutlich schwelgerischer als diejenige von Heifetz, und sie ist – wie fast alle Darbietungen dieser CD – durchdrungen von Hopes Sendungsbewusstsein. Ihm geht es um jene Botschaft abseits des glamourösen Hollywood-Emblems und um die Aufdeckung durchaus tragischer Begleitumstände, die zu dieser Musik geführt haben.

Begnadeter Geigeninterpret und verbaler Mittler

Der scheinbar beschwingte Walzer aus “Come back, little Sheba” beispielsweise wurde von dem Mann komponiert, den 1934 die Nazis in Berlin auf offener Straße zusammenschlugen und der dann über Paris in die USA emigrierte: Franz Wachsmann, der sich später “Waxman” nannte. Und wenn an anderer Stelle Max Raabes wohlvertraute Nostalgiestimme erklingt, nämlich in Kurt Weills “Speak Low”, dann erhält auch das plötzlich ein ganz anderes Gewicht – dank der Person Daniel Hopes, der hier wieder einmal in einer Doppelrolle agiert: als begnadeter Geigeninterpret und im Begleitheft als verbaler Mittler.
Ein durchaus nachdenklich stimmendes Hollywood-Album!

Von: Matthias Keller

Der Sound von Hollywood
Crescendo, 22.09.2014

Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album
all-access-lounge.de, 19.09.2014

von: Sebastian Hiedels

Von Korngold über »Cinema Paradiso« bis zu Sting: Auf seinem neuen Album findet Daniel Hope einen verblüffenden Schlüssel zur Filmmusik. Sie ist Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten. Eine Breitbild-Spurensuche in Klängen. Das Album ist seit dem 29. August erhältlich.

Hollywood ist der Ort unserer Träume. Doch wenn Daniel Hope ihn nun mit seiner Geige bereist und erforscht, verändert sich unsere Wahrnehmung. Hope beweist, dass der »Hollywood Sound« ein Klang mit Geschichte und aus Geschichten ist. Die Traumfabrik von Los Angeles war ein Ort, an dem Gestrandete ihre Hoffnungen aus den Koffern kramten und ihre Träume in Klänge verpackten. Großes, menschliches Kino mit fatalen Schicksalsschlägen und amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten.

Auf seinem neuen Album begibt sich der Star-Geiger auf eine sinnlich-historische Spurensuche im Breitbildformat. Und wieder gelingt Hope über die Musik ein faszinierender Blick auf die Geschichte: Nachdem er sich bereits mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches beschäftigt hat und mit den von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern, nimmt er dieses Mal die Spuren jener Musiker auf, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang. Eindrücklich lässt Hope hören, dass der Schmerz der Flucht, das Zurücklassen der alten Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« sind. Mit seiner klugen Auswahl zieht der Geiger einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis zu Filmklassikern wie Schindlers Liste und Cinema Paradiso.

Keimzelle ist für Hope das Violinkonzert von Korngold, das er in der Interpretation vom »König der Geiger«, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat. Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für Anthony Adverse und 1939 für The Adventures of Robin Hood. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Ein kluger Gedanke, der auch musikalisch greifbar wird, denn letztlich ist der Film für Hope nichts anderes als eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit.

Hope horcht dem europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert. Mit von der Partie ist Sting mit »The Secret Marriage«, seiner eigenen Version des Hanns Eisler Liedes »An den kleinen Radioapparat«. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und nun singt er den Song noch einmal gemeinsam mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt auch die Oper Hiob von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Und plötzlich wird ganz selbstverständlich klar, dass die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky seine Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood fand. Hier mussten die Exil-Komponisten allerdings ihr Gedanken-Gepäck aus 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. Flucht bedeutet eben immer auch das Zurücklassen alter Traditionen. Ein Thema, das Daniel Hope persönlich verfolgt: Seine Großeltern sind vor Hitler nach Südafrika geflohen, und seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England.

Mit seinem neuen Album reist Hope bis in die Gegenwart. Neben den Klassikern Ben-Hur und El Cid von Miklós Rózsa hat er sich drei Filme und Komponisten ausgesucht, die ebenfalls das Thema Flucht aufgreifen: John Williams als Korngold-Erbe in Schindlers Liste, Thomas Newmans American Beauty und natürlich Ennio Morricone mit seiner Ode an den Fluchtraum Kino in Cinema Paradiso.

Am Ende dieser CD über den »Hollywood Sound« erklingt ein angedeuteter Nachhall: Hope spielt Herman Hupfelds »As Time Goes By« aus dem Filmklassiker Casablanca – ebenfalls eine große Ode an die existenziellen Momente von Menschen auf der Flucht.

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 09.09.2014

Der Geiger und Forscher Daniel Hope erinnert an jüdische Emigranten, die mit Filmmusik eine neue Existenz aufbauten.

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben

Daniel Hope: Darum sind Sting und Max Raabe der Clou an seinem Hollywood Album!
Epoch Times, 06.09.2014

Geiger Daniel Hope ist mit seinem Hollywood-Album erneut ein großer Wurf gelungen.

Am ersten September kam die CD mit dem Titel: „Escape to Paradise“ bei der Deutschen Grammophon heraus. Und die Überschrift verrät es bereits: Den Hörer erwartet hier keinesfalls akustische Zuckerwatte mit Sologeige – es ist eine dramatische Flucht ins Paradies, die hier angetreten wird.

Daniel Hope erforscht mit seinem Album, wie die durch den Holocaust vertriebenen Künstler den Klang von Hollywood kreierten. Wie klassische Komponisten sich in der Filmmusik eine neue Heimat suchen mussten – Und wie trotz all der Schönheit und Süße, die ihre Kompositionen im „Paradies“ der Filmmetropole entfalteten, in ihrer Musik immer noch düstere Schicksale nachklingen, die dem Traum von einer besseren Welt existentielle Tiefe verliehen. Es enstand ein Klang in dem Menschen auf der ganzen Welt ihr eigenes Erleben wiederfanden. Mit „Escape to Paradise“ geht Daniel Hope auf die Suche nach dem Geheimnis dieses betörenden Hollywood-Sounds.

Greatest Hits und Unbekanntes

Daniel Hope macht hier das was er immer macht – und wieder einmal sehr überraschend und überzeugend. Die Musikauswahl enthält sowohl Ohrwürmer, die üblichen Verdächtigen, wie „Schindler´s Liste“, die Liebesthemen aus Ben Hur und El Cid, Ennio Morricones Cinema Paradiso – also das, was der Freizeit-Klassikfan erwartet. Und gleichzeitig führt uns Hope auch an unbekanntere Stücke heran. Das beginnt beim Korngold-Violinkonzert, dass in gewisser Hinsicht der klassische Felsen ist, auf dem die Musik Hollywoods gebaut wurde.

Und es geht weiter mit nostalgischen Perlen, die heutzutage kaum noch jemand kennt, wie zum Beispiel „Tränen in der Geige“ von Walter Jurmann (1903 – 1971) und „Come back, little Sheba“ von Franz Waxman (1906 – 1967).

Unglaublich: Das singen Sting uns Max Raabe!

Typisch Daniel Hope: Er würzt seine Geigen-CD wieder mit hochkarätigen Gästen aus anderen Genres. Böse Zungen könnten jetzt behaupten, dass Max Raabe und Sting hier lediglich als zusätzliche Verkaufsargumente für die Deutsche Grammophon fungieren, aber wer einmal reingehört hat, weiß, die beiden geben dem Album den letzten Schliff und verdichten mit den von ihnen gesungenen Texten den literarischen Subplot – Vertreibung und Vergänglichkeit.

Sting singt auf englisch ein Lied von Hanns Eisler aus „The Secret Marriage“, das melancholischer kaum wirken könnte. Denn es erklingt direkt nach den Haifetz-Arrangement „Sea Murmurs“, jenen sanft glitzernden Wellen, welche die Vertriebenen an die verheißungsvolle Küste der USA gespült haben. Und damit erinnert uns Stings gebrochenes Timbre an die Heimatlosigkeit, welche die Künstler in der neuen Heimat fühlten.

Max Raabes Version von Kurt Weills „Speak Low“ geht dann noch einen Schritt weiter: Das melancholische Lebensgefühl hat sich bereits vollständig in swingende Heiterkeit aufgelöst – scheinbar. Denn um den Abgrund hinter der sonnenbeschienenen Filmkulisse spürbar zu machen, durch die das Lied zu schlendern scheint, braucht es eben einen Max Raabe.

Keine Angst vor großen Gefühlen

Ganz am Ende, nachdem Daniel Hope auch noch einen Ausflug in den „American Beauty“-Soundtrack von Thomas Newman (2000) und die nähere Hollywood-Vergangenheit gemacht hat, schließt er den Kreis wieder in der Vergangenheit mit „Irgendwo auf der Welt gibt’s ein kleines bisschen Glück“ von Werner Richard Heymann. Und mit einem kaum erkennbaren, fragmentarisch-zerbrochenem „As Time goes by“, haucht er seine Hollywood-Träume solistisch aus …

Das alles ist so schonungslos sentimental, dass es ins Auge hätte gehen können. Dank Daniel Hopes musikalischer Leidenschaft, seiner Seelentiefe und dem großen Ernst, mit dem er auch die scheinbar trivialiste Nummer behandelt, trifft es mitten ins Herz.
von Rosemarie Frühauf

 

Daniel Hope: Escape to Paradise – review
Financial Times, 05.09.2014

Pieces played in new arrangements bask luxuriantly romantic world of Korngold, Rosza and their contemporaies

Violinist Daniel Hope shows what happened to the mostly Jewish composers exiled from Nazi Germany when they turned up in the “paradise” of Hollywood.  The result is not an academic exercise – many of the pieces here are played in new arrangements – but an invitation to soak in the luxuriantly romantic world of Korngold, Rozsa and their contemporaries.  Sting makes a guest appearance in a song by Eisler, Max Raabe in one by Weill.  But mostly this is a showcase for Hope’s violin, basking in the saturated emotion of Korngold’s Violin Concerto and soaring through the love themes from films such as Ben-Hur and Hitchcock’s Spellbound.

by Richard Fairman

Es muss ein Thriller sein
Gala, 04.09.2014

Daniel Hope auf der Suche nach dem „Hollywood-Sound“
Kulturradio von RBB, 03.09.2014

Der britische Geigenvirtuose Daniel Hope lädt ein zu einer Reise durch Soundtracks des 20. Jahrhunderts

Daniel Hope ist bekannt für seine Vielseitigkeit – er ist in der Klassik und im Barock ebenso zu Hause wie im Jazz. Seit langem interessiert er sich für europäische Komponisten, die vor oder während des zweiten Weltkriegs nach Hollywood geflüchtet sind und für die Filmstudios komponiert haben. Emigranten wie Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Mario Castel-Nuovo Tedesco , Eric Zeisl oder Miklos Rosza haben mit anderen Kollegen den klassischen “Hollywood-Sound” geprägt. Mit seiner neuen CD “Escape to Paradise” hat Daniel Hope diesen Komponisten ein Denkmal gesetzt.

Kernstück der Platte ist ein Violinkonzert in D-Dur , op. 35, von Erich Wolfgang Korngold in drei Sätzen. Der österreichische Komponist hat es nach seinen Erfolgen in Hollywood komponiert, inspiriert von seinen eigenen Arbeiten für den Film. Daniel Hope spielt das Konzert wohltuend akkurat, sehr eindringlich, technisch perfekt und im wirbelnden Wechsel zwischen schmeichelnd-süß und geradezu vehement fordernd. Dieses Werk zeigt, wie gut Korngold sein Handwerk beherrschte.

 

Das Vermächtnis des Hollywood-Sounds

Daniel Hope schlägt auf “Escape to Paradise” einen Bogen zu Filmen unserer Zeit und hat drei Komponisten ausgewählt, die in der Tradition des “Hollywood-Sounds” stehen: Thomas Newman,  John Williams und Enrico Morricone, die die Soundtracks zu den bekannten Filmen “American Beauty”, “Schindlers Liste” und “Cinema Paradiso” geschrieben haben.  Alle drei Filme beschäftigen sich ebenfalls mit dem Thema Flucht . Daniel Hope gelingt es bei dem Soundtrack zu “American Beauty”, mit seinem sinnlichen Spiel den Schmerz der Einsamkeit, die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Welt und auch die Flucht vor sich selbst, die ja in dem Film zentrales Thema ist, zu vermitteln.

 

Gastsänger Sting und Max Raabe

Gastsänger Sting performt einen eigenen Song “The Secret Marriage”, der auf einer Melodie von Hanns Eisler basiert und Max Raabe singt Kurt Weill zu Hopes Geigentönen  – was das Album umso interessanter macht.

 

Von alten Schätzen zu Neuentdeckungen

Auf “Escape to Paradise” finden sich alte Klassiker wie “As time goes by” arrangiert für Sologeige, und charmante Neuentdeckungen  wie “Sea Murmurs” von Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, arrangiert von Jascha Heifetz.

Mit “Escape to Paradise” kann man schwelgen , nachdenken,  zeitreisen und genießen – ein schöner  Einstieg für Filmfans, die Klassik hören wollen und umgekehrt. Hope versteht es durch sein intensives wendiges Spiel, die Essenz dieser traumumwehten Musik genau einzufangen. Manchen mag es nach zu großen Gefühlen klingen, zu viel Pathos mitschwingen, aber das braucht es mitunter, um die “message” der Filme zu transportieren, sie ohne Bilder sprechen zu lassen. Das gelingt Daniel Hope sehr gut.

Wer keine Angst vor großen Gefühlen hat, wird Gefallen finden an Daniel Hopes Hollywood-Album “Escape to Paradise”.

Anne Spohr, kulturradio

Escape To Paradise: The Hollywood Album
cdstarts.de, 29.08.2014

Ein Ausflug tief in die Seele des Hollywoods der 30er, 40er und 50er Jahre.

Ob Nigel Kennedy oder David Garrett (um nur zwei zu nennen): Von Violinisten geht immer dann eine ganz besondere Faszination für das Pop-Publikum aus, wenn sie in ihrem Fach über den stilistischen Tellerrand hinausschauen und die klassische Musik um Komponenten aus der Unterhaltungsmusik erweitern. Der Südafrikaner Daniel Hope (41) ist ebenfalls einer dieser Star-Geiger, die sich nicht limitieren lassen wollen und zusätzliche Facetten in ihr Spiel einbringen. Mit seinem neuesten Album, das sich dem Sound der Film-Metropole Hollywood widmet, wird das deutlicher denn je.

Grundsätzlich neu ist die Idee zwar nicht, mehr oder weniger bekannte Themen großer Hollywood-Filme auf die ureigene Art eines Musikers neu einzuspielen, aber wenigstens hetzt Daniel Hope nicht durch ein Sammelsurium der üblichen Blockbuster-Melodien, sondern verfolgt ein echtes Konzept, das tief in die Seele des Hollywoods der 30er, 40er und 50er Jahre eintaucht und nur wenige Ausnahmen zulässt, wie die Themen aus „Nuovo Cinema Paradiso“ (1988), „Schindler’s List“ (1993) und „American Beauty“ (1999). Eine ausführliche Erklärung zu den Hintergründen der ausgewählten Stücke findet sich übrigens in dem sehr informativ aufgemachten Booklet des Albums!

So ist „Escape To Paradise: The Hollywood Album“ eine Mischung aus dem Spiel von Daniel Hopes Solo-Violine und den Breitwandklängen klassischer Soundtracks, die bis auf zwei Ausnahmen rein instrumental vorgetragen wird: Die Label-Kollegen Sting in „Love theme“ aus dem Film „El Cid“ und der Deutsche Max Raabe in „Speak low“ steuern die einzigen Gesangsparts zu dem Album bei. Ein bisschen Crossover-Potenzial für eine bessere Vermarktung muss eben sein. Wie gut, wenn man bei einem Sublabel des Universal-Konzerns unter Vertrag steht.

„Escape To Paradise: The Hollywood Album“ ist ein Special-Interest-Werk, das sowohl Klassik-, als auch Soundtrack-Freunde ansprechen soll. Doch am Ende behält die Klassik die Oberhand. Schließlich drückt Daniel Hope den Stücken mit seinem Violinen-Spiel seinen ganz persönlichen Stempel auf. Dieser ist weniger speziell als vermutet, aber immer noch so stark ausgeprägt, dass Freunde von Violinenklängen am ehesten auf ihre Kosten kommen.

Link: http://www.cdstarts.de/musikreview/116304-Daniel-Hope-Escape-To-Paradise-The-Hollywood-Album.html

Daniel Hope “Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album” | ab heute im Handel
entertainment-base.de, 29.08.2014

Von Korngold über »Cinema Paradiso« bis zu Sting: Auf seinem neuen Album (VÖ: 29.08.) findet Daniel Hope einen verblüffenden Schlüssel zur Filmmusik. Sie ist Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten. Eine Breitbild-Spurensuche in Klängen. Hollywood ist der Ort unserer Träume. Doch wenn Daniel Hope ihn nun mit seiner Geige bereist und erforscht, verändert sich unsere Wahrnehmung. Hope beweist, dass der »Hollywood Sound« ein Klang mit Geschichte und aus Geschichten ist. Die Traumfabrik von Los Angeles war ein Ort, an dem Gestrandete ihre Hoffnungen aus den Koffern kramten und ihre Träume in Klänge verpackten. Großes, menschliches Kino mit fatalen Schicksalsschlägen und amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten.

Auf seinem neuen Album begibt sich der Star-Geiger auf eine sinnlich-historische Spurensuche im Breitbildformat. Und wieder gelingt Hope über die Musik ein faszinierender Blick auf die Geschichte: Nachdem er sich bereits mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches beschäftigt hat und mit den von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern, nimmt er dieses Mal die Spuren jener Musiker auf, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang. Eindrücklich lässt Hope hören, dass der Schmerz der Flucht, das Zurücklassen der alten Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« sind. Mit seiner klugen Auswahl zieht der Geiger einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis zu Filmklassikern wie Schindlers Liste und Cinema Paradiso.

Keimzelle ist für Hope das Violinkonzert von Korngold, das er in der Interpretation vom »König der Geiger«, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat. Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für Anthony Adverse und 1939 für The Adventures of Robin Hood. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Ein kluger Gedanke, der auch musikalisch greifbar wird, denn letztlich ist der Film für Hope nichts anderes als eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit.

Hope horcht dem europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert. Mit von der Partie ist Sting mit »The Secret Marriage«, seiner eigenen Version des Hanns Eisler Liedes »An den kleinen Radioapparat«. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und nun singt er den Song noch einmal gemeinsam mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt auch die Oper Hiob von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Und plötzlich wird ganz selbstverständlich klar, dass die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky seine Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood fand. Hier mussten die Exil-Komponisten allerdings ihr Gedanken-Gepäck aus 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. Flucht bedeutet eben immer auch das Zurücklassen alter Traditionen. Ein Thema, das Daniel Hope persönlich verfolgt: Seine Großeltern sind vor Hitler nach Südafrika geflohen, und seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England.

Mit seinem neuen Album reist Hope bis in die Gegenwart. Neben den Klassikern Ben-Hur und El Cid von Miklós Rózsa hat er sich drei Filme und Komponisten ausgesucht, die ebenfalls das Thema Flucht aufgreifen: John Williams als Korngold-Erbe in Schindlers Liste, Thomas Newmans American Beauty und natürlich Ennio Morricone mit seiner Ode an den Fluchtraum Kino in Cinema Paradiso.

Am Ende dieser CD über den »Hollywood Sound« erklingt ein angedeuteter Nachhall: Hope spielt Herman Hupfelds »As Time Goes By« aus dem Filmklassiker Casablanca – ebenfalls eine große Ode an die existenziellen Momente von Menschen auf der Flucht.

Link: http://www.entertainment-base.de/2014/08/29/album-daniel-hope-escape-to-paradise-the-hollywood-album-ab-29-08-im-handel/

DANIEL HOPE – Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album
terrorverlag.com, 29.08.2014

DANIEL HOPE ist ein südafrikanisch-britischer Geiger, der berühmt ist für seine Musikalität und Vielseitigkeit. Auf seinem neuen Album „Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album“ beschäftigt er sich mit Filmmusik aus der Feder europäischer Exil-Komponisten, die den Hollywood-Sound kreierten. Zu hören gibt es beispielsweise Themen aus Filmklassikern wie „Ben Hur“ oder „Schindlers Liste“ – gesanglich unterstützt von STING und MAX RAABE. Außerdem mit von der Partie: das Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra unter der Leitung von Alexander Shelley, der Pianist Jacques Ammon und Maria Todtenhaupt an der Harfe.

Keimzelle war für den 41-jährigen das Violinkonzert von Korngold, der 1934 nach Hollywood emigrierte und zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken erhielt. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Das europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre zeichnet er nach, indem er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert: Mit STINGs eigener Version des Hanns-Eisler-Liedes „An den kleinen Radioapparat“ das hier „The Secret Marriage“ heißt und mit MAX RAABE, der „Speak Low“ von Kurt Weill performt. Die musikalische Reise auf „Escape To Paradise“ reicht vom Jahr 1908 („Prelude And Serenade“ aus „Der Schneemann“ von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis hin zur jüngsten Vergangenheit, die beispielhaft mit dem Titelstück aus „American Beauty“ aus der Feder von Thomas Newman repräsentiert wird. Ein Komponist wie ENNIO MORRICONE darf natürlich ebenfalls nicht fehlen. Hier sei das „Love Theme“ aus „Cinema Paradiso“ genannt.

Großes Kino – sowohl optisch als auch (wie im Falle dieser CD) akustisch. Zweifellos ist diese Klassik-Veröffentlichung nicht unbedingt das, was die Terrorverlag-Leserschaft zwischendurch mal eben in den CD-Player schiebt, aber dem einen oder anderen Cineasten mit gewissen Neigungen zur sogenannten ernsten Musik wird hier bestimmt das Herz aufgehen.

Link: http://www.terrorverlag.com/rezensionen/daniel-hope/escape-paradise-hollywood-album/

Daniel Hope – „Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album“
echte-leute.de, 28.08.2014

Von Korngold über »Cinema Paradiso« bis zu Sting: Auf seinem neuen Album (VÖ: 29.08.) findet Daniel Hope einen verblüffenden Schlüssel zur Filmmusik. Sie ist Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten. Eine Breitbild-Spurensuche in Klängen.

Hollywood ist der Ort unserer Träume. Doch wenn Daniel Hope ihn nun mit seiner Geige bereist und erforscht, verändert sich unsere Wahrnehmung. Hope beweist, dass der »Hollywood Sound« ein Klang mit Geschichte und aus Geschichten ist. Die Traumfabrik von Los Angeles war ein Ort, an dem Gestrandete ihre Hoffnungen aus den Koffern kramten und ihre Träume in Klänge verpackten. Großes, menschliches Kino mit fatalen Schicksalsschlägen und amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten.

Auf seinem neuen Album begibt sich der Star-Geiger auf eine sinnlich-historische Spurensuche im Breitbildformat. Und wieder gelingt Hope über die Musik ein faszinierender Blick auf die Geschichte: Nachdem er sich bereits mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches beschäftigt hat und mit den von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern, nimmt er dieses Mal die Spuren jener Musiker auf, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang. Eindrücklich lässt Hope hören, dass der Schmerz der Flucht, das Zurücklassen der alten Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« sind. Mit seiner klugen Auswahl zieht der Geiger einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis zu Filmklassikern wie Schindlers Liste und Cinema Paradiso.

Keimzelle ist für Hope das Violinkonzert von Korngold, das er in der Interpretation vom »König der Geiger«, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat. Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für Anthony Adverse und 1939 für The Adventures of Robin Hood. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Ein kluger Gedanke, der auch musikalisch greifbar wird, denn letztlich ist der Film für Hope nichts anderes als eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit.

Hope horcht dem europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert. Mit von der Partie ist Sting mit »The Secret Marriage«, seiner eigenen Version des Hanns Eisler Liedes »An den kleinen Radioapparat«. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und nun singt er den Song noch einmal gemeinsam mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt auch die Oper Hiob von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Und plötzlich wird ganz selbstverständlich klar, dass die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky seine Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood fand. Hier mussten die Exil-Komponisten allerdings ihr Gedanken-Gepäck aus 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. Flucht bedeutet eben immer auch das Zurücklassen alter Traditionen. Ein Thema, das Daniel Hope persönlich verfolgt: Seine Großeltern sind vor Hitler nach Südafrika geflohen, und seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England.

Mit seinem neuen Album reist Hope bis in die Gegenwart. Neben den Klassikern Ben-Hur und El Cid von Miklós Rózsa hat er sich drei Filme und Komponisten ausgesucht, die ebenfalls das Thema Flucht aufgreifen: John Williams als Korngold-Erbe in Schindlers Liste, Thomas Newmans American Beauty und natürlich Ennio Morricone mit seiner Ode an den Fluchtraum Kino in Cinema Paradiso.

Am Ende dieser CD über den »Hollywood Sound« erklingt ein angedeuteter Nachhall: Hope spielt Herman Hupfelds »As Time Goes By« aus dem Filmklassiker Casablanca – ebenfalls eine große Ode an die existenziellen Momente von Menschen auf der Flucht

Link: http://www.echte-leute.de/daniel-hope-escape-to-paradise-the-hollywood-album/

Jäger des grossen Klanges
Focus (de), 25.08.2014

Focus Artikel: Link

Flucht ins Paradies – Künstlerexil Hollywood
stagecat.de, 25.08.2014

Daniel Hope hat mit der Deutschen Grammophon ein ungewöhnliches Projekt umgesetzt. Der Star-Violinist und Buchautor hat sich auf seinem neuen Album “Escape to Paradise” auf eine musikalische Spurensuche in Hollywood begeben, an seiner Seite Max Raabe und Sting.
In den letzten Jahren hatte sich der Wahl-Wiener mit Komponisten und Musikern beschäftigt, die das Hitler-Regime in Europa nicht überlebten. Auf seinem neuen ‘Hollywood Album’ bringt er nun jene Künstler zu Gehör, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang und die sich in der neuen Welt, der Traumfabrik Hollywoods als Menschen und Künstler neu finden mussten. In ihre Arbeit brachten sie die Erfahrung von Vertreibung und Flucht ein. Daniel Hope spürt in den Werken dieser Hollywood-Künstler dem wahren Sound der Traumfabrik nach, den Geschichten und Erfahrungsräumen unterhalb des inszenierten Bombastes.

Ort der Gestrandeten

Daniel Hopes Familiengeschichte ist mit dem Thema Exil eng verbunden. Seine Großeltern flohen vor dem Hitler-Regime nach Südafrika, seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England. Musik als Medium der Kommunikation ist ein Schlüssel zum künstlerischen Werk Daniel Hopes und dessen gesellschaftlichem Engagement mit der Freya-von-Moltke-Stiftung, Yehudi Menuhins Live-Music-Now-Stiftung oder mit Amnesty International gleichermaßen. Hope sucht in den Tönen die vergessenen Geschichten der Menschen auf und regt zu neuen Perspektiven auf vermeintlich Altbekanntes an.

Die Traumfabrik Hollywoods und ihre legendären Filmmusiken macht Hope hörbar als einen Ort der Hoffnung für gestrandete Künstler, deren vorheriges Leben auf das Volumen eines Koffers geschrumpft war. Dem Fatum eines grausamen Schicksals entkommen arbeiteten diese Künstler, denen nicht viel mehr geblieben war, als ihr Talent, zugleich an den cineastischen Visionen Hollywoods, wie an der eigenen Hoffnung auf Zukunft. Eindrücklich arbeitet Daniel Hope in seiner musikalischen Umsetzung den Schmerz der Flucht, den Verlust der alten Kultur und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft als die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« heraus. Seine Auswahl zieht einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold, dem einstigen Wunderkind der österreichischen klassischen Moderne und legendärem Opernkomponisten, bis zu Filmklassikern wie “Schindlers Liste” und “Cinema Paradiso”.

Leitmotiv “Flucht”

Nachdem sich Hope mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches und von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern beschäftigt hat, gilt seine Aufmerksamkeit diesmal denen, deren Flucht gelang. “Escape to Paradise” konzentriert sich nicht auf biographische Spuren des Exils, sondern sucht ebenso in der filmmusikalischen Bearbeitung des Themas Flucht nach Zusammenhängen, nach Hollywoods Schicksals-Melodie. In der Auswahl der Werke kam dabei, so Hope, “eine Art Mosaik zusammen”. “Hollywood war geradezu ein Sinnbild für Flucht, auf vielen verschiedenen Ebenen. Man kann das Album auch als eine Suche nach dem wahren ‘Hollywood Sound’ betrachten”.

So kommen neben den Exil-Komponisten der ersten Stunde auch drei lebende Komponisten zu Gehör. John Williams, der die meisten Oscar-Nominierungen erhielt, sieht Hope mit der Filmmusik zu “Schindler’s Liste” in klarer Tradition zu Korngold. Dessen Violinkonzert, das Hope in der Interpretation vom “König der Geiger”, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat, ist die zentrale Interpretationsfolie und Keimzelle des Hollywood-Sound, wie Hope ihn hört.

Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für “Anthony Adverse” und 1939 für “The Adventures of Robin Hood”. Dessen leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Letztlich ist der Film für Hope eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit, somit auch ein Ort symbolischer Befreiung.

Daneben bringt Hope Thomas Newman, Sohn des legendären Hollywood-Komponisten Alfred Newman, zu Gehör, der in “American Beauty” von “der Flucht von einem Leben in ein anderes erzählt”. Zur Vertiefung der Sound-Geschichte Hollywoods wird Ennio Morricone herangezogen, der in “Cinema Paradiso” die Weltflucht des Jungen Salvatore ins Kino untermalt. So reist Hope mit seinem neuen Album über Klassiker wie “Ben-Hur” und “El Cid” von Miklós Rózsa bis in die Gegenwart und horcht dem fernen Hall des Echos der 1930er-Jahre in Europa nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert.

Zwischen Tradition und Neuanfang

Bei seiner musikalischen Spurensuche im Breitbandformat erhält Hope prominente Unterstützung. Sting singt sein eigene Textversion zu Hanns Eislers Lied “An den kleinen Radioapparat”. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und singt “The Secret Marriage” nun mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt die Oper “Hiob” von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Die europäischen Traditionen, denen die Exilanten verbunden waren, werden noch in den Brüchen deutlich. Die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler fand über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky ihre Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood. Die Exil-Komponisten mussten ihre Prägung in der 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. So verschmolz die Musiktradition der alten Welt, die Erfahrung von Flucht und Vertreibung, mit den Melodien der Traumfabrik zu amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten, deren innewohnende Brüche und Tragödien Daniel Hope hörbar macht.

Text: Mirco Drewes

Link: http://stagecat.de/klatsch.php?eintrag=25082014194



2013


What’s Still Timeless About ‘Seasons’
The Wall Street Journal, 23.08.2013

By DANIEL HOPE – I first experienced Vivaldi as a toddler at Yehudi Menuhin’s festival in Gstaad, Switzerland, in 1975. One day I heard what I thought was birdsong coming from the stage. It was the opening solo of “La Primavera” from the “Four Seasons.” It had such an electrifying effect that I still call it my “Vivaldi Spring.” How was it possible to conjure up so vivid, so natural a sound, with just a violin?

Opinions of Vivaldi divide between those who adore and those who despise him. Ask the average person if he recognizes a classical melody, however poorly hummed, and he will probably nod enthusiastically at the second theme of “Spring” from the “Four Seasons.” On the other hand, Igor Stravinsky summed up the case for the other side when he quipped, “Vivaldi wrote one concerto, 400 times.”

Yes, Vivaldi was incredibly prolific. Nonetheless, his most famous work remains his “Four Seasons.” To understand this masterpiece, it helps to shed a little light on the rise and fall of one of the greatest violinists of the 18th century. Born in Venice in 1678 into a desperately poor family, Vivaldi chose the priesthood early on—it offered good chances of advancement. But his plans were scuppered when his severe asthma meant that he was unable to conduct long masses and because, gossip has it, he would nip out for a glass of something during the sermon.

What changed his life forever was an unusual job offer. In 1703 a Venetian orphanage, the Ospedale della Pietà, which provided musical training to the illegitimate and abandoned young daughters of wealthy noblemen, asked Vivaldi to direct its orchestra. Vivaldi understood immediately that he had a unique ensemble at his disposal. Many of his greatest works were written for these young ladies to perform. Very soon, all Europe was enthralled.

He remained there for 12 years and, after an itinerant period working in Vicenza and Mantua, returned to Venice in 1723. The 1720s were a difficult time. The bursting of the “South Sea Bubble” triggered a recession that spread across Europe. Vivaldi needed an income. So in 1723 he set about writing a series of works he boldly titled “Il Cimento dell’ Armonia e dell’invenzione” (“The trial of harmony and invention”), Opus 8. It consists of 12 concerti, seven of which—”Spring,” “Summer,” “Autumn” and “Winter” (which make up the “Four Seasons”), “Pleasure,” “The Hunt” and “Storm at Sea”—paint astonishingly vivid, vibrant scenes. In “Storm at Sea,” Vivaldi reached a new level of virtuosity, pushing technical mastery to the limit as the violinist’s fingers leap and shriek across the fingerboard, recalling troubled waters.

In the score, each of the four seasons are prefaced by four sonnets, possibly Vivaldi’s own, that establish each concerto as a musical image of that season. At the top of every movement, Vivaldi gives us a written description of what we are about to hear. These range from “the blazing sun’s relentless heat, men and flocks are sweltering” (“Summer”) to peasant celebrations (“Autumn”) in which “the cup of Bacchus flows freely, and many find their relief in deep slumber.” Images of warmth and wine are wonderfully intertwined. When the faithful hound “barks” in the slow movement of “Spring,” we experience it just as clearly as the patter of raindrops on the roof in the largo of “Winter.” No composer of the time got music to sing, speak and depict quite like this.

Vivaldi’s fame spread. He received commissions from King Louis XV of France and Rome’s Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni. When Prince Johann Ernst returned to his court at Weimar from an Italian tour, he brought with him a selection of Vivaldi’s earlier, 12-concerto “L’Estro Armonico” (“Harmonic Inspiration”) and presented it to the young organist Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach was so taken with the music that he rearranged several of the concertos for different instrumentation. A legend was born. Johann Friedrich Armand von Uffenbach exclaimed: “Vivaldi played a solo accompaniment—splendid—to which he appended a cadenza which really frightened me, for such playing has never been nor can be: he brought his fingers up to only a straw’s distance from the bridge, leaving no room for the bow—and that on all four strings with imitations and incredible speed.”

But Vivaldi’s fame was eventually to become his greatest enemy. People said that “Il Prete rosso” (“the red priest,” due to his flowing red locks) was surely in league with the devil—seducing those poor defenseless orphans, whose corsets he untied with a mere flick of his bow. The pope threatened him with excommunication. Suddenly, he was out of fashion. Once again he was broke. In May 1740, he headed to Vienna, where Emperor Charles VI had once offered him a position. He died there a year later, and was buried in a pauper’s grave.

Centuries passed. Dust gathered on the red priest’s music. A revival of sorts began when scholars in Dresden began to uncover Vivaldi manuscripts in the 1920s. But what really redeemed him was the record industry. Alfredo Campoli released a live recording of the “Four Seasons” in 1939. But, at least indirectly, the greatest revival of the “Seasons” occurred thanks to Hollywood. Louis Kaufman, an American violinist and concertmaster for more than 400 movie soundtracks, including “Gone With the Wind” and “Cleopatra,” recorded the “Four Seasons” for the Concert Hall Society. It won the 1950 Grand Prix du Disque.

Today the “Four Seasons,” with more than 1,000 available recordings, are not just rediscovered—they are being reimagined. Astor Piazzolla, Uri Caine, Philip Glass and others have all created their own versions. In Spring 2012, I received an enigmatic call from the British composer Max Richter, who said he wanted to “recompose” the “Four Seasons” for me. His problem, he explained, was not with the music, but how we have treated it. We are subjected to it in supermarkets, elevators or when a caller puts you on hold. Like many of us, he was deeply fond of the “Seasons” but felt a degree of irritation at the music’s ubiquity. He told me that because Vivaldi’s music is made up of regular patterns, it has affinities with the seriality of contemporary postminimalism, one style in which he composes. Therefore, he said, the moment seemed ideal to reimagine a new way of hearing it.

I had always shied away from recording Vivaldi’s original. There are simply too many other versions already out there. But Mr. Richter’s reworking meant listening again to what is constantly new in a piece we think we are hearing when, really, we just blank it out. The album, “Recomposed By Max Richter: Four Seasons,” was released late last year. With his old warhorse refitted for the 21st century, the inimitable red priest rides again.

article appeared August 23, 2013, on page C13 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal

Wien ist ein Rückzugsort
Wiener Zeitung, 11.04.2013

Stargeiger und Entertainer Daniel Hope ist weltweit unterwegs und in Wien zu Hause

Von Daniel Wagner

Was dem Stargeiger und Wahlwiener Daniel Hope an seinem Wohnsitz gefällt.

Wien. Frühstück im Dritten. Kann eine Stadt inspirieren? Daniel Hope stimmt zu. Hier kann er alles aufsaugen, die Vergangenheit ist so gegenwärtig wie nirgendwo anders. Wobei die Besonderheit für den Stargeiger die Mischung macht. Wien sei eindeutig ein Schmelztiegel, mitten in Europa, die Nähe zum Balkan, die türkische Vergangenheit. Bei allen Unterschieden verwenden dennoch alle irgendwie die gleiche Sprache. “Abgesehen davon bin ich wahrscheinlich der weltgrößte Fan von Jugendstil”, sagt Hope und lacht.

Natürlich kann Wien für einen Musiker das Zentrum der Welt sein. Allein wenn er durch die City geht und Gedenktafeln von Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven bis zurück zu Vivaldi seinen Weg kreuzen, kann er nur staunen.

Journalistische Triebkräfte
Hat Wien für ihn nicht zu musealen Charakter? Der medial erfahrene Publikumsliebling schüttelt den Kopf. Durch das Wissen um die kulturelle Vergangenheit habe gerade hierzulande die Kultur einen besonderen Stellenwert inne. Denn in der gegenwärtigen Krise wird weltweit bekanntlich zuerst an der Kultur gespart. Zwei Ausnahmen fallen nach Hope hier auf: Deutschland und besonders Österreich, wo die Wertschätzung den Kunstschaffenden gegenüber vorbildlich sei.

Apropos Deutschland: Die Fernsehlandschaft der Nachbarn erkor ihn in den letzten Jahren gerne zum moderierenden Musiker. Klassik erklärt aus dem Mund des Praktikers. Wie wurde man auf seine Entertainer-Qualitäten aufmerksam? Dass er journalistische Triebkräfte hat, wurde ihm schon als Herausgeber der Schulzeitung im südafrikanischen Durban bewusst. Dann das eigentliche Geschäft: Yehudi Menuhin förderte ihn während und nach dem Studium am Londoner Royal College of Music. 2002 folgte er dem Ruf des immer umtriebigen Menahem Pressler (unlängst gab der 89-jährige Pianist sein Wiener Solodebüt). Hope wurde der letzte Geiger des legendären Beaux Arts Trios. Woran er bei dem Ensemblegründer denkt? “Wenn Pressler spielt, ist er einfach Musik. Dieses Gefühl kann nur er verbreiten.” Daneben die internationale Solokarriere. Zum Fernsehen kam er aus purem Zufall. Ein Regisseur bei Arte bat ihn während Dreharbeiten, nicht nur zu spielen, sondern auch zu moderieren. Und es hat Spaß gemacht.

Immer wieder Wien. Auch persönliche Gründe zogen ihn hierher, lebt doch die Mutter seit 20 Jahren mit ihrem zweiten Mann, dem Sänger Benno Schollum, in der Stadt. So schließt sich der Kreis zur komplexen Familienhistorie, Hope bezieht sich väterlicherseits auf katholisch-irische Vorfahren, mütterlicherseits führen die Wurzeln ganz deutlich nach Wien. Genauso wie nach Berlin. Die deutsch-jüdische Provenienz wurde der Familie zum Verhängnis. Ribbentrop persönlich enteignete einen Urgroßvater und machte dessen Berliner Villa zur Dechiffrierstation der Nazis. Der andere, seines Zeichens erfolgreicher Journalist, begrüßte den Machtwechsel. Bis er merkte, dass er “Volljude” war und Selbstmord beging. Der Urenkel feiert im heutigen Deutschland große Erfolge. Gibt es Schatten der Vergangenheit? “Ich liebe das Land, arbeite gerne dort, aber Wien gibt mir die nötige Distanz zur Familiengeschichte.”

“Ich habe das Gefühl, dass oft 300 verschiedene Projekte gleichzeitig durch meinen Kopf schwirren. Ich schnappe etwas auf, manches liegt Jahrzehnte, vieles wird verwirklicht.” Beispielsweise sein unlängst veröffentlichten Album “Spheres”: Schon als Kind liebt er sein Teleskop, über Yehudi Menuhin lernte er den US-Astronomen Carl Sagan kennen und erfuhr von Sphärenmusik, neulich hörte er eine Radiosendung darüber, und währenddessen entstand das Konzept für die Aufnahmen. Es ist Musik zum Ausspannen, fernab des tagtäglichen Wahnsinns. “Wo wir doch so klein in der Milchstraße sind, müssen wir uns die begründete Frage stellen, was es noch da draußen gibt.”

Mit Daniel Hope in den Kosmos schweben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 02.03.2013

von Ernst Strobl

Im Fernsehprogramm wird er so angekündigt: „Einer der besten Geiger der Welt ist Daniel Hope. Bereits mit elf Jahren trat der britische Musiker mit Yehudi Menuhin auf, der ihn einmal als seinen musikalischen Enkel bezeichnete. Über 100 Konzerte gibt Daniel Hope jedes Jahr, immer mit dabei ist seine Guarneri-Geige von 1742 . . .“ Okay, er ist Geiger, aber das ist längst nicht al les. Daniel Hope ist wohl so etwas wie ein Tausendsassa. Neben der weltumspannenden Konzerttätigkeit ist er seit zehn Jahren Künstlerischer Leiter des Savannah Musical Festivals in Georgia, sein Amt als Künstlerischer Direktor des Festivals Mecklenburg-Vorpommern legt er heuer nach vielen Jahren nieder.

Und natürlich nimmt Hope CDs auf. Soeben ist eine der faszinierendsten Aufnahmen der jüngeren Zeit erschienen, mit denen Hope die Hörer wahrhaft in höhere Sphären entführt. Ihn an seinem neuen Wohnsitz Wien anzutreffen, ist nicht einfach. Vor ein paar Tagen passte es. Hope kam eben von Konzerten aus den USA zurück, wo er auch den 89-jährigen Pianisten Menahem Pressler besuchte, der ihn vor Jahren zum Beaux Arts Trio geholt hatte. Es folgte ein Abend mit Klaus Maria Brandauer in Zürich, Wien diente zum Umsteigen nach Göteborg, wo er am Donnerstag mit dem Britten-Violinkonzert bejubelt wurde. Heute, Samstag, ist Hope im SWR Fernsehen zu sehen.

„Spheres“ ist der Titel der CD, ist das was für Esoteriker? Ja, das habe er gern, sagt Hope. Es sei eine schöne Vorstellung, dass Planeten bei ihrer „Begegnung“ Sphärenklänge erzeugten. Hörbarer funktioniert das auf der Geige, wo Reibung Töne erzeugt. Und was für welche! Hope achtete auf die Dramaturgie bei der Auswahl der 18 Stücke. Begleitet vom Dirigenten Simon Hal sey, Kammerorchester, Chor oder Klavier zieht er fragile, innige oder glänzende Fäden über fast filmische Musik vom Barock über Phil Glass bis zu Arvo Pärt, Lera Auerbach und Ludovico Einaudi. Eine intensive, geglückte Entdeckungsreise – auch ohne Sternenhimmel zum Rauf- und Runterhören schön.

CD. Daniel Hope, „Spheres“, u. a. mit Jacques Ammon, Klavier, Deutsches Kammerorchester Berlin, Rundfunkchor Berlin. Deutsche Grammophon. TV. Daniel Hope zu Gast bei Frank Elstner. SWR, Samstag, 21.50 Uhr.

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? Daniel Hope verzaubert mit seiner Geige: CD „Spheres“
The Epoch Times, 28.02.2013

“Komponisten und Werke aus verschiedenen Jahrhunderten zusammenbringen, die man normalerweise nicht in derselben Galaxie findet“, so umschrieb Daniel Hope das Konzept seines neuen Albums, das jüngst bei der Deutschen Grammophon erschienen ist. Der verbindende Gedanke hinter der Musik von „Spheres“ sei die Frage: „Ist da draußen irgendetwas?“

Astronomie fasziniert den britischen Geiger Daniel Hope seit Kindheitstagen und Sternenbeobachtung war neben der Musik seine große Leidenschaft. Da konnte es nicht ausbleiben, dass Hope ein „zeitgemäßes Statement“ zur Sphärenmusik abgeben wollte, jenem seit Urzeiten beschriebenen, selbsterzeugten Klang der Planeten.

Dass „Spheres“ als Konzeptalbum kein Marketing-Gag, sondern eine echte Entdeckungsreise ist, merkt der Hörer spätestens am filigranen Tonfall der CD und ihrer eigenwilligen Zusammenstellung. „Spheres“ vereint musikalische Organismen aus vier Jahrhunderten, ohne nach dem „E“ oder „U“ ihrer Herkunft zu fragen. Und „Spheres“ ist eine jener Sammlungen geworden, die man sehr oft hören kann, ohne dass sie ihren Glanz verliert. Das liegt vor allem an der Qualität der Stücke und ihrer Interpretation, fünf davon sind Weltersteinspielungen, andere speziell neu arrangiert. Sogar Filmmusiken wurden ihrem Entstehungskontext entführt und fanden auf dem Planeten „Kammermusik“ ein neues Zuhause; wegen der Hingabe aller Beteiligten ein künstlerisch glaubwürdiges zumal.

Zu Hopes superbem Geigenspiel gesellen sich Jacques Ammon am Klavier, das Deutsche Kammerorchester Berlin unter Simon Halsey mit kongenialen und ebenbürtigen Streichersolisten, sogar Mitglieder des Rundfunkchores Berlin. Das Klangspektrum, das Daniel Hope seiner Guaneri entlockt, ist faszinierend: Er haucht, singt, schwelgt, spricht mit den Anderen oder ist einsamer Sucher, täuscht Sordinoklänge an, um im nächsten Moment zu vollem Sound aufzublühen, ist Seele der Handlung ohne je selbstgefälliger Virtuose zu sein.

Die CD „Spheres“ hat eine intelligente Dramaturgie, die von einer Ausnahme abgesehen, nahtlos fließt. Sie beginnt mit Bach-Vorläufer Johann Paul von Westhoff („Imitazione delle campane“, ca.1690) in geheimnisvollem Arpeggio-Geflüster und schließt im Heute mit dem fragenden Monolog einer Geige vor dunkler Orchester-Wolkenwand (Karsten Gundermanns „Faust – Episode 2 – Nachspiel“). Zwischen die vielen kurzen Stücke fügt sich „Fratres“, ein rund zwölfminütiger und atemberaubender Arvo Pärt. Ludovico Enaudis „I giorni“ und „Passaggio“ entpuppen sich als wahre Perlen. Karl Jenkins „Benedictus“ wird zum rührenden Dialog von Geige und Chor, der in großem Pathos gipfelt, das hier jedoch zarter und zerbrechlicher als im Original erklingt. Das dreieinhalbminütige Herzstück „Spheres“ von Gabriel Prokofiev behandelt als atonalste Komposition das Thema der Planetenbewegung als sich mechanisch verschiebende Stimmen, zwischen denen Harmonie und Dissonanz entsteht.

Alles ist wunderbar stimmig, bis auf ein Kuschelklassik-Ei, das sich Hope laut Booklet mit voller Absicht selbst gelegt hat: Es ist der „Cantique de Jean Racine“ von Gabriel Fauré, den er während seiner Schulzeit öfter gesungen hat und ereilt den Hörer auf Track 4: Nachdem die Gehörgänge gerade mit minimalistischen Achtelbewegungen von Philip Glass massiert wurden und man langsam in die subtile Klangwelt der CD hineingeschwebt ist, wirkt das spätromantische Chorwerk mit seinen Schmelzklängen und weihnachtlichem Charakter süßlich triefend und wie Creme Bruleé auf nüchternen Magen – obwohl es beispielhaft gesungen ist! Zu allem Überfluss schweigt hier die erwartete Solovioline, mit deren ätherischen Flageoletts es danach weitergeht, als wäre nichts gewesen. Der einzige Ausreißer auf der sonst sehr schlüssigen CD „Spheres“.

„Spheres“ dürfte ein Verkaufserfolg werden, weil das Album Heiterkeit ausstrahlt, die sanft vitalisierend wirkt und sich für alle Lebenslagen eignet. Und auch besonders für Menschen, die nachts absichtlich wachbleiben um Sterne zu beobachten oder Musik zu hören.

Rosemarie Frühauf

Heaven and Hell
, 14.02.2013

Toms Schmankerl der Woche

Vom Sphärenklang zum Untergang mit Tom Asam.

 

Der britische Violinist Daniel Hope ist gefeierter Solist und Kammermusiker und darüber hinaus für seine Vielseitigkeit bekannt. Da gibt es schon mal ein Crossover-Projekt mit Sting. Oder wie zuletzt in der Recomposed Serie der Deutschen Grammophon (bei der er seit 2007 exklusiv veröffentlicht) frisches Blut für Vivaldi durch Max Richters gelungene Re-Interpretation der Vier Jahreszeiten. Nun erscheint Spheres, eine musikalische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema Sphärenklänge. Spätestens seit Pythagoras beschäftigen sich Philosophen, Mathematiker und Musiker mit der Vorstellung, dass die Bewegung der Planeten einen Klang erzeugt, dass Musik eine mathematische Grundlage hat, eine Art astronomische Harmonie, die in allem stecke. Hope nimmt sich dieser so romantischen wie faszinierenden Idee an und spannt dabei einen musikalischen Bogen von der Renaissance bis in die Gegenwart, von Westhoff (dessen Einfluss auf Bach er für unterschätzt hält) über Fauré und Glass bis Arvo Pärt, Einaudi und Nyman. Hinzu kommen Ersteinspielungen von Stücken der Komponisten Alex Baranowksi, Gabriel Prokofieff, Alexej Igudesmann und Karsten Gundermann. Eine bezaubernde Idee, die von Hope u.a. mit Jaques Ammon (Piano), dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin und Mitgliedern des Rundfunkorchesters Berlin phantastisch umgesetzt wurde. Ideal, um öfter mal die Bildschirme ausgeschaltet zu lassen und zum Klang dieser Sphärenmusiken in den Nachthimmel zu glotzen. Mein persönlicher Favorit ist Arvo Pärts Fratres – ein Stück, bei dem die Ganzkörper-Gänsehaut in ihrer Heftigkeit im Wettstreit mit den Freudentränen liegt. Galaktisch.

Spheres – Daniel Hope
www.klassikerleben.de, 14.02.2013

Es ist eine Zusammenstellung von Miniaturen, aber auch etwas längeren Sätzen, die an stilistischer Bandbreite kaum zu überbieten ist. In seiner offenen und stets auf Unentdecktes neugierigen Art forscht der Geiger und künstlerische Leiter der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Daniel Hope, mit dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin unter Leitung von Simon Halsey und bei einigen Tracks sogar unterstützt vom Rundfunkchor Berlin in deutschem, italienischem, amerikanischem und russischem Repertoire nach wahren Pretiosen für sein Instrument. Viele Tracks stammen vom italienischen Filmmusikkomponisten Ludovico Einaudi. Dann werden Ausschnitte aus den berühmten, im John-Neumeier-Ballett „Preludes CV“ auch vertanzten 24 Präludien für Violine und Klavier der russisch-amerikanischen Komponistin Lera Auerbach mit Arrangements von barocken Bach-Präludien oder Genrestücken des Amerikaners Karl Jenkins kombiniert. Selbst Minimalistisches von Philipp Glass oder Michael Nyman findet sich in dieser aparten Sammlung von Violinwerken. Nicht vom großen Sergej, sondern vom jungen Gabriel Prokofjew stammt der Titel „Spheres“. Überhaupt stellen viele Werke ganz junger Komponisten auf Hopes jüngstem Album echte Überraschungen dar, so etwa das Stück „Biafra“ vom 1983 geborenen Alex Baranowski oder das Lento des 1973 geborenen Aleksey Igudesman. Eine Entdeckung ist auch der von John Rutter arrangierte „Cantique de Jean Racine“ op. 11 von Gabriel Fauré.
(Deutsche Grammophon/Universal Music)

(Helmut Peters)

 

Spheres
Bayern Klassik, www.br.de, 13.02.2013

Eine Auswahl sinneserweiternder, meditativer, melodiöser Musik wird auf der CD-Rückseite angekündigt. Eine Zeitreise vom Barock bis in die Gegenwart. Und eine Sternenreise: Die Musikzusammenstellung erklärt Daniel Hope mit seiner Faszination für den Nachthimmel, für die Weite des Universums.
Autor: Ben Alber Stand: 13.02.2013

 

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? – diese Frage verbinde die Musik auf seiner CD, so Hope im Booklet. Mit einer atmosphärisch dichten Bearbeitung einer Solo-Sonate des Barockkomponisten Johann Paul von Westhoff beginnt meine Sternenreise an der Seite von Daniel Hope. Ein erster Blick in den Nachthimmel, es glitzert silbrig, ich hebe langsam ab und freue mich auf den Flug. Dann “I giorni” von Ludovico Einaudi, ein Stück, das es vor nicht langer Zeit in die britischen Single-Charts brachte und in einige Werbespots – zum Beispiel in den eines indischen Telekommunikations-Anbieters.Und da passt es sicher auch gut. Die Botschaft auf “Spheres” vielleicht: “Ja, da draußen ist irgendetwas, ein ganzer Haufen Telekommunikationssatelliten!”

Konzeptalbum mit rotem Faden

Ich vertraue meinem Reiseleiter und bleibe an seiner Seite. Ich gebe zu, die Versuchung war groß, zur Erde zurückzukehren. Aber ich werde für meine Toleranz belohnt: Je länger die Reise dauert, desto mehr erschließt sich Hopes Idee, dem die Reihenfolge der Stücke auf der CD sehr wichtig ist. Nämlich die Idee eines geschlossenen Konzeptalbums, das inhaltlich und klanglich ein roter Faden durchzieht, und das doch auch immer wieder überrascht. Gerade mit zahlreichen Miniaturen jüngerer Komponisten: Max Richter, Alex Baranowski, und Gabriel Prokofiev, der Enkel von Sergeij Prokofiev, haben unter anderem Stücke geliefert, die überzeugen. Prokofiev ist es, der mit seinem “Spheres” am deutlichsten eine Projektionsfläche bietet für die Ängste, die auch Platz haben bei einer (Gedanken-)Reise ins Universum: Wenn da draußen etwas ist – ist es uns auch wohlgesonnen?

 

Ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel

Neben einem ganzen Reigen eingängiger Geigen-Melodien – mal im zarten Duo mit Klavier, mal in weichen Streicherklang gebettet, mal pompös orchestral und vokal aufgeladen – hat auch das unheimliche schwarze Nichts zwischen den glitzernden Sternen immer mal seinen Platz auf dieser CD. Und das ist gut so. Trotz Mars-Mobil und Raumstation bleibt das Universum doch ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel. Schade, wenn das in der Musik anders wäre.



2012


Album: Max Richter, Vivaldi: The Four Seasons, Recomposed By Max Richter (Deutsche Grammophon)
The Independent, 27.10.2012

For this latest entry in Deutsche Grammophon’s Recomposed series, Max Richter reworked the most-heard classical piece by discarding about 75% of the original source material, to leave a leaner, more modern work that’s like a neo-minimalist meditation on fragments of Vivaldi’s melodies. It’s a beautiful recomposition, with undulating string beds carrying Daniel Hope’s lyrical lone violin lines. The “Spring” sections are joyously simple and engaging, with subsequent sections adding depth through high-string harmonies, methodical harpsichord and pulsing string ostinatos that reflect the original Vivaldian style. The result is a creditable palimpsest of the original work informed by modern pop and dance techniques.

Max Richter spring-cleans Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons
The Guardian, 21.10.2012

Musician Max Richter has given The Four Seasons an avant-garde update. Then he had to find an orchestra who could play it. It starts with a shimmer of something strange and soft, an ambient mist of strings that’s both electronic and acoustic. Then something weird happens. Out of these shifting sonic tides comes an ensemble of violins – playing fragments of the world’s most overfamiliar concerto, the soundtrack to 1,000 adverts, an on-hold phone favourite that features on every classical compilation ever. Yes, it’s Vivaldi’s Four Seasons – but not as we know it.

This is Vivaldi Recomposed, by genre-hopping, new-music maestro Max Richter. So the big, clanging question is: why? Why retouch, rework, and reimagine Vivaldi’s evergreen pictorial masterpiece? “The Four Seasons is something we all carry around with us,” says Richter, a German-born British composer. “It’s just everywhere. In a way, we stop being able to hear it. So this project is about reclaiming this music for me personally, by getting inside it and rediscovering it for myself – and taking a new path through a well-known landscape.”

This involved “throwing molecules of the original Vivaldi into a test tube with a bunch of other things, and waiting for an explosion”. You can hear this chemical reaction particularly well at the opening of Richter’s reworked Summer concerto, which has become a weird collision of Arvo Pärt-likemelancholy in the solo violin and a minimalist workout for the rest of the strings. “There are times I depart completely from the original, yes, but there are moments when it pokes through. I was pleased to discover that Vivaldi’s music is very modular. It’s pattern music, in a way, so there’s a connection with the whole post-minimalist aesthetic I’m part of.”

Part of the fun of the album is that your ears play tricks with your memory of the original: these familiar melodies do unexpected things, resulting in an experience that’s both disturbing yet full of strange delights. And imagine how it felt for Recomposed’s solo violinist Daniel Hope: having played the original for decades, he – and more importantly his fingers – faced a surreal task when he first picked his way through Richter’s score.

“It was incredibly thought-provoking,” he says. “I had to deal with all the curveballs Max throws at you, the way he does things you don’t expect.” The experience clearly messed with Hope’s mind. “What really threw me was the first movement of Autumn. He pulls the rhythm around, starts dropping quavers here and there. You end up with a rickety and slightly one-legged Vivaldi. It’s incredibly funny. But even in poking fun at the original, there’s always enormous respect.”

The slow movement of Winter is another standout moment for Hope. “It’s really out of this world,” he says. “It’s as if an alien has picked it up and pulled it through a time warp. It’s really eerie: Max has kept Vivaldi’s melody, but it’s pulled apart by the ethereal harmonics underneath it.”

Can it all work beyond the recording studio? Audiences at the Barbican in London will find out later this month, when Vivaldi Recomposed is given its debut performance, with Hope backed by the Britten Sinfonia under the baton of André de Ridder. If the work sends listeners back to the original with new ears, that’s all part of the point, says Richter. “The original Four Seasons is a phenomenally innovative and creative piece of work. It’s so dynamic, so full of amazing images. And it feels very contemporary. It’s almost a kind of jump-cut aesthetic – all those extreme leaps between different kinds of material. Hats off to him. That’s what I’m really pleased with: my aim was to fall in love with the original again – and I have.”

Max Richter ‘recomposes’ Vivaldi’s Seasons – hear an excerpt!
Gramophone, 12.09.2012

British composer Max Richter is the latest artist to join Deutsche Grammophon’s ‘Recomposed’ series, which invites contemporary artists to re-work an original piece of music, making it accessible to a wider audience. Rather than re-working a recording from the DG catalogue as has been the tactic of previous participants, Richter has chosen to ‘recompose’ Vivaldi’s original score for The Four Seasons. The end result is an amalgamation of Richter’s new composition and Vivaldi’s familiar work in a fresh piece of music.

‘The Four Seasons is an omnipresent piece of music and like no other part of our musical landscape. I hear it in the supermarket regularly, am confronted with it in adverts or hear it as muzak when on hold,’ said Richter. The challenge was to ‘create a new score, an experimental hybrid, that constantly references “Vivaldi” but also “Richter” and that is current but simultaneously preserves the original spirit of this great work. In my notes you will find parts that consist of 90 per cent of my own material; but on the other hand you will find moments where I have only altered a couple of notes in Vivaldi’s original score and shortened, prolonged or shifted some of the beats. I literally wrote myself into Vivaldi’s score.’

Richter is becoming increasingly well known as a composer for cinema – he scored the acclaimed documentary Waltz with Bashir and his music was featured in Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island and Ridley Scott’s Prometheus. He also collaborates with orchestras and ensembles, and creates music for dance theatre and installations.

Featured on the Vivaldi album are British violinist Daniel Hope, German conductor André de Ridder and Berlin’s Konzerthaus Chamber Orchestra. Recomposed is released in the UK on October 29, 2012 – click here for details. The UK premiere takes place at the Barbican on October 31.

A violinist sets out to cleanse Berlin of its past
www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc, 15.08.2012

Daniel Hope, the international soloist, has issues with the city of Berlin. It kicked out his family in the 1930s and expropriated their villa for the use of the war criminals Albert Speer and Joachim von Ribbentrop. Daniel performs often in Berlin. In a piece written exclusively for Slipped Disc, he explains how he is trying to come to terms with the city and its past.

My family’s villa

by Daniel Hope

In June 2012 I performed the “War Concerto” at the Konzerthaus in Berlin, a work I commissioned from Bechara El-Khoury. This piece, composed on a grand scale for violin and large orchestra, is the Lebanese composer’s statement against the destruction and futility of war. El-Khoury has translated his own recollections of the bloody civil conflict which desolated Lebanon in the seventies, into a kind of lament. He dedicated the Concerto to me and, to my surprise, decided to add his musical take on the feeling of being uprooted, as experienced by the Berlin-branch of my own family.

 

(The Valentin family, 1925. Daniel’s grandmother is 3rd from left)

Berlin and me – a story filled with ghosts and fascination. It all started in London, when, as a young boy, our German grandmother would recount stories of “her” Berlin, the Berlin of the Weimar Republic. Of her villa in Berlin-Dahlem, cycling tours around the Wannsee, picnics with the Kaiser’s family or her brother’s confirmation party. This was one of her favourite stories: how the plump Maybachs rolled slowly up the gravel driveway, passing the Spanish fountain. How the guests alighted, chatting happily as they made their way ceremoniously along the terrace and into the house, via the French doors. Then the final directives to the staff, all so celebratory. Speeches to begin, not too punctilious, but nonetheless, imperative. And only then was the banquet to be served: Terrine of Trout, Fillet of Veal and, for dessert,  Chocolate Praline cake. Served with a chilled Zeltinger Schlossberg, 1917 vintage.

One day, long after she had passed away, I found myself standing in front of her villa in Dahlem. The terrace was still there, as was the neatly kept lawn, just as she had once described it to me. I could envisage my great grandfather, Wilhelm Valentin, sitting in his favourite deckchair, puffing on a cigar and relishing the view into his rose-garden. I decided to take a snapshot of the house, to capture the moment. Suddenly, one of the windows opened. An elderly lady appeared. Before I could even flash her a friendly smile, she starting shouting in strident Berlin tones : “What are you doing here? This is private property. Get lost!”

I tried to reassure her that I was only taking a photo of my great-grandmother’s house.

 

“Great-grandmother?”, the old woman barked. “You mean the Valentin family?”, she continued, her tone still hostile.

“Yes”, I replied, more than a little surprised. “This house belonged to my family”. My unconscious emphasis on the word “belonged” dispelled any hope that she might become a little friendlier. At least, I thought,  she might be able to answer some of the many questions that were racing through my head. I was stunned that she even knew the family name, after all, it had been seventy years.

“Did you know my family?” I dared to ask.

There was a moment of silence, which didn’t seem all that reassuring.

“No,” she spat back at me, now almost screaming. “But I know the history of this house!”

With that she slammed the window shut and disappeared.

 

The “history”, as the angry woman in the window put it, was the part that our grandma left out of our bedtime stories: The confiscation of the villa, personally appropriated by both Albert Speer and Joachim von Ribbentrop, who were initially interested in ‘acquiring’ it for their own use. After my family fled Germany in 1936, the house became a temporary refuge for the Jüdische Waldschule (Jewish Forest School) under Lotte Kaliski. Up to 320 children studied there until its closure in 1939.

One of the pupils was film director Mike Nichols, another Michael Blumenthal, who survived the holocaust and later served as Secretary of the US Treasury under Jimmy Carter; he is currently the director of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. It seems hard to comprehend how these things could have happened as they did, but after the Jewish school was closed down, von Ribbentrop, the Foreign Minister of the “Third Reich”, installed the Nazi’s main decoding station in the villa, which became a sort of German Bletchley Park, building antennas and constructing new bomb-proof buildings on the estate  for “Sonderaufgaben” (special tasks).

According to Nazi reports, telegrams from foreign embassies were intercepted, deciphered and delivered promptly to the Führer. This new department, which employed 300 workers in my great grandparent’s former house, was named “Pers Z”. At its peak, it solved the codes of 34 nations, including personal messages between Stalin and Roosevelt, but also some 15,000 French cryptograms up to the defeat of France in 1940. Hitler once visited the house and later planned to  hide in a bunker there. There is a series of secret tunnels constructed under the building as both supply and escape routes. The house is today still owned by the German Foreign Ministry.

Since I uncovered this extraordinary story by a chance and a rather unpleasant encounter, I have started to unearth further family connections on almost every visit to Berlin. Such as the family vault at the Luisen-cemetery in Grünewald, the remnants of  the  yard of my great grandfather’s factory at Großbeerenstrasse 71 in Kreuzberg, or the St. Annen church in Dahlem, where my great aunt conspired with Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Martin Niemöller against government-sponsored efforts to nazify the German Protestant church.

(Daniel’s grandmother)

But what fascinates me most about Berlin, is its perpetual history still hidden deep inside so many of its buildings. And so I decided some years ago to fill these places with music, one after the other, by performing at the Reichstag, the Ministry of Finance (formerly Göring’s Ministry of Aviation), the Felix Mendelssohn-Remise, (the former carriage house of the old Berlin headquarters of the Mendelssohn Bank) and Tempelhof Airport. Making music in these buildings, surrounded by the ghosts of times gone by, let me into a past which I did not experience, but can still sense.  I was lucky enough, in an appearance before the German parliament at the Reichstag, to dedicate my performance of Ravel’s “Kaddish” to both of my Berlin great-grandfathers, and felt more than ever that, in Berlin, music and history go together hand in hand. Just as they do in the “War Concerto”, a piece which has now become even more personal.

Verfemte Musik mit Daniel Hope
OZ, 09.06.2012

Der Stargeiger spricht mit Schülern der Montessorischule über seine Kompositionen. Die Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern bieten hochkarätige Konzerte.

Artikel lesen…

Greifswald – Intendant Matthias von Hülsen (69) kann es kaum erwarten: Das erste Greifswald-Konzert der Festspiele Mecklenburg- Vorpommernbestreitet in dieser Saison Daniel Hope (37). Der Stargeiger und zugleich Künstlerische Leiter der Festspiele bringt beim „Carnegie-Hall-Projekt“ mit Musikern der New Yorker Academy sowie dem Concertino EnsembleRostock imDomSt. Nikolai verfemteMusikzu Gehör. Kompositionen, die von den Nationalsozialisten im Dritten Reich verboten wurden.

„DasKonzert findet unter der Leitung von Jeffrey Kahane statt. Einer der bedeutendsten amerikanischen Musikerpersönlichkeiten, der auch als Solist zu hören sein wird“, frohlockt Matthias von Hülsen. Passionierten Festspielbesuchern sind derlei Verbindungen nicht fremd: Bereits zum dritten Mal lockt das Festival den Nachwuchs des Carnegie- Hall’s Ensembles an die Ostsee.

Gänzlich neu hingegen ist ihr programmatischer Ansatz. Denn bei den Werken von Pavel Haas,Gideon KleinundErwin Schulhoff „handelte es sichumunglaublich begabte, fantastische Komponisten, die deportiert und ermordet wurden“, erklärt Volker Ahmels (50) vom Zentrum für Verfemte Musik an der Hochschule für Musik Rostock. Er muss es wissen. Seit 15 Jahren beschäftigt sich der Pianist sowie Hochschullehrer mit diesem Thema und fand in Daniel Hope einen Partner,dener für die verfemteMusik nicht erst begeistern musste. Dem Briten ist sie nicht zuletzt aufgrund der eigenen Familiengeschichte eine Herzenssache.

Auch deshalb nimmt er sich die Zeit, mit Greifswalder Kindern über diese Komponisten und ihre Zeit ins Gespräch zu kommen. Unmittelbar vor dem Konzert am 15. Juni besucht Daniel Hope mit Volker Ahmels die Montessorischule. Besser noch: „Innerhalb des Projekts ,Rhapsody in School’ wird auch die ZeitzeuginundMusikwissenschaftlerin Eva Herrmannová mitden Kindern ins Gesprächkommen“, sagt Ahmels und fügt hinzu: „Sie ist eine ganz außergewöhnliche Persönlichkeit und wird als Überlebende von Theresienstadt über den Holocaust berichten.“

Die Klasse 6 der Montessorischule hat sich gerade intensiv mit dem Buch „Damalswares Friedrich“ beschäftigt. Ein Jugendbuch, das den Nationalsozialismus thematisiert. „Der Besuch des Jüdischen Museums in Berlin war Teil der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Schicksal derHauptfigur“, berichtet Schulleiter Nils Kleemann. Und auch Musik ist den Schülern nicht fremd. „Durch die Montessori- Musikschule habenviele einen intensiven Zugang zum Musizieren und Singen“, so Kleemann. Der Besuch von Daniel Hope , Eva Herrmannová und Volker Ahmels sei deshalb sehr willkommen.

Matthias von Hülsen hört das gern. Ihmist es enorm wichtig, dass Kindern die Geschichte und speziell dieses Thema nahegebracht wird. „Deshalb laden wir auch insbesondere neben den Erwachsenen alle Greifswalder Schüler ganz herzlich dazu ein, das Konzert im Domzu einemSonderpreis zu besuchen“, betont der Intendant. Möglich wurde es übrigens nur durch die finanzielle Unterstützung der Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Stiftung.

Doch die drei Monate andauernden Festspiele in MV haben für Greifswald durchaus noch mehr zu bieten. Jan Vogler, einer der wichtigsten deutschen Cellisten, interpretiert Ende Juli an zwei Abenden in der Aula der Universität die Bach-Suiten für Violoncello. Sie gelten für Musiker als der heilige Gral: Sowohl harmonisch als auch technisch bringen sie Cellisten an ihre Grenzen, weshalb ihnen nur die ganz Großen ihres Fachs gewachsen seien.

Das letzte Greifswalder Festspielkonzert der Saison ist für die Stadthalle geplant. Ende August werden hier unter Leitung des Polen Wojciech Rajski internationale Meisterkurs-Studenten auftreten.

Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern: Daniel Hope über seine Amerika-Projekte
Ausschnitt aus Zeitungsbeilage, die in einer Auflage von ca. 1 Mio in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Hamburg, Berlin, Niedersachsen und Schleswig-Holstein erschienen ist, 20.05.2012

Daniel Hope über seine Amerika-Projekte

PDF Dokument

Als Musiker bin ich in der ganzen Welt unterwegs. Doch als Künstlerischer Direktor der Festspiele MV freue ich mich über jeden Tag, den ich im Sommer in diesem wunderschönen Land verbringen darf. Und das geht inzwischen auch vielen Musikern aus New York so:
Zum dritten Mal kommt mit dem „Carnegie-Hall-Projekt“ der Spitzennachwuchs von New Yorks führenden Musikeinrichtungen nach Heiligendamm
(13.06.) und Schwerin (14.06.). Besonders am Herzen liegt mir das Konzert im Greifswalder Dom (15.06.), wo ich mit dem Concertino Ensemble Rostock und dem wunderbaren Dirigenten Jeffrey Kahane von den Nationalsozialisten „Verfemte Musik“ von Schulhoff, Haas und Klein spielen werde. Dieses Thema ist historisch wie musikalisch von großer Bedeutung, die diese Werke hör- und spürbar machen.
Für das „Carnegie-Hall-Projekt“ und auch das „Lincoln- Center-Projekt“ proben und wohnen die Musiker dank der Unterstützung des Grand Hotel Heiligendamm in dem malerischen Ostseebad. Für Wu Han und David Finckel, die Direktoren der Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, ist es ebenfalls das dritte Jahr in MV. 2011 hatte ihnen unser damaliger Preisträger in Residence, der Cellist Li-Wei Qin, so gut gefallen, dass sie ihn neben anderen Spitzenmusikern für die Konzerte in Heiligendamm, Bützow, Schönberg und Samow (29.08.–02.09.) gleich wieder eingeladen haben.
Beim Savannah Music Festival in Georgia, wo ich ebenfalls Künstlerischer Direktor bin, sind bereits viele Festspielpreisträger aufgetreten. Daher bringe ich diesen Sommer zum „Savannah-Projekt“ nun erstmalig Musiker des Festivals mit: Mit Philip Dukes, Josephine Knight, Sebastian Knauer u. a. proben wir im Jagdschloss Kotelow in Vorpommern. Konzerte spielen wir in Rühn (08.08), Bad Doberan (09.08.) und Kotelow (10.08.), wo auch ein Werk der Mecklenburgischen Komponistin Emilie Mayer zu hören sein wird, deren 200. Geburtstag wir bei den Festspielen MV feiern. So verbindet sich einmal mehr, was unserer Meinung nach musikalisch zusammengehört: Amerika und Mecklenburg-Vorpommern!

Daniel Hope

PDF Dokument

 



2011


Der reisende Direktor
Stuttgarter Zeitung, 19.11.2011

Er ist ein Tausendsassa: Daniel Hope ist Geiger, Buchautor und verantwortet zudem den künstlerischen Bereich bei den Festspielen Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

PDF – Dokument

Violinist Daniel Hope makes Aspen Music Fest debut
The Aspen Times, CO Colorado, 15.07.2011

Musical tradition comes naturally for Hope

Daniel Hope did not come from a musical family. In fact, when the celebrated violinist and conductor Yehudi Menuhin asked Hope’s mother if she could tell the difference between Bach and Beethoven, her response was, “Yeah, I think so.”

Menuhin wasn’t idly quizzing the woman on her knowledge of classical music; this was a job interview. She gave the answer with enough confidence that she got the job, as Menuhin’s secretary. “And before we could blink, we were thrust into the world of music,” Daniel Hope said.

Out of that world of music, Hope has created another world of music, a mini-empire that spans continents and books, festivals and collaborations. Hope makes his debut at the Aspen Music Festival Friday, in a concert with the Aspen Chamber Symphony and conductor Robert Spano, the festival’s music director-designate. Hope, a 37-year-old violinist, will be featured in two pieces: Ravel’s “Tzigane,” and the American premiere of “Unfinished Journey,” a 2009 piece for violin and strings that Hope commissioned from Lebanese composer Bechara El Khoury, to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Menuhin’s death.

Hope moves over to the Harris Hall on Tuesday, July 19, for “A Baroque Evening with Daniel Hope,” a concert featuring works by the best-known figures of the Baroque period — Bach, Vivaldi, Telemann — and also spotlights the work of Westhoff, a largely forgotten composer who, according to Hope, was considered superior to his colleague Bach early in their careers. “He was one of the great violinists of his day. And a great discovery for me,” said Hope, who featured Westhoff on his 2009 album “Air: A Baroque Journey.”

It is a bit of a wonder that Hope is in Aspen at all. While he is in Colorado, the Mecklenburg Festival, which Hope serves as music director, carries on without him. Hope, however, already did his bit in Mecklenburg this summer, premiering El Khoury’s War Concerto last month. And there will be time for Hope to return to his festival this summer; Mecklenburg, the third largest festival in Germany, spans three months, 80 venues and 125 performances. Under Hope, who took over in Mecklenburg last year, the festival began a young musicians exchange program with Carnegie Hall and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center.

Hope is also the associate artistic director of the Savannah Music Festival, in Georgia, an early-spring gathering that covers jazz, country, bluegrass, gospel, Portuguese fado, and Indian styles, as well as classical.

And there are the projects. Over the last 15 years, Hope has been researching composers murdered by the Nazis; the interest has been manifested in a 2008 concert at the Berlin airport to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht, and a series of events with mezzo soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, including a concert tour and the 2007 recording, “Terezin.” Hope’s latest recording, “The Romantic Violinist,” is designed to cast a light on Joseph Joachim, a 19th century musician whom Hope says was instrumental in the creation of violin concerto repertoire.

Hope is also an author, with three books to his credit. The first was a family history, tracing how the Nazis took over his ancestral villa, in Berlin, and made it into a center for Nazi cryptology. The second, “When Do I Applaud?” is a guide to concertgoing etiquette and customs. “Toi Toi Toi,” which translates as “good luck,” catalogues classical music catastrophes, from onstage deaths to the story that Sting, a friend of Hope’s, told him, about a vocalist who collapsed on the Royal Albert Hall stage during the Proms concerts, and was promptly replaced by a member of the audience.

Hope has his own music tragedy to tell. As a 7-year-old in his first performance, at London’s South Bank Center, with his teacher and several other young players, Hope leaned back against a swinging door and disappeared, to the laughter of the audience.

“I came back in, more laughter. I was incredibly embarrassed — and hadn’t even played a note yet. My career was over before it began,” he recalled. Hope adds that the experience has had a happy ending: “I realized, it’s not about the mishap, but about how you recover, how you make it not a disaster. Whenever I get nervous, I think about that moment and it relaxes me.”

Hope’s entry into the music realm was less of a mixed experience. After Menuhin hired his mother, Hope practically became a fixture at the Menuhin house.

“I was soaking up the music — not only Menuhin, but Stéphane Grappelli, Ravi Shankar, people who came on a daily basis. I remember pulling the spike out from Rostropovich’s cello,” he said. “It wasn’t even a question of wanting to become a musician; music was implanted in my brain.”

One issue loomed over his career — a potential conflict of interest with his mother’s employer. Menuhin intentionally kept his distance from the young Hope, until, when Hope was 16, he heard Hope play — and immediately brought him on a concert tour, with Menuhin conducting and Hope as soloist.

“It was the best possible way of learning those pieces,” Hope, who toured with Menuhin for 10 years and performed at the conductor’s final concert, said. “It’s one thing learning them with your teacher; it’s another to play them in concert for an audience with someone who knows those pieces better than anyone in the world.
stewart@aspentimes.com

The Romantic Violinist – A Celebration of Joseph Joachim
International Record Review, 20.05.2011

Brahms Hungarian Dances, WoO” – No.1 in G minor; No.5 in G minor (both arr. Marc-Olivier Dupin). Scherzo in C minor, Wo02. Geistliches Wiegenlied, Op. 91 No. 2. Bruch Violin Concerto No.1 in G minor, Op. 26. Dvorak Humoresque in G flat, B187 No.7 (arr. Franz Waxman). Joachim Romanze, Op. 2 No.1. Notturno, Op. 12. Schubert Auf dem Wasser zu singen, D774 (transcr. Hope). C. Schumann Romanze, Op. 22 No. 1.

Daniel Hope (violin/Cviola); with Anne-Sofie von Otter (mezzo); Sebastian Knauer, Bengt Forsberg (pianos); Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra/Sakari Oramo.

DG 477 9301 (full price, 1 hour 6 minutes). German texts and English/French translations included.

Website www.deutschegrammophon.com

Producer John West Engineers Mike Hatch, Dave Rowell. Date August 2010.

 

When I glanced at the track listing for this release, entitled ‘The Romantic Violinist – A celebration of Joseph Joachim’, my spontaneous reaction was one of instant disappointment. Any violinist keen to proselytize Joachim’s cause on disc could find enough music (much of it un-recorded) by this hugely influential figure to fill several CDs, whereas Daniel Hope’s latest offering for the yellow label opens with yet another recording of that mercilessly over-recorded violin concerto, Max Bruch’s First in G minor, Op. 26. Where was Joachim’s own splendid Violin Concerto in Hungarian Style, Op. 11 (written in 1853 and probably his finest work), or the affecting and idiomatic E minor Variations for violin and orchestra, dedicated to Sarasate?

Ironically, Joachim’s most frequently recorded compositions are his indispensable cadenzas for the Beethoven and Brahms concertos. Collectors seeking a more representative introduction to his output as a composer will find Elmar Oliveira’s version of the Hungarian Concerto, coupled with two fine orchestral works, the Hamlet, Op. 4 and Henry IV, Op. 7 Overtures, well worth seeking out. (It was released in 1991 on Pickwick IMP Masters MCD27 and subsequently reissued on Carlton Classics 6702092.)

Why, then, does Hope give us yet another Bruch G minor, albeit one which proves to be far from superfluous? History relates that Bruch’s original 1886 score was completely overhauled by Joachim, who premiered the revised (and now mandatory) version in Bremen in 1868. Still, whether or not that fact is in itself sufficient to warrant its inclusion here is open to debate. What is certain, however, is that the present account is superlative in every regard – so fine, in fact, that I’m inclined to overlook the omission of Joachim’s Hungarian Concerto, which no doubt he’d play equally well! This performance overflows with incident and rich musical detailing and, like James Ehnes’s live BBC TV performance with Gianandrea Noseda and the BBCPhilharmonic at the 2010 Proms, which many readers will doubtless recall with pleasure, it serves as a telling reminder of how able an orchestrator Bruch actually was. If Hope breathes new life into this ubiquitous war-horse, no less impressive is

the contribution of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo, who, as a fiddler himself, knows this piece inside out.

Oramo deliberately stresses the violas’ tremolando entry at 1’35” in the opening movement (a detail lost to the ear in many recordings) and Hope’s unexpected yet tremendously effective finger-substitution at l’ 54″ made me gasp with surprise upon first hearing. The horn crescendo at 2’05” often goes unobserved, too, and the lovely counter theme for first oboe (3’15”) during the lyrical second episode is beautifully managed here. Oramo ushers in the noble second subject of the AdagiO (Richard Strauss must have had this theme in mind when he wrote his Alpensirifonie) with dignified understatement, and the cellos’ counter melody supporting the solo line at 2’48” comes across as the composer might have wished. The finale dazzles, rounding out a captivating and insightful reading that probably deserves to be here after all!

Oramo and the Stockholmers join Hope again in Marc-Olivier Dupin’s orchestrations of two Hungarian Dances by Brahms, originally transcribed for violin and piano by Joachim himself, in which form purists inight well have preferred them here. Yet these arrangements return to the spirit if not the letter of Joachim’s own versions; both are tremendously well played and it would be hard to imagine anybody failing to respond to their visceral energy and momentum. By contrast, the Waxman arrangement of the familiar Dvorak Humoresque has an old- world charm which left me wondering if Hope had ever seen the heavily stylized 1926 film footage of Mischa Elman playing the piece with piano accompaniment.

Joachim’s Op. 12 Notturno in A for violin and orchestra (1858) is at once substantial and original and receives a glowing performance. Joachim introduced the young Brahms to the Schumanns in 1853, ‘and it’s good to find the inclusion of Clara’s Romanze, Op, 22 No.1, a work they often performed together. The so-called ‘F-A-E Sonata’ takes its name from Joachim’s personal motto Jrei aber einsam (‘free but solitary’) and was written for him in the same year by Robert Schumann, Albert Dietrich and Brahms, whose C minor Scherzo is arrestingly realized by Hope and pianist Sebastian Knauer. It’s also a pleasure to hear Anne-Sofie von Otter in one of Brahms’s songs with obbligato viola.

Finally, it’s worth noting that Joachim, who survived into the recording era, can be heard on several historical reissues from Pearl, Opal Recordings and Testament. Nevertheless, as one listens to him now it’s hard to reconcile his slow, wideamplitude vibrato, frequent use of portamentos and often wayward intonation with the towering musical figure to whom Daniel Hope pays affectionate tribute in this release. This is an exceptionally fine issue, repertoire concerns notwithstanding.

Michael Jameson

THE ROMANTIC VIOLINIST
BBC Music Magazine, 15.05.2011

Bruch: Violin Concerto in G minor;
plus works by Brahms, Dvorak,
Joachim, Schubert & C Schumann

Daniel Hope (violin, viola). Sebastian
Knauer, Bengt Forsberg (piano). Anne- Sofie von Otter (mezzo-soprano); Royal
Stockholm PO/Sakari Oramo
DG4779301 66:15 mins
BBC Music Direct £12.99

The centrepiece of Daniel Hope’s affectionate tribute to the great Hungarian-born violinist Joseph Joachim, Bruch’s G minor Concerto, receives a warmly committed account from the soloist and the hugely responsive Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo. As in his recording of the Mendelssohn, Hope never takes this over-familiar score for granted and has imaginative things to say at every juncture. Some may feel the violin cadenzas at the opening are a bit too self-consciously elongated. Also the recording places Hope rather close to the microphone, making the double stop passage work in the first movement and finale sound unnecessarily aggressive.

The rest of the programme presents an attractive sequence of shorter pieces, including the only available recording ofJoachim’s Notturno for violin and orchestra. Although hardly a major discovery, the inventive orchestral fabric excluding violins gives the work a distinctly autumnal hue. I was somewhat less convinced by the rather rough and ready string orchestral transcriptions of Brahms’s First and Fifth Hungarian Dances. Also why didn’t Hope give us all three of Clara Schumann’s Romances; and why omit the first of Brahms’s glorious Op. 91 songs? The final item, Dvorak’s ubiquitous Humoresque as arranged Hollywood-style by Franz Waxman, seems idiomatically out of place here, though Hope’s performance is certainly seductive.

Erik Levi

PERFORMANCE ****
RECORDING ****

Romantic Violinist ****
Classic Fm, 14.05.2011

Music bV Bruch, Joachim, Dvorak, Brahms, Schumann & Schubert
Daniel Hope (vln), Various artists
Orchestral: DG 477 9301

The Music Joseph Joachim, the binding force uniting the various pieces in this fine selection, was one of the greatest violinists of the 19th century, a gifted composer in his own right and a consulted expert who advised some of the greatest composers ofthe age.

The Performances The major offering here is Bruch’s evergreen First Violin Concerto, which Daniel Hope plays with cliche-free, heartfelt intensity. He radiates espressivo allure in Joachim’s own Romanza and Nottumo, captures the simmering passion of two Joachim arrangements of Brahms’s Hungarian Dances, and the heart-warming whimsy of Dvorak’s beloved Humoresque. Anne Sofie von Otter makes a welcome guest appearance in Brahms’s adorable Geistliches Wiegenlied, which also gives Hope a chance to display his considerable skills as a viola player.

The Verdict The Joachim connection is fascinating, and Hope plays each piece as a musical gem in its own right, although experienced straight through this feels slightly disjointed. For a more cohesive musical experience try Hope’s stunning Air: A Baroque Journey (DG 477 8094).

JULIAN HAtLOCK

musikalisch anrührend schön, setzt auf Empathie und Emphase
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 09.04.2011

“………wie schnell sich einem das Herz erwärmt, wenn man einen Geigenton hört, der kehlig und vibratoreich unseren eingeübten Vorstellungen von romantischer Innigkeit entspricht, merkt man mit dem ersten Einsatz von Daniel Hope im g-Moll-Violinkonzert von Max Bruch. “The Romantic Violinist – A Celebration of Joseph Joachim” heißt dieses Album(…….) – dieser Ton bohrt sich mit einer verschwenderischen Schwärmerei ins Ohr, wie man das seit Fritz Kreisler und Jascha Heifetz gerne zu haben gelernt hat….

…diese leicht sentimental getönte CD ist musikalisch anrührend schön. Sie setzt auf Empathie und Emphase……….Das Notturno für Violine und Orchester op. 12 ist ein echter Schatz. Sakari Oramo, der das Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra leitet, bestätigt in dieser Aufnahme erneut seinen Ruf, gegenwärtig zu den sensibelsten Begleitern unter den Dirigenten zu gehören.”

Text: F.A.Z., 09.04.2011, Nr. 84 / Seite 37

Hommage an Joseph Joachim
Rondo II/2011, 01.04.2011

Daniel Hope – The Romantic Violinist
The Times, 26.03.2011

The Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim may have died in 1907, but he’s a few clicks away on YouTube and lives again in Daniel Hope’s diverting celebration of the musician’s romantic art with Sakari Oramo and the Stockholm Philharmonic.

Hope’s way with the Bruch: Violin Concerto No 1 is lively, burning with gypsy passion. Temperatures calm down for Joachim’s own Romanze and his equally endearing Notturno. Joachim’s friend Brahms pops up; so does mezzo Anne Sofie von Otter.

Geoff Brown
(Deutsche Grammophon; out now)

The Romantic Violinist: A Celebration of Joseph Joachim
The National, 23.03.2011

Daniel Hope (violin, viola), Sakari Oramo (cond), Anne Sofie von Otter (mezzo-soprano), Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra
(Deutsche Grammophon)

While we know composers of the past through their written works, it is hard to conjure up the worlds of great performers such as Niccolò Paganini or Ignaz Moscheles simply because there is nothing to prove their brilliance other than the anecdote and adulation of their contemporaries.

In Joseph Joachim’s case, we do have a few crackling recordings from the turn of the 20th century, by which time he was elderly and probably past his best. Yet this was a violinist who not only composed his own works but was also a huge influence on some of the greatest composers of the mid- and late-19th century, including Clara and Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms and Max Bruch.

Indeed, such an important figure was he that he was given free reign to amend and adapt the Bruch violin concerto that opens the album, No. 1 in G minor, to the extent that Bruch himself feared that listeners would believe the piece to have been composed by Joachim.

The young South African/British violinist Daniel Hope, fascinated by Joachim’s immense presence in the history of German Romanticism, has tried to bring together those works that reflect his influence the most – the Bruch, two Hungarian Dances by Brahms that Joachim regularly performed with the composer himself, and a Schubert Lied that had been performed by Joachim’s wife, the mezzo-soprano Amalie Schneeweiss (performed here by Anne Sofie von Otter).

Hope even taught himself the viola especially to play Brahms’s Geistliches Wiegenlied, which had been reworked from a lullaby to celebrate the birth of Joachim’s first child. The addition of a Romanza and a Notturne written by Joachim himself reveal the violinist as a tender, sensitive composer. Luckily, Hope’s performances are just as tender, with none of the histrionics that sometimes accompany the Romantic canon, making this a genuinely interesting collection.

From Abu Dhabi

Daniel Hope und “The romantic violinist”
www.ndr.de/kultur/klassik, 22.03.2011

“The romantic violinist”
Daniel Hope, Violine und Viola
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, Ltg.: Sakari Oramo
Sebastian Knauer, Klavier
Anne-Sofie von Otter, Mezzosopran, Bengt Forsberg, Klavier

Gerade hat Daniel Hope sein Buch “Toi toi toi – Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik” bei uns auf NDR Kultur vorgestellt, da kommt eine neue CD des Geigers heraus – “A Celebration of Joseph Joachim”. Nach Ausflügen in die Welt des Barock stellt uns Daniel Hope jetzt den “romantischen Geiger” Joseph Joachim vor, es ist eine “Hommage an einen weitgehend vergessenen musikalischen Giganten”, so Hope. Eine Hommage an den Geiger, der mit Schumann und Brahms befreundet war, der in Hannover wirkte und auch selbst komponiert hat.

“Hommage für einen vergessenen musikalischen Giganten”

Das berühmte Violinkonzert von Max Bruch haben schon viele vor ihm gespielt – Daniel Hope stellt das Werk aber in einen inhaltlichen Zusammenhang, und so lässt man sich auch Altbekanntes gern gefallen. Den einen oder anderen mag es erstaunen, dass Hope für sein Porträt keines der von Joachim komponierten Violinkonzerte ausgewählt hat, auch keines der großen Violinkonzerte, die ihm gewidmet sind, aber Hope sagt es selbst – es gibt genug Material für 20 CDs.

Daniel Hope und das Königliche Philharmonische Orchester Stockholm

Bruch hat sein Violinkonzert nicht Joachim gewidmet, nahm aber für eine spätere Fassung die Anregungen des Geigers auf. Die Interpretation von Daniel Hope zusammen mit dem Königlichen Philharmonischen Orchester Stockholm und Sakari Oramo ist großartig – mit allem Herzblut und Risiko gespielt, phantasievoll, Solist und Orchester wunderbar harmonierend.

Von dem Komponisten Joachim hat Daniel Hope zwei kleinere Werke ausgewählt – eine Romanze und ein Notturno. Dazwischen setzt Hope Ungarische Tänze und das Scherzo von Brahms, und tut zumindest dem Komponisten Joseph Joachim damit keinen Gefallen. Denn dem direkten Vergleich zu Brahms, zu Schubert, zu Dvorak können Joachims Werke nicht standhalten. Dafür sind aber dessen Bearbeitungen der berühmtesten Ungarischen Tänze seines Freundes Johannes Brahms für Geige und Orchester sehr unterhaltsam.

Daniel Hope erzählt anregende Geschichten

Dass man auch als Solist mit einem ganzen Sinfonieorchester Kammermusik machen kann, führen Daniel Hope und das Königliche Philharmonische Orchester Stockholm mit Sakari Oramo nicht nur in Bruchs Violinkonzert vor

Diese CD macht Spaß, da ist ein fabelhaft gespieltes Bruch-Violinkonzert, da ist das schöne Nebeneinander von Konzertantem und Kammermusik, und wir bekommen einen Eindruck davon, dass große Musiker im 19. Jahrhundert nie nur Interpreten waren. Der an dem legendären Yehudi Menuhin geschulte Daniel Hope erzählt anregende Geschichten – man hört ihm gern zu.

Vorgestellt von Raliza Nikolov

Daniel Hope: The Romantic Violonist
Codex Flores - Onlinemagazin für alle Bereiche der klassischen Musik , 18.03.2011

Orchesterwerke, Kammermusikwerke, Lieder auf einer CD – das ist zumindest ungewöhnlich, auch wenn Konzept-Alben heute en vogue sind (man denke etwa an die aktuelle Scherbe Resonances der Pianistin Hélène Grimaud). Der Geiger Daniel Hope brennt Werke von Bruch, Clara Schumann, Brahms, Joseph Joachim, Schubert und Dvořák ins Polycarbonat, wir fühlen uns also durchweg romantisch. Wir lösen auf: Das Ganze ist ein Tribut an den Geiger Joseph Joachim, der in seiner Bedeutung für die Epoche unterschätzt werde – meint Hope – als Solist, der Werken wie Beethovens und Brahms’ Violinkonzert zum Durchbruch verhalf, als künstlerischer Berater, der etwa den Solopart des Violinkonzertes von Max Bruch mitgeschrieben hat, aber auch selber als Komponist und als Inspirationsquelle zahlreicher Schlüsselwerke der Epoche.

Gegenüber diesem Hans-Dampf-in-allen-Gassen mit ungarischen Wurzeln und wenig Berührungsängsten, wenn’s um den geschmacklich sicheren Herzschmerz geht, haben auch die Interpreten dieser CD keine Scheu. Das Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra steht unter der Leitung Sakari Oramos Hope in nichts nach, geht es darum, Romantisches auch romantisch klingen zu lassen, glutvoll und beseelt. Den Solisten, der nicht den glatten, feinen und präzisen Klang sucht, sondern auch das Rohe kochen lässt, ist es in der interpretatorischen Disziplin in Sachen Dynamik und Phrasierung noch einen Tick voraus; es gibt ihm damit genau den Halt, den er braucht, um sich frei spielen zu können.

Zwei Ungarische Tänze von Brahms, die Nrn. 1 und 5 werden hier in der Orchestrierung von Marc-Olivier Dupin nicht abstrakt oder erhöht, sie massieren die waschechte Csárdas-Seele. Für das Geistliche Wiegenlied op. 91, Nr. 2 von Brahms greift Hope zur Viola, und zu ihm gesellt sich die Mezzosopranistin Sofie von Otter. Man versteht zwar kaum, was sie singt, zu Herzen geht das Kleinod aber auch so. Schuberts Lied «Auf dem Wasser zu singen» D 774 hat Hope für die CD selber für Klavier und Violine eingerichtet.

Abgeschlossen wir der Reigen seliger Geister von Dvořáks Kuschelklassik-Hit Humoreske, in einem Arrangement von Franz Waxman, das appellative Platitüden vermeidet. Man schliesst besonders das klavierähnliche Ding ins Herz, das da im Hintergrund ab und an vor sich hin perlt.

Eher diskret bleibt die Widmung Hopes. Er erinnert mit der CD an den 2010 mit 37 Jahren verstorbenen Kollegen Erik Houston, den das Schweizer Publikum vor allem dank einer denkwürdigen Interpretation von Schnittkes Concerto Grosso am Lucerne Festival in Erinnerung hat und der auch am Menuhin Festival Gstaad regelmässiger Gast war. Der Tribut ist stimmig: Denn auch wenn diese Musik zu Herzen geht – die romantischen Topoi von Vergänglichkeit, Tragik und Tod schwingen da immer mit. Ein wunderbares Album. (wb)

“The Romantic Violinist”
SONO Magazin, 18.03.2011

Joseph Joachim war im 19. Jahrhundert neben Teufelsgeiger Niccolò Paganini der berühmteste Violinist. Joachims Spiel muss so farbenreich und tiefgründig gewesen sein, dass große Komponisten wie Schumann, Brahms und Dvořák ihm Werke in die Finger schrieben. Mit einem musikalischen Porträt verbeugt sich nun der mit Schallplattenpreisen überhäufte Daniel Hope vor seinem Kollegen. Mit einem Kammermusik- und Orchesterprogramm, das von einer Violin-Romanze Clara Schumanns bis zur Dvořák-„Humoresque“ und dem berühmten Violinkonzert von Max Bruch reicht. Und selbst Joachim wäre vermutlich von Hopes feurigem und dann wieder herrlich ´singendem´ Violin-Ton begeistert gewesen. Dass Hope aber auch die tiefe Schwester der Geige, die Bratsche einfühlsam beherrscht, zeigt er in einem „Wiegenlied“ von Brahms. Reinhard Lemelle

Besonderheit: Daniel Hope hat sich für die Aufnahme das Bratschenspiel selbst beigebracht.

Tausendsassa Daniel Hope schwelgt in Romantik
Sueddeutsche Zeitung, 17.03.2011

Berlin (dpa) – Stargeiger Daniel Hope gilt als Tausendsassa: Der in Südafrika geborene Brite mit irischem Pass war lange Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trios, wirkte aber auch an Plattenaufnahmen von Sting mit.

Er liebt alte Musik und fördert zugleich mit eigenen Kompositionsaufträgen zeitgenössische Künstler. Zwei Jahre nach seinem Barock-Album «Air» schlägt der 36-Jährige nun wieder ganz neue Saiten an: Seine CD «The Romantic Violinist» ist eine Hommage an den ungarisch-österreichischen Geiger Joseph Joachim (1831-1907).

«Joachim ist eine der faszinierendsten Persönlichkeiten der Musikgeschichte», sagt Hope in einem Gespräch mit der Nachrichtenagentur dpa. «Mit diesem Album habe ich versucht, ein musikalisches Porträt dieses großartigen Geigers zu entwerfen. Wo immer er hinging, hat er die Menschen inspiriert.»

Im Mittelpunkt der Platte steht Max Bruchs Violinkonzert Nr. 1, das Joachim bearbeitet hat. Daneben gibt es Werke seiner Wegbegleiter Franz Schubert, Clara Schumann, Antonin Dvorak und Johannes Brahms. Für dessen «Geistliches Wiegenlied», das er 1864 zur Geburt von Joachims erstem Kind komponierte, brachte Hope sich auf einem geliehenen Instrument selbst das Bratschenspiel bei, Anne Sofie von Otter übernahm den Gesangspart.

«Ich liebe die romantische Epoche und ich bin jemand, der sehr in dieser nostalgischen Welt schwelgt», sagt Hope, dessen jüdische Urgroßeltern bis zur Nazi-Zeit in Berlin-Dahlem lebten und in den gleichen Kreisen wie Joachim verkehrten. «Die Geschichte meiner Familie ist etwas, was mich nach wie vor sehr beschäftigt. Und durch dieses Projekt hatte ich das Gefühl, dass ich meiner Familie, meinen Urgroßeltern etwas näher bin.»

Die Suche nach den Spuren seiner Vorfahren in Berlin hatte Hope schon in seinem zusammen mit der Autorin Susanne Schädlich verfassten Buch «Familienstücke» (2007) geschildert, das ein Bestseller wurde. Obwohl selbst katholisch getauft und evangelisch konfirmiert, fühlt er sich der jüdischen Geschichte besonders verpflichtet. In seiner neuen Aufgabe als Künstlerischer Direktor der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern will er deshalb Versöhnung, Toleranz und Weltoffenheit besonders fördern.

Seine Liebe zur Musik hat Hope schon früh entdeckt. Seine Mutter war durch einen Zufall Halbtagssekretärin bei dem Geigenvirtuosen Yehudi Menuhin in London und nahm ihren Sohn jahrelang mit in dessen Haus. Lange «fiedelte» der kleine Daniel wie besessen mit Stricknadeln, ehe er als Sechsjähriger richtig Geige lernen durfte. Bei seinem ersten Auftritt flog der Rotschopf noch hinterrücks durch eine Schwingtür von der Bühne.

Das kindliche Missgeschick schildert Hope in seinem neuen Buch «Toi, toi, toi! Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik», das fast zeitgleich mit der Platte erschien. Ähnlich wie sein Konzertführer «Wann darf ich klatschen?» vor zwei Jahren ist auch dies ein leichtfüßiges, beschwingtes Büchlein ohne Anspruch auf allzuviel Tiefgang.

Wir erfahren von Beethovens Ausrastern, Bachs Arrest und Anna Netrebkos geplatzter Korsage. Und auch das einstige Wunderkind Joseph Joachim kommt vor: Wegen angeblich zu steifer Bogenführung hatte sein Wiener Geigenlehrer den Neunjährigen einst als hoffnungslosen Fall weggeschickt. Erst ein Lehrerwechsel half.

«Das Problem bei mir ist die Überdosis an kreativer Energie», sagt Hope zu seinem Arbeitspensum. «Da brauche ich manchmal einfach eine Stopptaste.»

Geiger, Erzähler, Erzieher
Salzburger Nachrichten, 15.03.2011

ERNST P. STROBL (SN).

Daniel Hope. Der Ire südafrikanischer Herkunft ist Stargeiger, gab jüngst eine neue „Romantik“-CD heraus und schrieb wieder ein Buch.

Als er vor wenigen Jahren das Buch „Familienstücke“ herausbrachte, staunte man nicht schlecht. Wie ein gelernter Historiker hat Daniel Hope die faszinierende Geschichte seiner Herkunft akribisch erforscht, man erfuhr nicht nur über die bunten, teils dramatischen Lebensgeschichten der irischen und deutsch-jüdischen Vorfahren, sondern auch viel über das 19. und 20. Jahrhundert.

In Südafrika geboren, in England aufgewachsen, hat es Daniel Hope zu einem weltweit gefragten Geiger gebracht, der nicht nur TV-Shows moderiert, sondern als Mitglied des Beaux-Arts-Trios bis zu dessen Auflösung 2008 und als Solist weltweit für Klassik auf höchstem Niveau warb, an Plattenaufnahmen von Sting mitwirkte und überhaupt mit den Mitgliedern von „Police“ musizierte und keinerlei Hemmungen vor jeglichen Grenzüberschreitungen hat.

Im Wiener Konzerthaus gestaltet Daniel Hope gemeinsam mit seinem Pianisten Sebastian Knauer eine Matinee-Reihe, zu der Gäste wie Mirjam Weichselbraun eingeladen sind, mit der er schon die TV-Show „Die besten Opern aller Zeiten“ gestaltete. Zu ausgewählten Themen wie „Wann darf ich klatschen?“ oder „Von Regeln und Ritualen“ gibt es passende Live-Musik samt erläuternden und durchaus erheiternden Moderationen (nächster Termin 15. Mai). Hope scheint eine aufklärerische Mission anzutreiben.

Gerne wendet sich Daniel Hope, wie er im SN-Gespräch in Wien sagte, an junge Leute, etwa bei der TV-Sendung ARTE Lounge, auch Schulprojekte wie das des deutschen Pianisten Lars Vogt unterstützt er leidenschaftlich. Wien hat er übrigens als Wunsch-Wohnsitz im Auge, hier wohnt auch mittlerweile seine Mutter, die in zweiter Ehe mit einem Österreicher verheiratet ist.

Indirekt ist die Mutter „schuld“ an der Geigerkarriere, denn nachdem die Familie – der Vater war Schriftsteller – wegen der Apartheid von Südafrika nach England gezogen war, trat die Mutter eine Stelle als Privatsekretärin von Yehudi Menuhin an und wurde später dessen Managerin. Seit dem 5. Lebensjahr ist Hope nun Geiger, mittlerweile ist er an einem Festival in den USA als künstlerischer Leiter tätig und auch in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern weitet er seine Mitarbeit bei einem Festival aus. Die lange Erfahrung bringt der vielseitig interessierte Geiger auch in sein neues Buch „Toi, toi, toi!“ ein, das sich um „Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik“ dreht.

Da sind eigene Pannen und Hoppalas notiert, die Hope humorvoll schildert, wie auch Geschichten von eingeschlafenen oder besoffenen Musikern, dramatische Ereignisse wie Brandkatastrophen, eine große Zahl lustiger Anekdoten berühmter Musiker: lauter interessanter Lesestoff.

Joseph Joachim spielt keine Rolle in dem Buch, ist aber der heimliche Star der neuen CD von Daniel Hope. Der in Kittsee geborene Geiger (1831–1907) beeinflusste Komponisten wie Max Bruch und Johannes Brahms, die teils für ihn komponierten oder seinen Rat suchten.

„Der romantische Violinist“ heißt die CD (Deutsche Grammophon), enthält natürlich das Violinkonzert von Max Bruch mit dem Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, kurze Stücke von Brahms und Joachim und Brahms’ „Geistliches Wiegenlied“ mit Anne-Sofie von Otter – und da spielt Daniel Hope sogar Bratsche.

Album of the Week: Daniel Hope: ‘The Romantic Violinist’
WQXR 105.9fm-The Classical Music Station of NYC, 13.03.2011

Few classical music fans can name a piece written by Joseph Joachim (1831-1907) yet most almost certainly know the music he inspired and championed. Without the Hungarian violinist-composer we wouldn’t have the Brahms Concerto in D or the Bruch Concerto in G minor, two of the pillars of the modern symphonic repertoire. Concertos by Dvorak and Schumann, as well as the Brahms Double Concerto also bear Joachim’s stamp.

The British violinist Daniel Hope is setting out to present an even fuller picture of Joachim’s creative legacy with “The Romantic Violinist,” a collection that includes pieces dedicated to him and two of his own compositions. It’s our Album of the Week.

Born into a Jewish family in Hungary, Joseph Joachim (pronounced ‘Yo-ACH-him’) became venerated as a thinking man’s answer to more populist virtuosos like Niccolò Paganini and Pablo de Sarasate. While studying under Felix Mendelssohn as a boy, Joachim took up the Beethoven Violin Concerto and his performance, at age 12, caused such a sensation that he effectively restored the forgotten piece to the repertoire. He later became a staunch advocate for Brahms and introduced the composer to Robert and Clara Schumann. Over a long career, Joachim championed a serious brand of music-making that left a lasting mark on the performance tradition.

Hope opens the album with a burnished reading of the Bruch Concerto No. 1 in G minor, a piece Joachim completely revised and improved. Four short pieces by Brahms are included, most surprisingly, the song “Geistliches Wiegenlied” (“Holy Cradle Song”), in which Hope takes up the viola and is joined by mezzo-soprano Anne-Sofie von Otter. Joachim was also a composer in his own right, with over 14 published works to his credit, and Hope applies a big romantic tone to two of his shorter gems: the youthful Romanze and the mature Notturno for violin and orchestra.

Rounding out the program is a lovely (if incongruous) Schubert song transcription by Hope and even Dvorak’s Humoresque in a glowing arrangement by Franz Waxman. Also joining Hope on the album are the pianists Sebastian Knauer and Bengt Forsberg and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under the sensitive direction of Sakari Oramo.

The Romantic Violinist
Daniel Hope, violin
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra
Sakari Oramo, conductor
Deutsche Grammophon

The Romantic Violinist: A Celebration of Joseph Joachim – Review
The Observer, 13.03.2011

by Stephen Pritchard

This tribute to a giant of the 19th-century violin is an engaging run around both Joachim the performer and Joachim the composer. Big-hearted Daniel Hope, backed by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo, seems equally at home in the wide open spaces of Bruch’s violin concerto (which the master totally revised and improved) or the warm intimacy of Joachim’s own delightful Romanze for violin and piano. Hope maintains that the wonderfully lyrical Notturno Op 12 is the epitome of the term “romantic” – touching and inspiring rather than wild and passionate – and in his hands it’s hard to disagree.

Saiten, Pech und Pannen
Die Welt Online, 11.03.2011

Stargeiger Daniel Hope und Hamburger Autor Wolfgang Knauer legen Buch über Missgeschicke in der Welt der Musik vor.

Am Anfang war die Panne. Seine Karriere begann für Daniel Hope im sonnigen Alter von sechs Jahren mit einem Reinfall, der zugleich Rausfall war. Als er gemeinsam mit geigenden Kameraden den Purcell-Saal des Londoner South Bank Centres betrat, um den stolzen Eltern seine frühe Fingerfertigkeit vorzuführen, wurde er direkt vor der Schwingtür platziert. Da lehnte er sich kurz zu weit nach hinten, die Tür gab nach, er verlor den Halt und flog samt Geige rückwärts, während sich die Tür sofort wieder schloss. “Das hätte das Ende meiner Karriere sein können, hätte ich mir das so richtig zu Herzen genommen. Ich habe es aber als Chance begriffen, bin von der Bühne verschwunden und wieder aufgetaucht.”

Seit der initialen Katastrophe seines Geigerlebens sind 30 Jahre vergangen, Hope, einst Meisterschüler von Yehudi Menuhin, zählt zu den Stars der Szene. Jetzt bringt er sein Buch “Toi, Toi, Toi – Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik” heraus, um nicht nur höchst launig von eigenen Blackouts, gerissenen Geigensaiten und verpassten Auftritten zu berichten. Hope gelingt es vielmehr, gemeinsam mit Co-Autor Wolfgang Knauer, einst Kulturchef im NDR-Hörfunk, Musikgeschichte in Form von Musikergeschichten zu erzählen: konzise und spannend.

Bei der überaus vergnüglichen und kurzweiligen Lektüre des Bandes lacht man nicht nur laut auf, man erfährt Erhellendes. Hope erläutert seinen Ansatz: “Wir haben diese riesige Kultur-Schatzkiste, die muss man für die Menschen aufschließen, da ihnen sonst die Zeit, Geduld und Konzentration fehlen, selbst nach dem Schlüssel zu suchen.” Er berichtet, wie schwer es war, aus dem gigantischen Repertoire von Anekdoten auszuwählen: “Es sollte ja nicht nur Slapstick sein. Es geht auch um Kriege, um Aufruhr und um die unglaubliche Wirkung, die Musik auf Menschen hatte. Wir können uns doch heute nicht mehr vorstellen, dass man für eine Sonate ins Gefängnis kommen konnte, wie damals in der Sowjetunion.”

Natürlich weiß Daniel Hope, wie schön Schadenfreude sein kann und dass Musikfreunde sich am besten an die Momente des Scheiterns erinnern: “Dann kann man sich sagen: ‘Gott sei Dank ist mir das nicht passiert.’ Doch dann entdeckt man in vielen Geschichten auch neue Seiten der großen Komponisten, die ja sonst nichts als Halbgötter für uns sind. Ohne diese Meister zu entblößen möchte ich deren menschliche Züge zeigen. Wer würde schon glauben, dass Bach mal im Gefängnis war?”

Das Zusammenspiel von Musik und Politik kommt anschaulich zum Ausdruck, so in den Kapiteln über Richard Wagner und die Revolution, die geplatzte Uraufführung von Hans Werner Henzes “Das Floß der Medusa” im studentenbewegten Jahr 1968 oder den Besuch des spanischen Königspaars in Hamburg: Als die Majestäten zur Aufführung der “Zauberflöte” nicht pünktlich erschienen, entschied Christoph von Dohnányi, seinerzeit Intendant der Staatsoper, nach einer Viertelstunde des Wartens: “Wir sind Republikaner, wir fangen an!” Hopes größtes Verdienst aber ist, dass er uns in seinem Buch Einblick in das verschlossene Seelenleben von Musikern gewährt: “Schlimm genug, wenn man eine falsche Note spielt, noch schlimmer ist es, wenn einem musikalisch eine Phrase nicht glückt. Fehler nimmt man nämlich selbst wie durch ein Vergrößerungsglas wahr. Die ganze Nacht verfolgt einen diese eine Phrase, die danebengegangen ist.”

Ob in seinem Buch, auf der Bühne (am 13. April in der Laeiszhalle), oder auf CD (am 18. März erscheint seine neue Aufnahme “The Romantic Violinist” als Hommage an Joseph Joachim) – Daniel Hope ist ein begnadeter Vermittler von Musik.

History’s most influential violinist?
Time Out, 02.03.2011

Re-evaluating Joachim
Classical Music magazine, 01.03.2011



2010


Violinist Daniel Hope champions Nazi victims
Los Angeles Times, 04.04.2010

By David Ng

Violinist Daniel Hope is a passionate champion of composers who were victims of the Nazis.

 

Describing violinist Daniel Hope is no easy task.

There is first the matter of his nationality. The musician was born in South Africa, raised in England and now travels with an Irish passport even though he makes his home in Hamburg, Germany.

Hope is a much in-demand soloist these days, but the violin isn’t his only vocation. He devotes significant time to climate-change causes and is a published author with two books under his belt — one about concert-going etiquette and another about his family, which he wrote in German.

Perhaps his most passionate activity — and the one that brings him to L.A. this week — is his fascination with composers whose careers suffered at the hands of the Nazi Party.

On Wednesday at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, Hope will perform a concert of pieces by Erwin Schulhoff, a Czech composer who died at a concentration camp in Bavaria in 1942. The free concert, which will feature members of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, will include Schulhoff’s Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Duo for Violin and Cello. (E-mail olga@orel foundation.org to request tickets.)

“The music, regardless of the story connected to it, is powerful,” Hope said recently. “You don’t have to know the story but it makes it richer if you do.”

Schulhoff was a composer who showed great promise but found that his life and career were in danger after the German occupation of Czech territory. The composer, who was both Jewish and a communist, applied for Soviet citizenship with the aim to emigrate. But he was eventually arrested and imprisoned by the Nazis.

His music contains a multitude of influences, including modernism and even jazz. “He was one of the first composers to incorporate jazz elements. Very few composers can manage the synthesis,” Hope said.

Wednesday’s concert is being co-organized by the Orel Foundation, an organization that seeks to spotlight music by composers whose careers were impacted by the cataclysmic events of the mid-20th century.

Hope said his interest in music from the period stems from an incident about 15 years ago when he was driving and heard a string trio on the radio.

“I pulled over to hear the name of the composer — it was Gideon Klein,” Hope recalled. “I didn’t know who he was and I Googled it when I got back home.”

And so was born a new personal obsession. Since then, he has organized concerts and programs around the world to showcase music by composers including Schulhoff, Klein and Hans Krasa. Hope said part of his motivation is genetic — his grandparents were German Jews who were “kicked out of Germany and fled in a variety of directions.”

Hope began playing the violin at age 4 after his family relocated from South Africa to London. Hope’s father had difficulty finding work, and the family was running out of money. Hope’s mother took a job as a secretary for violinist Yehudi Menuhin and ended up working for him for more than 20 years.

Hanging around the office with his mother prompted Hope to take up the instrument. “I simply announced I wanted to be a violinist,” he said. “Neither of my parents were musicians. But I guess I had a strong will.”

Hope, 35, spends much of the year traveling for concerts, festivals and recordings. (He said he’s married but has no children.) Recent projects include a video blog on his official website, where he chronicles his international travels, including a meeting with pop star Sting and a performance at Berlin’s Reichstag.

On Tuesday, Hope is scheduled to teach a master class at USC that is open to the public. Later this year, he will perform in a climate change concert for the Prince of Wales’ Rainforests Project.

Hope will also continue to work on book projects. “My father was a writer, and I was encouraged to express my opinions,” he said. “It’s challenging but we need people to discuss classical music all the time.”

 

Mit Bach und Schubert im Badezimmer
NZZ am Sonntag, 07.02.2010

Der britische Geiger Daniel Hope ist ein Phänomen. Er brilliert als Solist und Kammermusiker, organisiert Festivals und schreibt so vergnügliche wie kluge Bücher. Die Zeit zum Üben stiehlt er sich nachts im Hotel.
Von Manfred Papst

Postkartenwetter in Ober bayern. Still liegt Schloss Elmau im verschneiten Tal. Hoch über der weit läufigen Anlage, die 1916 vom Theologen Johan nes Müller als Begegnungszentrum für seine Künstlerfreunde eröffnet wurde und heute als Hotel dient, glänzt der Wettersteinkamm in der Wintersonne. Es ist eiskalt.
Mit der Geduld und Höflichkeit des grossen Künstlers posiert Daniel Hope für den Fotografen. Mit seiner Geige unterm Arm in den Schnee hinaustreten will er allerdings nicht. Die Kälte könnte dem Instrument schaden. Es ist zwar keine Stradivari oder Guarneri del Gesù, aber immerhin eine Gennaro Gagliano von 1769. «Ich habe sie von meinem Mentor Yehudi Menuhin», erzählt Hope. «Er überliess sie mir, als ich fünfzehn Jahre alt war, und nach fünfzehn weiteren Jahren hatte ich sie schliesslich abbezahlt.»

Ins Schloss Elmau ist Hope gekommen, um im Rahmen der Kammermusiktage mit seinem langjährigen Klavierpartner Sebastian Knauer einen Duoabend zu geben. Anderntags geht es um sechs Uhr morgens schon weiter nach Hamburg, wo Hope einen seiner Wohnsitze hat – die anderen sind in London und Wien -, und von dort weiter rund um die ganze Welt.
Der umtriebige Künstler, der nicht nur seine Karriere als Solist verfolgt, sondern auch Festivals in Deutschland und den USA organisiert, Bücher schreibt und für Radio und Fernsehen arbeitet, ist überall und nirgends zu Hause. Das kann nicht erstaunen, wenn man seine Herkunft betrachtet.

Von Südafrika nach England
Geboren wurde Daniel Hope 1974 im südafrikanischen Durban. Seine Vorfahren waren einerseits irische Katholiken, die während des zweiten Burenkriegs mittellos nach Südafrika kamen und es dort zu Wohlstand brachten, andererseits deutsche Juden, die als Industrielle in der Weimarer Republik zum Grossbürgertum gehörten, während des Dritten Reiches aber unter Zurücklassung ihrer ganzen Habe fliehen mussten und ebenfalls in Südafrika eine neue Existenz aufbauten. Dort fanden die beiden scheinbar so gegensätzlichen Familien zusammen. Als Daniel ein halbes Jahr alt war, kehrten sein Eltern, die sich als Gegner der Apartheid in Südafrika zunehmend fremd fühlten, nach Europa zurück. Sie gingen nach England. Der Vater war ein damals noch erfolgloser Schriftsteller, die Mutter übernahm alle möglichen Arbeiten, um die Familie über Wasser zu halten. Durch einen Glücksfall lernte sie Yehudi Menuhin kennen, der sie als Sekretärin einstellte, aber bald schon ihr Potenzial erkannte und sie zu seiner Managerin machte. Sie organisierte seine Auftritte, reiste mit ihm, war sein Mädchen für alles. Die Kinder nahm sie nach Möglichkeit mit. Eine Geschichte wie im Märchen.

Glücklich in Saanen
Der kleine Daniel und sein Bruder wuchsen also in einem musikfreundlichen Klima auf. Sie krabbelten unter dem Flügel eines Weltstars herum, sahen prominente Besucher aus und ein gehen, sassen ehrfürchtig im Konzertsaal. Die intensivsten Erinnerungen hat Hope an die Mauritius-Kirche in Saanen bei Gstaad, wo jährlich das Menuhin-Festival stattfand. «Wir verbrachten jeden Sommer im Berner Oberland, bis ich 18 oder 19 war», erzählt er, «und die herrliche Landschaft verband sich für mich mit dem sakralen Raum und der göttlichen Musik, die Meister wie Rostropowitsch und Kempff dort spielten.» Als neugieriger, offener Geist lud Menuhin aber auch Leute wie den indischen Sitar-Virtuosen Ravi Shankar und den französischen Swing-Geiger Stéphane Grappelli ein. Und hier hörte Hope zum ersten Mal – damals noch unter der Leitung von Edmond de Stoutz – das Zürcher Kammerorchester, das er überaus schätzt und mit dem er dieses Jahr zusammenarbeitet.
Ein Wunderkind war Daniel Hope nicht. Er liebte die Musik, aber sie flog ihm nicht einfach zu, und nirgends war er so unglücklich wie in der Menuhin School of Music, einem Internat in Surrey. Er starb schier vor Heimweh, hasste die rigiden Erziehungsmethoden und liess keinen Streich aus. «Ich spielte gern und fand mich ganz gut», erzählt er, «aber als ich etwa zwölf Jahre alt war und Gleichaltrige hörte, wurde mir bewusst, dass ich überhaupt nicht viel konnte. Ich sagte mir: Wenn etwas aus dir werden soll, musst du jetzt wirklich arbeiten. Das tat ich dann, und mit dem Üben wuchs die Freude.»

Das tägliche Spielen ist bis heute das A und O für Daniel Hope. «Ich bin nun einmal kein Fritz Kreisler, dem man nachsagt, er habe nie geübt», erklärt er. «Aber mein Glück ist es, dass ich keine speziellen Voraussetzungen zum Spielen brauche. Der kleinste Raum genügt mir. Die meiste Zeit des Jahres bin ich ja unterwegs. Dann gehe ich jeweils ins Bad meines Hotelzimmers, setze den Dämpfer auf die Geige und spiele. Ich störe niemanden und bin selig. Manchmal musiziere ich die ganze Nacht.»

Auch vor jedem Konzert probt Hope mehrere Stunden – egal, wie gut er das Programm schon kennt. Er muss es sich vergegenwärtigen, damit er auf dem Podium die volle Konzentration aufbringen kann. Lampenfieber gehört dazu. «Ich bin nie <cool>», sagt er. «Die letzte Viertelstunde vor dem Auftritt ist die Hölle. Man sitzt in der stickigen Garderobe, und es kribbelt im Bauch.»
Diese Aussage erstaunt bei einem Künstler, der schon früh vom Erfolg verwöhnt wurde, mittlerweile von Triumph zu Triumph eilt und selbst in der globalen Krise der Tonträgerindustrie zu den Happy Few gehört, die einen Exklusivvertrag mit einem renommierten Label haben. Aber Daniel Hope kokettiert nicht, wenn er die Musik als grausame Geliebte bezeichnet. Er gilt als Perfektionist. Um virtuose Selbstdarstellung geht es ihm jedoch nicht. Er sieht sich als Vermittler. Die Musik, wie sie vom Komponisten geschrieben und gemeint war, umzusetzen, ohne sich unnötig zwischen sie und den Zuhörer zu schieben: Das ist sein Anliegen. Seine Begeisterung gilt dem Werk, nicht der artistischen Prachtentfaltung. «Die Technik», sagt er, «ist natürlich die Voraussetzung. Man muss die schwierigen Stellen im Schlaf beherrschen. Der Zuhörer soll keine Anstrengung bemerken. Schnelligkeit per se bedeutet mir aber gar nichts. Die wahren Probleme der Gestaltung fangen erst an, wenn alle technischen Probleme gelöst sind.»

Sobald das Gespräch auf bestimmte Werke kommt, zeigt Hope sich als glühender Enthusiast. Über Schumann, Mendelssohn, Brahms spricht er mit dem gleichen Feuer wie über Schnittke, den er in dessen letzten Lebensjahren immer wieder besucht hat, oder über den weitgehend unbekannten Basler Komponisten Hermann Suter. Der deutschen Klassik ist er seit je verfallen. «Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven und Schubert können wir nur mit Dankbarkeit und Demut bestaunen», sagt er. Doch am Ende geht ihm nichts über Bach: «Er ist der tiefsinnigste und modernste Komponist, den ich kenne. Ich möchte seine Sonaten für Violine und Cembalo gern neu einspielen. Zwar gelten seine Solosonaten als Pièce de Résistance. Aber von ihnen gibt es so viele grossartige Aufnahmen. Henryk Szeryng mit seinem runden, kathedralenhaften Klang. Nathan Milstein mit seiner strengen Eleganz. George Enescu. Adolf Busch. Gidon Kremer. Ich finde aber auch die Aufnahmen mit barocken Instrumenten und Rundbogen interessant. Jeder Geiger sollte sich einmal auf diese Erfahrung einlassen. Rundbogen erlauben einem, Akkorde tatsächlich im Pianissimo zu spielen, wie Bach es vorschreibt. Mit dem modernen Bogen, den man über die Saiten reissen muss, geht das nicht.»

Gibt es auch Musik, die Daniel Hope kalt lässt? Er denkt lange nach. «In jedem Zeitalter gibt es langweilige Komponisten», sagt er schliesslich. «Aber die spiele ich einfach nicht. Und natürlich gibt es im kommerziellen Pop jede Menge ödes Zeug.» Den Pop als solchen möchte er aber keineswegs verteufeln. Prince und Sting, U2 und Depeche Mode findet er grandios.

Zu Daniel Hopes wichtigsten Erfahrungen als Musiker zählen die sechseinhalb Jahre, die er mit dem Beaux Arts Trio verbracht hat. Er war der letzte Geiger dieser legendären Formation, die unter der Ägide des Pianisten Menachem Pressler über ein halbes Jahrhundert lang bestand. «Jedes Ende hat etwas Trauriges», meint er dazu, «aber ich glaube, dass wir im richtigen Moment aufgehört haben. Wir haben vierhundert Konzerte gegeben, auf allen Festivals, in allen grossen Sälen der Welt. Und wir durften die schönste Musik überhaupt spielen. Beethoven. Schubert. Brahms. Für mich war das ein unbeschreibliches Glück.»

Derzeit kann Daniel Hope sich nicht vorstellen, nochmals in einer festen Kammermusikformation zu spielen. Zum einen lässt sich die Arbeit mit dem Beaux Arts Trio kaum toppen. Zum andern hat er zu viele andere Projekte. «Ich liebe Kammermusik», sagt er. «Ich kann ohne sie nicht leben. Ich werde sie zweifellos so oft wie möglich privat mit Freunden spielen. Aber als Ensemble an der Weltspitze mitzuwirken, die Interpretationen immer wieder zu perfektionieren – das geht nur, wenn man nichts anderes tut.»

Und Daniel Hope hat viele andere Pläne. CDs mit der Deutschen Grammophon. Konzerte als Solist – mit grossen Orchestern oder kleinen Ensembles, die er von der Geige aus leitet. Ambitionen als Dirigent hat er jedoch nicht. «Das überlasse ich lieber denen, die es können», sagt er. «Es gibt so viele grossartige Instrumentalisten, die mittelmässige Dirigenten geworden sind. Dirigent wird man nicht einfach so. Man muss es studieren. Die Harmonielehre beherrschen, Partitur lesen können, jedes Instrument in seiner Eigenart von Grund auf kennen.»
Mit diesen Worten verabschiedet Daniel Hope sich so freundlich wie bestimmt. Die Probe für den Abend ruft.

Fotos: Daniel Hope mit seiner Gagliano-Geige aus dem Jahr 1769 in der Bibliothek von Schloss Elmau. (15. Januar 2010)
SIMON KOY

Foto: Im Schnee nur ohne Geige: Daniel Hope.
SIMON KOY

Bücher, CD, Konzerte
Virtuos als Autor wie als Musiker

Daniel Hope hat zwei Bücher geschrieben: «Familienstücke», eine autobiografische Spurensuche (Rowohlt 2007, 320 S., Fr. 35.40) und «Wann darf ich klatschen?», einen heiteren Wegweiser für (vor allem junge) Konzertgänger (Rowohlt 2009, 253 S., Fr. 34.90). Für das renommierte Label Deutsche Grammophon, bei dem er exklusiv unter Vertrag ist, hat er Werke von Vivaldi über Mendelssohn bis zu Pavel Haas und Olivier Messiaen eingespielt. Im März 2010 geht er mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester, das er von der Violine aus leitet, auf eine Tournee, die ihn am 10. 3. auch in die Tonhalle Zürich führt. Auf dem Programm stehen Werke von Bach, Händel, Telemann, Pachelbel, Biber, Vivaldi und anderen. (pap.)

 



2009


High notes in America’s Deep South
Guardian, 21.11.2009

Bluegrass, fado, opera and jazz fuse together at Georgia’s glorious medley of a festival. Kate Connolly falls in love with the music, history and mint juleps

Saturday, 21 November 2009, by Kate Connolly

The man who drives me from the airport to my hotel sings for much of the way; the receptionist croons Someone to Watch Over Me as I check in, and in one of the city’s elegant squares a workman performs spirituals in his lunch break, while another strums on his guitar. That Savannah is a city that lives for and thrives on music is clear to me before I even hit the Savannah Music Festival.

I arrive about a week into the proceedings, expecting a colourful apple-pie, foot-tapping mixture of bluegrass and jazz to country and swing; but the range and virtuosity of world-class music, from boogie to Cajun, fado to zydeco – a form of American folk – which I savour over the next few days, comes as something of a surprise.

Savannah, a coastal city in southwest Georgia, boasts a springtime arts marathon that has become a requisite port of call for a growing number of music lovers and musicians from around the world. For me, escaping a European winter to be spirited into this colourful and beguiling city, enveloped in dreamy Spanish moss, magnolia trees and pink and white azaleas, is an added bonus.

Stepping into the cool body of Wesley Monumental Methodist church I receive my first taste of what’s on tap for three weeks every year. With early spring light filtering through the stained-glass, pianist Sebastian Knauer hypnotises a lunchtime audience with Mendelssohn compositions, including Rondo Capriccioso, a quirky sonic portrait of a gondola splashing on the canals of Venice.

On the church steps festival director Rob Gibson, a dapper Georgia native who talks the syrupy southern talk, greets each audience member. Gibson, who founded the now legendary Jazz at the Lincoln Center series in New York in the early 90s before settling in Savannah following 9/11, is credited with rescuing the festival from provincial obscurity and turning it into one of the most talked-about music events in the States.

A former lecturer in American music history at the Juilliard School, he has created something of a musical laboratory where artists from different genres come together to experiment and fuse their sounds in a relaxed and stimulating atmosphere.

Gibson’s connections help lure some of the top names, including jazz greats Wynton and Jason Marsalis, Marcus Roberts and Wycliffe Gordon, English opera tenor Ian Bostridge and the Portuguese Fado singer Mariza.

The eclectic range of the programming is reflected in the 2010 schedule – the most artistically diverse line-up to date. There will be appearances by the Chinese piano wizard Lang Lang, celebrated Malian ngoni player Bassekou Kouyate, Wynton Marsalis’ Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, and Cherryholmes, a grammy-nominated family band, whose music has been described as “bluegrass on steroids”.

“I don’t know any other festival in the US that has the breadth of ours,” Gibson tells me over a salmon and spinach salad in Zunzi’s, a popular lunchtime restaurant. Savannah is the perfect backdrop for the festival, he says, describing it as “funky and elegant”, before cycling off to introduce the next concert.

Later, in the Congregation Mikveh Israel synagogue, one of the oldest in America, Cuban guitarist Manuel Barrueco captivates the audience with an exquisite range of renaissance lute works and Spanish dance music, elegantly wiping the perspiration from his brow in between pieces.

The unstuffy and jovial flavour of the festival is captured in that evening’s impromptu gathering of musicians, concert-goers and festival staff at the Circa 1875 wine bar on Whitaker Street. Over a cold beer, Daniel Hope, a British violinst who has been an artistic director of the festival since 2004, explains why he returns to perform year after year. “The experience is unique,” he says. “You spend a week or two weeks together, eating, drinking, going to salsa parties, exploring music, enjoying music and savouring each other’s company in a beautiful setting.”

The party later moves onto Pinkie Master’s, a grungy, moody jukebox joint, which locals affectionately refer to as Stinky Bastards, where Jimmy Carter is said to have stood on the bar and declared his intention to become US president.

The magic and mystique of Savannah which draws people like Hope, is expanded on by Sue Rendeno of Savannah Walks. During a gap between concerts Sue leads me on a fascinating journey through the city’s rich past. She takes me around the Gothic cemetery which, Savannahians boast, is one of the most haunted places in the world; to the old cloth hall that recently lost its trademark golden griffin to a speeding driver who bounced off its outspread wings, smashing it to smithereens; and points out whimsical details in the architecture such as the dolphin-shaped drain spouts.

Further reminders of the city’s musical DNA are the homes of the late composers James Pierpont – responsible for Jingle Bells – and Johnny Mercer, whose lengthy repertoire of hits included Moon River.

We stroll through several of the 21 squares shaded with majestic live oaks that are laid out like stepping stones across the city and connect the festival venues – all of which are easily reachable on foot.

These oases of calm – the most popular is Chippewa Square where a scene from Forrest Gump was shot – are a legacy of the city’s colonial past and the design of settlers who sailed up the Savannah river in early 1733. But it’s thanks to General Sherman, who spared Savannah during his scorched earth march through Georgia during the civil war, that they remain intact (Atlanta, by contrast, was flattened).

If you prefer two wheels to two legs, a good option is to return late at night, when the streets are empty, for a bike tour to experience the city’s highlight, Forsythe Park, with its grand, floodlit cast-iron fountain and check which of the well-documented ghosts are on the prowl.

Back at the festival, by the riverside, children’s big bands are playing to a huge crowd, as part of the Swing Central section of the fortnight’s events. This jazz band competition also lets the youngsters receive lessons from their musical heroes in the hope that they will be inspired to great things in the future.

That evening’s supper is black grouper – a deep-sea fish found along the Savannah coast – at the chic but unpretentious downtown restaurant Cha Bella. It sets me up for the 1920’s vauderville-style Lucas Theatre, which tonight features the New-York-based group Punch Brothers led by one of the world’s most celebrated mandolin players, Chris Thile. When this gaggle of nervously-energetic young string musicians appears I am expecting traditional bluegrass. Instead they dish up a mesmerising series of compositions, at once haunting and playful. A thunder storm rages outside as they sing about everything from a honey-haloed teacher, to sheep dogs, punch bowls and drunken girls combining pithy lyrics (‘the night was a chalkboard with a fingernail moon’) with witty banter. “You guys are really sweet, can we keep you?” says 28-year-old Thile, to the whoops of the females in the audience.

The following morning I bump into the Punch Brothers – undoubtedly my festival highlight. They’re in the B Matthew’s Eatery on East Bay Street, tucking into grits, scrambled eggs, wheatberry bread and hashbrowns, washed down with mimosas and mint juleps, before they embark on a four-hour drive to their next concert in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

“Shame we have to bail out, it’s just awesome here,” says Noam Pikelny, the band’s blue-eyed banjo player. “The town is full of a gorgeous line-up of artists, many of them our heroes, who we’d love to hear.”

Savannah’s eccentric air is perhaps most memorably evoked in John Berendt’s best-selling 1994 novel, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. The tale of murder, black and white magic and a bawdy black drag queen named The Lady Chablis, urges visitors not to take Savannah at face value: “You mustn’t be taken in by the moonlight and magnolias,” Berendt writes. “There’s more to Savannah than that.”

The elegant home of protagonist Jim Williams (played by Kevin Spacey in the 1997 film version directed by Clint Eastwood) can be found on Monterey Square. And the 51-year old Lady Chablis still occasionally performs at Club One on Jefferson Street.

The close proximity of everything in this city means you’re never far from the festival’s goings on. In the basement of the Avia hotel I eavesdrop on a laughter-filled rehearsal by Hope’s chamber music quintet which is practising Schubert’s Death and the Maiden.

Later that evening, in more sombre mood, they perform the Schubert followed by Elgar’s piano quintet in A minor at the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, which feels like a posh living room.

Afterwards musicians and festival staff seek some R ‘n’ R at a “roots ‘n’ twang” concert by the tiny-waisted, sweet-voiced Lovell Sisters. They charm the audience with their song Paulita Maxwell, a sassy tribute to Billy the Kid’s girlfriend and a great way to round off the evening.

When my festival run comes to an end I toy with the idea of extending my stay and foregoing two days in New York, so torn do I feel about leaving behind the charms of the Deep South. Its wide-ranging musical delights mean that Savannah competes with some of the very best music festivals in the world.

Add in, of course, its azaleas brushed by the warm breeze, the succulent Georgia white shrimp, and the steady flow of mint juleps, and as far as I’m concerned, there are plenty of compelling reasons to return.

Als gäb’s kein Urheberrecht
ZEIT ONLINE, 13.11.2009

Die neue CD des Geigers Daniel Hope erklärt, wie schon im 17. Jahrhundert unbekümmert gesampelt wurde. Dazu wirft sein Buch einen Blick hinter die Kulissen der Klassik-Branche.

von Volker Schmidt – 11. November 2009

Daniel Hope ist ein Mann der Bindestriche: ein südafrikanisch-britischer Geiger mit verworrenen irisch-deutsch-kosmopolitischen Wurzeln und ein beliebter Talk-Show-Gast. Er hat viel zu erzählen und tut es sehr amüsant. Von seiner Mutter Eleanor, erst Sekretärin, dann Managerin von Yehudi Menuhin, der dem kleinen Daniel viel beigebracht hat. Von Rabbinern unter den Ahnen, enteigneten Villen in Berlin und vom Südafrika der Apartheid, das Hopes Eltern 1975, gleich nach Daniels Geburt, aus Protest verließen.

Im Buch Familienstücke forschte der Geiger der Familiengeschichte nach; es wurde trotz seines etwas umständlichen Stils zum Bestseller. Jetzt beschäftigt Hope sich in einem Buch mit dem Konzertalltag vor und hinter den Kulissen: Wann darf ich klatschen? will kein Knigge sein, sondern Appetit machen auf Konzerte und die Angst nehmen vor den vielen Regeln, die einst geschaffen wurden, um ein elitäres Publikum vom Plebs abzugrenzen. Ihm zur Seite stand als Koautor Wolfgang Knauer, der langjährige Chef von NDR Kultur und Vater des Pianisten Sebastian Knauer, der Daniel Hope durch mehrere Konzertprogramme begleitete.

Auch Hopes neue CD ist von einiger Leichtigkeit geprägt, will die Eintrittsschwelle zu einer oft als spröde empfundenen Musikepoche senken: zum Barock. Für das Cover von Air. A Baroque Journey ließ sich der Violinist selbstironisch auf einer Klappleiter ablichten, den Geigenkasten in der Hand, vor wolkig gemaltem Hintergrund. Auf dem Buchtitel steht er vor dem gleichen Wölkchenhimmel, nur ohne Leiter.

Air begibt sich auf die Spuren vier wenig bekannter Komponisten des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts, Andrea Falconieri, Nicola Matteis, Johann Paul von Westhoff und Francesco Geminiani. Dazu kommt Musik, die diese vier beeinflusste, von eher volkstümlichen Werken bis zu Großkomponisten wie Pachelbel, Telemann, Händel und Bach, dessen wundervolle Air das Album beendet.

Wer bei Barockmusik zuerst an Bach denkt, an das Erstrahlen des Erhabenen aus dem Geist der Mathematik, der wird schwer schlucken an diesen Aufnahmen. Mit Schrammelgitarre, Trommel und Tamburin beginnt das Album und verdeutlicht so, dass die höfischen Canones, Gigues und Gagliardes allesamt der Tanzmusik entstammen, dem Humus, auf dem die musikalischen Höhepunkte der Zeit gediehen.

Für das Booklet durfte Roger Willemsen dem Geiger kluge Fragen stellen, und Hope sagt Dinge wie diese: “Viele der reisenden Musiker haben die Musik als tägliches Brot gesehen, als Gelderwerb. Sie wurden nicht angehimmelt wie später Mozart und Beethoven, sondern sie sahen sich als Dienstleister für König und Adel, vor allem mit ihrer Tanzmusik.”

Nach der großen europäischen Katastrophe, dem Dreißigjährigen Krieg, seinen Verheerungen und Seuchen, gerät im 17. Jahrhundert vieles in Bewegung. Hope sagt: “Der Umbruch fasziniert mich, man fühlt den Aufbruch aus der Renaissance-Zeit. Plötzlich treten Einzelpersonen hervor, Wandermusiker zum Beispiel, die durch Europa ziehen und ganz andere Musik mitbringen, wie Matteis. Es war eine Zeit der Bewegung. Diese Musik hat Vielfalt, Esprit, Vitalität, und vieles wurde durchaus auf den Effekt zugeschrieben. Man wollte gefallen, wollte wieder beauftragt werden”.

Der fast vergessene Westhoff etwa mag kein genialer Komponist gewesen sein, aber ein großer Violinvirtuose. Er perfektionierte Techniken für die gerade erst erfundene Geige, etwa das bariolage, bei dem der Bogen über alle vier Saiten streicht, und faszinierte damit Komponisten wie Antonio Vivaldi. Ohne die Praktiker des Tonsetzens, die von Hof zu Hof reisenden Unterhaltungskomponisten und Gebrauchsmusikanten, gäb’s keine Thomaskantoren, keine Messias-Chöre. Das ist die eine Lehre des Albums.

Der fast vergessene Westhoff etwa mag kein genialer Komponist gewesen sein, aber ein großer Violinvirtuose. Er perfektionierte Techniken für die gerade erst erfundene Geige, etwa das bariolage, bei dem der Bogen über alle vier Saiten streicht, und faszinierte damit Komponisten wie Antonio Vivaldi. Ohne die Praktiker des Tonsetzens, die von Hof zu Hof reisenden Unterhaltungskomponisten und Gebrauchsmusikanten, gäb’s keine Thomaskantoren, keine Messias-Chöre. Das ist die eine Lehre des Albums.

Diesmal verknüpft der Geiger im Buch und auf CD also nicht persönliche und familiäre Erinnerungen mit Musik wie in Familienstücke oder mit seiner Aufnahme des Mendelssohnschen Violinkonzerts, das er als Achtjähriger heimlich übte und so den Rauswurf aus der Musikschule riskierte. Jetzt erzählt er im Buch Wann darf ich klatschen? über den Musikbetrieb und was er so davon hält, reiht amüsante Anekdoten an programmatische Aussagen und streut ein paar Bratscher-Witze ein. Und auf der CD begibt er sich in die Musikgeschichte – gestaltet die Entdeckungsreise aber aus seinem subjektiven Blick, gibt ihr eine narrative Struktur. Hope ist nicht nur ein hervorragender Geiger – er ist auch ein musikalischer Erzähler. Zuhören lohnt sich.

Wer zu früh klatscht, den bestraft der Dirigent
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 20.10.2009

Feuilleton — Neue Sachbücher
Wie nutzt man die Pause? Was ist ein “Konzert ohne Frack”? Wann setzt der  Beifall ein? Daniel Hope hat einen Wegweiser für Konzertgänger geschrieben.

Der Geiger Daniel Hope hat zusammen mit Wolfgang Knauer ein Buch geschrieben, in dem Moritz und Lena (ein junges Ehepaar, beide Banker) und Larry, ein Taxifahrer aus San Francisco, eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Sie sind, als Widerpart und Gesprächspartner Hopes, aufgeweckte Leute und stellen die richtigen Fragen zur richtigen Zeit.

Allein, sie haben bislang keinen Zugang zur klassischen Musik. Das wird sich im Verlaufe des Buches naturgemäß ändern. “Wann darf ich klatschen?”: Der “Wegweiser für Konzertgänger” soll vor allem solchen, die es werden wollen, Orientierung bieten. Das tut er auf eine durchaus sympathische Weise in schlichten Worten und mit einigem Humor. Daniel Hope ist es gelungen, zusammen mit seinem Koautor eine denkbar geradlinige Einführung in das Wesen und die Riten des klassischen Musikbetriebs zu geben. Auf eine kurze Erörterung der wichtigsten musikgeschichtlichen Epochen folgen Informationen zur Kleiderordnung auf der Bühne und im Saal, zum Seelenleben eines Orchesters, zum Verhältnis von Dirigent und Solist, zur Frage des Lampenfiebers, zur seelischen Befindlichkeit des Solisten, zu den Bräuchen des Verbeugens und Beklatschens und zur Frage angemessener Eintrittspreise. Kleine Übersichten – von kurzen Porträts der berühmtesten Dirigenten bis hin zu den besten Orchesterwitzen – runden das insgesamt schlüssige Konzept ab. Wer nichts wusste über das, was sich in einem Konzertsaal vor, auf und hinter der Bühne abspielt, wird dieses Buch mit Gewinn lesen; und man möchte hoffen, dass es nicht bloß als “Geschenkbuch” verbreitet wird, sondern just jene Leser erreicht, an die es sich richtet.

Freilich fußt “Wann darf ich klatschen?” auf Prämissen, die man durchaus in Zweifel ziehen kann. Hope hat sie gleich zu Beginn in dem Kapitel “Warum dieses Buch?” zusammengefasst. Zu den Prämissen gehört, das Interesse an Klassik habe spürbar nachgelassen; es gebe allenthalben einen Besucherschwund bei den Konzerten, die Schallplattenindustrie verzeichne dramatische Einbrüche. Die Zukunft des klassischen Konzerts sei keineswegs gesichert. In dieser krisenhaften Lage bietet nun Hope seine Dienste als “Fremdenführer” an.

Die Rede von der Krise des klassischen Konzertbetriebs ist nicht eben neu, und sie fußt trotz vielfacher Wiederholung auf schwacher empirischer Grundlage. Angeblich ist das Klassikpublikum überaltert. Aber wann je haben in der Geschichte des bürgerlichen Konzerts die Fünfzehn- bis Dreißigjährigen die Säle gefüllt? Wer zwei Stunden ruhig zuhören kann, hat meist bereits ein bestimmtes Alter erreicht – und die Leute werden ja auch immer älter. In Deutschland werden heutzutage mehr klassische Konzerte veranstaltet als je zuvor in der Geschichte. Hunderte von Festivals überziehen das Land mit ihren teils hochattraktiven Angeboten: Staatliche, städtische und freie Spitzenensembles sowie eine oftmals blühende Kirchenmusik buhlen um Zuhörer. Um jedes Konzert zu füllen, müsste Deutschland eine Bevölkerungsexplosion erlebt haben. So aber wächst vor allem der Konkurrenzdruck. Würde man die absolute Zahl aller Besucher klassischer Konzerte von 1960 und heute vergleichen, würde man wohl herausfinden, dass sie stark gestiegen ist.

Die großen CD-Firmen kriseln zwar in der Tat; dafür aber schießen kleine Labels wie Pilze aus dem Boden. Die Branche erlebt einen tiefgreifenden Strukturwandel, der mit dem sich verändernden Repertoire der Musiker zu erklären ist: Nicht mehr die großen Werke des klassischen Kanons bestimmen heute allein die Konzertprogramme, sondern hochspezialisierte Ensembles werben mit teils entlegenen und dennoch hochinteressanten Werken um Aufmerksamkeit. Sie sind bei den kleinen Plattenproduzenten viel besser aufgehoben als bei den großen Konzernen.

Richtig ist gewiss Daniel Hopes Bemerkung, manch einem käme das klassische Konzert mit seiner stereotypen Programmfolge und seinen Riten “altmodisch und verstaubt” vor. Aber auch hier ändert sich vieles mit atemberaubender Geschwindigkeit. Große Orchester laden zu “Konzerten ohne Frack” oder “After Work Lounges” ein, Musikfeste veranstalten “Sonnenaufgangskonzerte” morgens um sieben; Familienkonzerte am Sonntagvormittag werden überrannt; Gesprächskonzerte sind ungeheuer populär, Konzerteinführungen erleben einen ungeahnten Boom. Die Angebote der Chöre und Orchester an die Schulen sind inzwischen so reichhaltig, dass manch ein Lehrer erschöpft aufseufzt. Der Frack freilich ist immer seltener zu sehen; in die Konzerte der Ensembles für Alte und Neue Musik (auch sie Kinder von Achtundsechzig) hatte er ohnehin nie Einzug gehalten.

Was die Ordnung des Konzertprogramms betrifft, so ist die Pause nach dem Solokonzert und vor der Symphonie schon lange nicht mehr sakrosankt. Die überraschendsten Programmkonstellationen sind inzwischen denkbar, Crossover inbegriffen. Was verlorengeht, ist das klassische Konzert als Gottesdienst der Kunstreligion. Man muss diesen Verlust nicht beklagen, und fromme Menschen mögen sich freuen, dass das religiöse Empfinden nun wieder dorthin zurückkehren kann, wo es hingehört: in die Kirche. Alles zusammengenommen, besteht zum Runzeln der Stirn kein Anlass.

Inmitten dieses von Vitalität zeugenden Umbruchs wirkt Daniel Hopes freundliches kleines Buch weniger wie eine dringend benötigte Medizin, sondern eher wie ein Indiz für den sich quasi von selbst vollziehenden Wandel des klassischen Musikbetriebs.
Michael Gassmann
Daniel Hope: “Wann darf ich klatschen?”. Ein Wegweiser für Konzertgänger. Mit Zeichnungen von Christina Thrän. Rowohlt Verlag, Reinbek 2009. 256 S., geb., 19,90 [Euro].
F.A.Z., 20.10.2009, Nr. 243 / Seite 30

 

Wie modern ist Barock?
Rondo Magazine, 21.09.2009

Daniel Hope ist nicht nur der Autor eines neuen Buchs für Klassikeinstieger „Wann darf ich klatschen?“, das im Herbst erscheint. Die darin aufgeworfene Frage „Wie modern ist Barock?“ beantwortet er quasi auch mit seiner neuesten CD…

Und hier klatschen Sie richtig!
Hamburger Abendblatt, 16.09.2009

Liegen die Hürden für den Einstieg in den Live-Genuss klassischer Musik zu hoch? Der Star-Geiger hilft Einsteigern, sich im Konzertsaal wohlzufühlen.

Hamburg. Klassische Konzerte sind die Sorgenkinder der Kulturveranstalter. Der Altersdurchschnitt des Publikums steigt, Nachwuchs bleibt aus, mancher sieht den klassischen Konzertbetrieb schon aussterben.

Aber wäre das so bedauerlich angesichts immer mehr und perfekterer Aufnahmen? Daniel Hope meint: ja. Natürlich ist der südafrikanisch-britische Geiger, ein international gefragter Solist, parteiisch: „Klassische Musik live ist das Größte”, sagt er, „nichts sonst setzt in einem einzigen Moment so viele Glückshormone frei.”

Hope hat die Initiative ergriffen. Während sich Veranstalter und Kulturschaffende überall den Kopf über „coole Locations” und neue Konzertformen zerbrechen, nimmt er den Blickwinkel des potenziellen Hörers ein. „Wann darf ich klatschen?” heißt sein Plädoyer, das er mithilfe des Hamburger Autors Wolfgang Knauer verfasst hat. Gestern stand Hope auf dem Programm des Harbour Front Literaturfestivals – mit einer Lesung, dem Lautenisten Stefan Maass und Auszügen aus seiner CD, die wie das Buch am Freitag erscheint.

Am Tag vor der Lesung sitzt er im Café Leonar am Grindel, seinem Lieblingscafé in Hamburg. Auch wer ihn bislang nur auf der Bühne erlebt hat, erkennt ihn gleich am rötlichen Schopf und den Augen, die sofort Kontakt aufnehmen. Die Gewandtheit seines Auftretens, das Tweedjackett und sein erstaunlich flüssiges Deutsch verraten den Weltenbürger. Auf die Idee, das Buch zu schreiben, kam Hope während einer Lesereise mit seinem ersten Buch „Familienstücke”: „Da traf ich Leute, die Musik lieben, aber nicht ins Konzert gehen. Das war für mich etwas ganz Neues. Einmal hat sich ein Mann gemeldet und gesagt, er hört gern CDs, aber ins Konzert traut er sich nicht. Da habe ich gedacht: Wie kann man den Menschen dieses Gefühl nehmen?”

Was man kennt, muss man nicht fürchten. Deshalb hat Hope eine kurze, amüsante und treffende Einführung in den klassischen Konzertbetrieb geschrieben. Er beschreibt den Ablauf eines Konzerts, lädt zu einem kurzen Ausflug in die Musikgeschichte ein und erklärt, woher die so unverständlich wirkenden, starren Regeln kommen, die so viele von einem Konzertbesuch abhalten.

Die sind nämlich nicht gottgegeben. Zu Mozarts Zeiten unterhielt man sich während einer Aufführung zwanglos, verließ den Saal, lachte und speiste. Die Musik war zur Unterhaltung des Adels da. Erst mit dem Aufkommen des bürgerlichen Sinfoniekonzerts im 19. Jahrhundert begann man, streng in Reihe zu sitzen und andächtig zu lauschen.

Weil sich diese Benimmregeln in Deutschland bis heute gehalten haben, fühlt sich mancher als Eindringling in einem elitären Kreis von Abonnenten, die lieber unter sich bleiben möchten. Beifall zur falschen Zeit kann einem das Kopfschütteln von Hunderten eintragen – und so ein Erlebnis kann einen Konzertneuling umgehend aus dem Weihetempel der Musik verscheuchen. Auch wollen viele Hörer nicht stundenlang stillsitzen, sondern wie bei einem Rockkonzert Gefühle körperlich ausdrücken. Und dann der vermutete Dresscode!

Dass Konzertkarten teurer als Kinokarten sind, lässt Hope dagegen nur halb gelten: „Ein Fußballspiel oder ein Rockkonzert können viel mehr kosten!” Ernster nimmt er die kurze Aufmerksamkeitsspanne einer Generation, die mit Musikstücken im Clipformat aufgewachsen ist.

An der Musik selbst liegt’s nicht, dass Konzerte wenig junges Publikum anlocken, hat Hope bei seinen Feldstudien herausgefunden: Die fänden die Hörer von „ganz okay” bis „saugeil”. Das ist doch die Hauptsache.

Verena Fischer-Zernin, Hamburger Abendblatt

Link: http://www.abendblatt.de/kultur-live/article1185718/Hier-klatschen-Sie-richtig.html

My son, the violinist
The Guardian, 21.08.2009

Aged just three, author Christopher Hope’s son decided to be a violinist. Neither of them realised how many strings would be attached…



2007


Impressive player
The Toronto Star, 28.06.2007

… Hope is an impressive player who can be spirited as well as sensitive. His technique is beyond reproach…

By John Terrauds



2006


Masters his instrument
Berliner Zeitung, 29.09.2006

“The way Hope masters his instrument… qualifies him as a musician on a par with Gidon Kremer“

Wie Hope sein Instrument als Individuum versteht… das qualifiziert ihn als Musiker auf dem Niveau eines Gidon Kremer.“

Top-flight interpreter
The Guardian, 28.05.2006

Violinist Daniel Hope may be rapidly establishing himself as a top-flight interpreter of the mainstream repertory – his recordings of concertos by Britten, Berg, and the two by Shostakovich have been much admired. But his musical horizons extend well beyond the norm.

Classics meet bluegrass
Savannah Morning News, 01.04.2006

When Edgar Meyer, Sam Bush, Mike Marshall and Daniel Hope get together to play, they bring a world of experience and diversity with them. Daniel Hope, the Savannah Music Festival’s associate artistic director, is at home with Mozart and Stravinsky; Bush, with pulsating, foot-stomping bluegrass. For decades, Marshall has dipped very deftly into jazz, classical, bluegrass and Brazilian music. And Meyer, who seemingly has collaborated with almost everybody, plays just about everything.

… Hope joined the others for selected cuts from Meyer’s “Short Trip Home“, nominated for a Grammy several years back. Friday night’s performers played with admirable cohesiveness and virtuosity. Hope, (assuming the role Joshua Bell played in the original recording) is, we learned, not only a renowned violinist but also a first-class fiddler, quite as comfortable with folksy ditties as the thorniest passages in Bartok.

… Were we hearing classical? Bluegrass? Or something in between? We didn’t care! The net effect? Everybody, onlookers and performers alike, relaxed and had a splendid time.



2005


Daniel Hope – frighteningly gifted!
The Washington Post, 29.10.2005

Daniel Hope – frighteningly gifted!

Thriving solo career
The New York Times, 28.10.2005

The British violinist Daniel Hope maintains a thriving solo career that has been built on inventive programming and a probing interpretive style.

Hope wins ECHO Klassik Prize, second year running
, 18.08.2005

Daniel Hope has again won the ECHO Klassik prize, Germany’s most important recording award. This is the second consecutive year that Hope carries home the coveted trophy. The award goes to “East meets West”, Hope’s highly successful recording with Gaurav Mazumdar and Sebastian Knauer, which received a Grammy nomination earlier this year.

The ECHO Klassik prize will be awarded at a live televised event in Munich on October 16th. Other 2005 winners include Anna Netrebko, Rolando Villazon, Hélène Grimaud and Daniel Barenboim.

For more info please visit the ECHO Klassik Website or contact:

Tanja Franke
Head of Warner Classics Germany
Alter Wandrahm 14
D-20457 Hamburg
Tel. +49 40 30 339 609
E-Mail: Tanja.Franke@warnermusic.com

Ireland Sonata
BBC Music Magazine, 25.02.2005

Daniel Hope has rapidly made a name for himself as one of the most outstanding young British violinists, and listening to his interpretation of the Ireland Sonata one sees why…



2004


Violinist named as top young classical performer
The Scotsman, 27.05.2004

A BRITISH violinist who first performed on television at the age of ten was named as the top young classical performer yesterday at the age of 29.

Daniel Hope, who has been hailed as the most important British string player since the cellist Jacqueline du Pré, carried off the prize at the fifth annual Classical Brit Awards at the Albert Hall in London.

The Italian opera singer Cecilia Bartoli was named female artist of the year. Hayley Westenra, the teenage sensation from New Zealand, was one of the three nominees, but failed to win the title.

Top male artist of the year went to the Welsh baritone Bryn Terfel. The orchestral album of the year went to Sir Simon Rattle and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra for Beethoven Symphonies.

The composer Phillip Glass’s soundtrack for the film The Hours won the contemporary music award.

The Classical Brit Awards, launched in 2000, have been cast as the classics’ answer to pop talent shows in the search for wider audiences for classical music. They will be broadcast on ITV this weekend.

Previous shows have seen dramatic boosts in the sales of featured performances.

The pop flavour of the evening was captured by the British rock violinist, Singapore-born Vanessa-Mae. The performance also featured Terfel and Renée Fleming singing their first duet, Bess, You Is My Woman Now, from Porgy and Bess, the Gershwin opera.

Fleming, whose recent UK concert tour included an appearance at Edinburgh’s Usher Hall, won the Outstanding Contribution to Music award.

The violinist Nigel Kennedy, Westenra, the Welsh soprano Katherine Jenkins, opera band Amici Forever and the King’s College Choir also performed. While Westenra failed to win as best female artist, her multi-million-selling album, Pure, was in contention for the best album of the year.

The awards, sponsored by National Savings & Investments, are decided by a jury of music industry representatives.

TIM CORNWELL
ARTS CORRESPONDENT

Terfel and Bartoli beat challenge of ‘crossover’ musicians to take top honours at Classical Brits
The Independent, 27.05.2004

Bryn Terfel and Cecilia Bartoli beat a slew of young newcomers to win the best artist gongs at the fifth annual Classical Brit Awards yesterday at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

The Welsh opera singer Terfel also beat several high-profile musicians, including Luciano Pavarotti and Ludovico Einaudi, to win the coveted best album award.

Among those who were disappointed by the results was Hayley Westenra, the 17-year-old from New Zealand who has been called the “new Charlotte Church“. She was nominated for best album and best female artist. Myleene Klass, who began her musical career as a contestant on Pop Stars, was also among those nominated for best album with Moving On.

Other winners at the award ceremony, which was presented by the ITV news newsreader Katie Derham, included the violin virtuoso Daniel Hope in the young British classical performer category and Phillip Glass, who scooped the contemporary music award for his soundtrack to The Hours.

Terfel and and the Rome-born mezzo-soprano Bartoli emerged as the winners at the ceremony, sponsored by National Savings and Investments, despite a proliferation of young performers such as Westenra and Klass receiving nominations for prestigious awards.

Over recent years, a flood of young “populist“ musicians has prompted accusations from classical music purists that the industry is “dumbing down” and “sexing up” due to its cross-fertilisation with pop.

But only two months ago, the growth in “crossover“ classical music was attributed, in part, to reversing the declining sales. Last year, sales of classical albums increased by 8 per cent to 14 million.

For Rob Dickins, the chairman of the Classical Brit Awards, the diversity of performers on the shortlist was a cause for celebration rather than criticism. “The words ‘dumbing down’ are used to refer to every industry these days,“ he told The Independent. “The point of this show is to open as many doors into classical music as we can.

Music is a rich tapestry of colours. Crossover has become an ugly word but it basically refers to a musician who has the ability to make someone who understands pop music to understand classical music.

“It means a bridge between the two and I look at this as a positive development.“

Vanessa-Mae was one of the first classical recording artists to cross over into mainstream music markets withThe Violin Player, released in 1994. She performed at the inaugural Classical Brit Awards in 2000.

The accolade for Bartoli crowns a high point for the 37-year-old bel canto specialist who recorded an album of arias by Antono Salieri – cast as Mozart’s enemy in the film Amadeus – in London last December. Last year, she was also voted the most popular classical performer at the Gramophone Awards, marking her fourth Grammy in a career spanning 15 years.

Despite the appeal of musicians such as Westenra and Klass, the announcement of the best female and male artist awards came as little surprise, said Mr Dickins. “Bryn [Terfel] is a very serious artist who has simply extended his repertoire,“ he said. “If you are a baritone or a bass, your repertoire is fairly fixed and you do reach a limit in terms of the core classical. And we are not surprised at Cecilia [Bartoli] winning… She is clearly Olympic gold.“

Other winners included Sir Simon Rattle, who won the ensemble/orchestral album of the year award with Beethoven Symphonies and the soprano Renée Fleming, who was awarded the prize for outstanding contribution to music.

AWARD WINNERS

Album of the Year

Bryn Terfel, Bryn, Deutsche Grammaphon/Universal

(Runners-up: Aled Jones, Higher, UCJ/Universal; Amici Forever, The Opera Band, Arista/BMG; Denise Leigh/Jane Gilchrist, Operatunity, EMI Classics; Dominic Miller, Shapes, BBC Music; Hayley Westenra, Pure, Decca/Universal; Lesley Garrett, So Deep Is The Night, EMI Classics; Luciano Pavarotti, Ti Adoro, Decca/Universal; Ludovico Einaudi, Echoes – The Collection, BMG; Myleene Klass, Moving On, UCJ/Universal

Young British Classical Performer

Daniel Hope, Nimbus

(Runners-up: Catrin Finch, Sony Classics; Colin Currie, EMI Classics)

Female Artist of the Year

Cecilia Bartoli, Decca/Universal

(Runners-up: Hayley Westenra, Decca/Universal; Marin Alsop, Naxos / Select Music)

Male Artist of the Year

Bryn Terfel, Deutsche Grammaphon/Universal

(Runners-up: Sir Colin Davis LSO/Harmonia Mundi ; Nigel Kennedy EMI Classics)

Contemporary Music award

Phillip Glass, The Hours, Nonesuch/Warner Classics

(Runners-up: Gidon Kremer, Happy Birthday, Nonesuch/Warner Classics; John Rutter, Distant Land, UCJ/Universal)

Ensemble/Orchestral Album of the Year

Sir Simon Rattle/VPO, Beethoven Symphonies, EMI Classics

(Runners-up: John Rutter/RPO, Distant Land, UCJ/Universal; New College Oxford Choir/Higginbottom, Bach, St John Passion, Naxos/Select Music)

Critics’ Award

Maxim Vengerov/LSO/ Rostropovitch, Britten/Walton, EMI Classics

(Runners-up: LSO/Jansons, Mahler/Symphony no 6; LSO, Harmonia Mundi; Rattle/VPO, Beethoven Symphonies, EMI Classics

Outstanding Contribution to Music

Renée Fleming

The day Menuhin said sorry
The Daily Telegraph, 27.05.2004

Last night, violinist Daniel Hope won Best Young Performer at the Classical Brits. He talks to Peter Culshaw about growing up around the inspirational – and infuriating – Yehudi Menuhin.

The young violinist Daniel Hope is being touted as one of the most exciting British instrumentalists to emerge for many years. The Boston Globe went so far as to suggest that he might be the most important string player since Jacqueline du Pré. His recent record of Berg and Britten violin concertos, hardly the easiest of listens, was record of the week in nearly all the broadsheets, and last night he won a Classical Brit award for best young classical performer of the year at a glossy event at the Albert Hall.

Early promise: Daniel Hope

He explains to me, when I meet him in New York before a concert of the revered Beaux Arts Trio (of which he is the youngest ever member) that he owes much of his success to being brought up in the household of Yehudi Menuhin. Hope’s mother was successively his secretary, agent and then manager.

In fact, it was an unlikely twist of fate that his mother ended up working for Menuhin at all.

“It was just complete luck. She had three interviews that day. One was to work for the Archbishop of Canterbury, one was for a stockbroker and one was for Menuhin. She didn’t get the first two, so she went to the other one. I’m absolutely sure I wouldn’t have become a musician if that hadn’t happened.“

Surrounded by “the most beautiful music“ from infancy, it was not entirely surprising that Hope, now 29, announced at the age of three that he wanted to be a violinist. “Apparently, I kicked and shouted until they gave in and arranged some lessons, although they thought it was a crazy whim. My mother wanted me to do anything else – at one point she suggested I might become a plumber.“

Menuhin himself also thought his enthusiasm was nothing serious, as Hope explains. “It took many years for him to change his opinion. It was only when I started studying with Zakhar Bron, whom Menuhin admired a lot, that he started to get interested. When I was 16 he asked me to come and play for him, having not heard me for perhaps six years.“ Menuhin, he says, apologised for ignoring him and suggested they work together. “I think it was a mixture of shock and, I think, pride as well. When he said we could work together I thought he meant take some lessons, but he wanted me to perform some concertos, which we took on tour. It was unbelievable.“

And how did he find Menuhin as a person? “He was generous, warm-hearted and original. Not to mention infuriating. He had opinions on everything from electric cars to world peace.“

Hope’s next major project is an album called East Meets West, which will include compositions by Ravi Shankar that were performed originally by Mehuhin in the 1960s. While Hope is too young to recall their original recordings, he was there when the two men met and performed subsequently, often when Menuhin was in Switzerland for the summer.

“It was quite a sight to see them performing sitting on the lawn in full dress with the mountains in the background. I have never forgotten listening to the music they made“.

Hope is keen to assure me East Meets West is no cross-over gimmick, but something he has prepared for over a considerable period.

“I’d asked Menuhin whether he would mind if someone did this music again and he said, on the contrary, but you are really going to have to work at it. I ended up doing a crash course in Indian music for two and a half years.“

The demos of the album suggest an effective interplay of idioms, particularly between the sitar of Gaurav Mazumdar (whom Shankar recommended) and Hope’s sinuous violin. The rest of the album features other cultural collisions between the orient and the West – from Ravel’s gypsy Tzigane to Bartók’s Romanian folk dances.

A curiosity of the album is the reintroduction of an instrument developed by Ravel in the 1920s called the lutheal: “It’s a bizarre-looking thing halfway between a typewriter and an organ which is attached to the strings of a piano and enables you to get unbelievable sounds that you would never normally get on a piano – from harp sounds to something between a harpsichord and a fortepiano.“

Hope’s own violin-playing also shows a mixture of styles – there’s a lyricism reminiscent of Menuhin but also a more passionate, Russian-tinged element that he got from his teachers Felix Andrievsky at the Royal College and Zakhar Bron. “Bron was a student of David Oistrakh, who to me was the god of violinists. I became fascinated by that approach to playing that goes back to a very old tradition in Russia.“

A characteristic of Hope’s is a love of an idea or intellectual concept as a peg for a recording, which he enjoys researching. An earlier disc, Forbidden, Not Forgotten, featured music composed by the doomed musicians in the Theresienstadt ghetto in the Second World War. He has experimented with music and the spoken word, having set a play of his father’s to music and recently produced and written the text for an evening of Beethoven that included Mia Farrow as the composer’s maid.

What next? The Four Seasons, perhaps? “I play it in concert, but can’t see any point in recording it.“ This is his chance, I tell him, to dethrone Nigel Kennedy, that other Menuhin protégé. “I wouldn’t want to do that. I mean, I have a lot of respect for the things he’s done, like the Walton Concerto.“

“On the other hand,“ he says, “he may have become trapped in his punk persona. And I certainly can’t see any point in doing the Four Seasons twice.“

He tells me that, every time he gets in a cab in London with his violin, the driver asks him if he knows Kennedy. “But hats off to him. He’s an extremely talented fiddle player.“

So it may not be duelling violins at dawn just yet, but would Hope like Kennedy’s level of fame? “I’m happy if I can play Beethoven one day and something like Ravi Shankar’s music the next. It is nice to sell records but it really wouldn’t bother me one way or the other whether I get recognised by people or not.“

Daniel Hope’s recording of the Berg and Britten violin concertos is on Warner Classics. ‘East Meet West’ will be released in September. The Beaux Arts Trio plays at the Bath Assembly Rooms on June 6.



2003


Violinist’s chair
The Berkshire Eagle, 25.10.2003

Just as a new actor in a play can change the character of the production, a new musician can transform the way a chamber ensemble plays. A recent example was the replacement of Robert Mann, the founding first violinist of the Juilliard String Quartet, by Joel Smirnoff. A more homogeneous playing style ensued.

Something of the same thing has happened to the Beaux Arts Trio with the accession of Daniel Hope to the violinist’s chair. Hope, a fine musician whose passions burn with a controlled warmth, brings elegance to the mix. Like silver, he brings out the best colors in his surroundings.

Western classical musicians
Evening Standard, 25.06.2003

We now have some Western classical musicians – like Daniel Hope – who have real empathy and understanding for Indian music.



2002


A magnificent sound
The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 25.06.2002

“Hope’s tone relies less on brilliance, more on inner balance, his vibrato unbelievably flexible and a magnificent sound without the slightest trace of kitsch……this is simply astonishing violinist ability and musical intelligence.”

Very skillful instrumentalist
The Boston Globe, 25.03.2002

Hope, touted as the most important British string player since Jacqueline du Pre, is a very skillful instrumentalist with exceptionally refined musical impulses. His tone remains beautiful, and dead in tune…



2001


If he’d dreamt it himself
The Independent, 25.01.2001

Hard on the heels of Maxim Vengerov’s superb Teldec recording of Elgar’s Violin Sonata comes a thought-provoking Nimbus rival from Daniel Hope, more inward-looking than Vengerov though no less heart-rending, and with more appropriate couplings.

Hope negotiates each sighing phrase as if he’d dreamt it himself. But there’s another, more significant perspective to his performance, specifically in the movement that the composer described as “fantastic” and “curious“… where the score’s darker side registers as never before. Hope’s annotations are as compelling as his performances, and the rest of his programme conjures parallel strains of wistfulness… the Walton, commissioned and recorded by Menuhin, is one of the great 20th-century British duo sonatas, and this is surely its finest modern recording to date.



2000


Wonderful works
Münchener Abendzeitung (en), 30.08.2000

A very brave violinist: to record an all 20th-Century violin programme requires courage… the young Englishman Daniel Hope – who recently replaced Nigel Kennedy in an open-air concert in Munich – possesses not only this courage, but also gets right to the heart of these wonderful works.

Such supremacy
Fonoforum, 25.08.2000

One has to award full marks to Hope in all areas… he masters everything with such supremacy… everything is exactly in its place. As many good young violinists as there are today – the name of Daniel Hope should be especially noted.



1999


Brilliant CD-Debut
RONDO Magazine, 26.12.1999

Thomas Schulz chooses:
1999 Artist/Ensemble of the Year : “Daniel Hope, for his brilliant CD-Debut of contemporary violin concertos.“

Young Artist of the Year
FONOFORUM Magazine, 25.12.1999

Jörg Hillebrandt chooses: DANIEL HOPE – as “1999 Young Artist of the Year“.

“Daniel Hope … whose artistic strength and intelligent choice of programming one can rely on.“

HOPE has long been fulfilled
MUSIC MANUAL Magazine, 25.08.1999

Today we have Bartoli, Larmore, Podles and especially Kasarova … and then there is someone else who is currently being propelled into the market: Daniel Hope, pupil and colleague of Yehudi Menuhin.

He has just released his Debut-CD (Nimbus) which clearly stands out in its choice of programme. After a first-hearing of Hope’s recording one is almost voracious to hear what he will record next, equally the standard as well as newly discovered repertoire. There are still those today who can match the great ‘legends’. For example him, there is Hope, and HOPE has long been fulfilled!

He who dares wins
FONOFORUM Magazine, 25.07.1999

No Mendelssohn, no Bruch and no Tchaikovsky – to dedicate a Debut CD entirely to 20th century works requires courage and huge confidence in one’s own ability. And not least a label who believes in the artist and who is prepared to take risks. This is the combination present on Daniel Hope’s première disc … Hope has proved himself consistently on stage, and now similarly in the recording studio, boasting a daredevil violinistic ability that at no point leaves us in any doubt. His commitment to new music has been authoritatively inspired through personal contact with composers such as Takemitsu and Schnittke, which adds even more to the appeal of this recording.

Takemitsu’s Nostalghia was authorized by the composer … Hope brings out its many facets with a slim, colourful tone. And Schnittke’s polystylicsm …  is grasped by soloist, conductor and orchestra with a winning, clear-cut precision. With Weill’s Violin Concerto, Hope is up against the excellent recordings by Tetzlaff (Virgin) and Frank Peter Zimmermann (EMI), and need not worry about any comparison. The further development of this violinist should be followed closely…

20th-century musical avantgarde
The Philadelphia Inquirer, 27.06.1999

Pick of the week: The 25-year-old Brit with a lusty tone makes a serious and seriously impressive recording debut with four works with four distinct views of dissonance. Hope chose worthy and under-performed pieces that, taken as a group, make a friendly and powerful statement about the 20th-century musical avantgarde.

Totally in sympathy
Classical Music Web, 26.06.1999

This appears to be the recording debut of the violinist, Daniel Hope. He is to be congratulated for the enterprising choice of music. No Mendelssohn/Bruch launch for him! He seems totally in sympathy with the music: dedicated and dazzling whether in virtuosity or in poetic sensitivity.

Talented young violinist
RONDO Magazine, 24.06.1999

What a relief: a highly talented young violinist, who on his first CD presents not the umpteenth interpretation of the Beethoven or Brahms concertos, but instead unknown works from our century.

Daniel Hope, born in England in 1974, possesses not only a stupendous technique, but also the creative intelligence necessary to bring off Kurt Weill’s drole Violin Concerto. The bitter charm of this work … is exactly right in Hope’s hands. His tone is slim but has at the same time huge warmth, also avoiding any trace of sentimentality. The works by Schnittke and Takemitsu have an added authenticity through the personal contact between Hope and both composers. In particular Takemitsu’s Nostalghia … captivates us through its deep expressiveness and, true to its title, almost nostalgic beauty. Not an everyday release, in return all the more rewarding.

Especially recommended.

Highly recommended
The San Franciso Examiner, 24.05.1999

Daniel Hope, now 25, boasts a background as a prodigy (he was discovered at 10 by renowned bassist Gary Karr), but, on the evidence here, he has developed into a mature artist who is profoundly committed to the finer music of his own time.

The music, rather than the musician, is served on this exceptionally valuable collection. Hope yields to no violinist in his expressive intensity … and Toru Takemitsu’s lyrical tribute to film director Andrei Takovksy receives and exquisite rendering here, one of the Japanese composer’s most beautiful utterances.

Highly recommended.

Eloquently focused performance
BBC Music Magazine, 27.04.1999

In their various ways, all four pieces live on an expressive edge, and admirably showcase the considerable talents of young violinist, Daniel Hope. Hope finds much poetry, as well as bitter with … an eloquently focused performance.

Takemitsu himself praised Hope’s interpretation of Nostalghia. Hope’s account, more spacious than Otto Derloez, seems well-nigh definitive. Altogether an impressive release, thoughtfully planned and documented, the recording excellently balanced.

***** (5 Stars) Performance

***** (5 Stars) Sound

Safe in his hands…
BBC Music Magazine, 26.04.1999

…a champion of the comtemporary violin:

The remarkable new talent of British violinist Daniel Hope has been launched skyward with a debut recording…

Hope has undoubtedly gained invaluable insights into both Schnittke’s personality and his music … the future of the contemporary violin is indeed safe in his hands.

Hope’s magical sustaining
The Straud Magazine, 25.04.1999

The Straud Magazine

Extremely enterprising
Classic CD Magazine, 24.04.1999

Daniel Hope is clearly a name to watch. His debut recording is not only extremely enterprising … but already reveals a wide range of musical awareness. Hope finds much poetry … the performance is just as compelling as that given by Spivakov.

Highly enterprising debut disc betokening a major new talent.

***** (5 Stars) Performance

***** (5 Stars) Sound



1995


Remember the name
Independent on Sunday, 25.01.1995

An exceptional soloist – the young star violinist Daniel Hope, who is already launched on a major professional career, real lyrical gifts and an enviably fluent technique. Remember the name.



Articles

2016


My mentor Yehudi Menuhin: ‘I can still hear his beautiful sound’
The Guardian, 29.03.2016

For the centenary of the great violinist’s birth, Daniel Hope, his protege from the age of two, remembers their life on the road – including the time his priceless violin, nicknamed Lord Wilton, went missing.

 

Yehudi Menuhin used to say that I fell into his lap as a baby. Life in 1970s South Africa had become intolerable for my parents, thanks to the apartheid regime. We lived in Durban, where my father co-founded the literary magazine Bolt, publishing poems by writers of many races. From that moment on, his phone was tapped and they were under permanent surveillance. They had no option but to leave the country. My father was only offered an exit permit. This meant you could leave but never return.

They settled in London, where very soon their money ran out. We had nowhere to go. My father, Christopher Hope, was a struggling author. He went on to win the Whitbread Prize, but back then anti-South African sentiment in the UK made it very hard for him to find work, even though he was fiercely anti-apartheid. My mother supported us with part-time secretarial jobs. At the 11th hour, facing calamity, we had some incredible luck. An employment agency offered her a compelling choice of jobs: secretary to either the Archbishop of Canterbury or the violinist Yehudi Menuhin. She had no musical training, but she loved music and admired Menuhin, whom she had heard perform in South Africa.

Coincidentally, my parents had also heard the then-Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Coggan, preach in South Africa and had been shocked that he did not actively denounce apartheid – so she would never have taken the job with him. The interview with Menuhin lasted two minutes. He asked if she knew the difference between Beethoven and Bach. When she said yes, he asked: “When can you start?” My mother’s association with Menuhin lasted 24 years, right up until his death in 1999.

Our lives changed immediately and for ever. I was two and, for the next eight years, practically grew up in Menuhin’s house in Highgate, London, where my mother would take me to play while she worked. Although we had only just settled in London, Menuhin asked her to come to his summer festival in Gstaad for two months. Her concerns at leaving her family were swept aside. “I would never separate a mother from her family,” Menuhin said. “Bring everyone with you.” And that’s what she did.

I was a kid who could never sit still, so my mother was very surprised to see me silent on the hard pew of the church where rehearsals took place, intent on the music. I was surrounded by artists of all kinds, so in a way it was no surprise when I announced to my parents at the age of four that I wanted to become a Violinist.

The violin was a part of Menuhin. To this day, his sound remains in my ear, so unique and so fascinatingly beautiful. He’d leave his Guarneri del Gesù, a priceless violin made in 1742 and known as the “Lord Wilton”, in an open case on the table; he never put it away. He picked it up and played it almost as if he were drinking a glass of water. He once told me: “One has to play every day. One is like a bird, and can you imagine a bird saying, ‘I’m tired today – I don’t feel like flying’?”

How do I begin to summarise a career that spanned 75 years and made him one of the greatest musicians in history? Perhaps with his debut in 1924 in San Francisco at the age of seven, or maybe his performance in Berlin in 1929, which prompted Albert Einstein to exclaim: “Now I know there is a God in heaven!” Or his legendary recording of the Elgar concerto under the composer’s own baton in 1932. Then there’s his visit to the liberated concentration camp of Bergen-Belsen with Benjamin Britten in 1945; and his highly controversial decision to return to Germany in 1947, where he performed with Wilhelm Furtwängler and the Berlin Philharmonic, the first Jewish artist after the war to do so.

Only seven of Menuhin’s 82 years were not spent on the road. He adored playing and travelling. His wife almost always accompanied him, his children less so. Musically, I learned from him constantly, just happy to have the chance of observing him close up. But it was also testing – an education in the fierce, peripatetic life of the soloist and the kaleidoscopic world of hotels, stages, airports and orchestras they inhabit. The cities to which I was introduced delighted and alarmed in equal measure. Menuhin had been on the road since he was still in shorts, though, and was an expert.

Along with a gentleness that masked an iron will, Menuhin’s humour was inexhaustible. On one occasion, my father was entrusted with taking his Guarneri del Gesù on an Alitalia flight to Rome. Menuhin was at the front of the plane and went straight to the VIP room. When we got to passport control at Fiumicino airport, I asked my father where the violin was. My father looked at me with shock and came out with an expletive. He had left the violin in the baggage compartment on the plane. He ran like an Olympic sprinter back on to the runway and up the stairs of the aircraft – you could do that in those days. When Menuhin heard about the incident, he giggled like a little boy. Thanks to some kind carabinieri, he got his violin back after a tense half-hour – tense for my father, anyway.

I had a few lessons from him as a very young boy, but our real collaboration began when I was 16. By that stage, I had had my own teachers, in particular the great Russian pedagogue Zakhar Bron. Menuhin was curious to see what Bron had been able to achieve with the “boy next door”. His reaction was a mixture of shock and delight, and he suggested we perform together. Over the next 10 years, we played more than 60 concerts around the world: I played, he conducted. The works included Mendelssohn’s early D minor Concerto, which Menuhin famously discovered in 1951, and also many works for two violins, such as the A minor Double Concerto by Vivaldi.

On 7 March 1999, I played Alfred Schnittke’s Concerto in Düsseldorf, conducted by Menuhin. It was to be his final concert. After the Schnittke, Menuhin encouraged me to play an encore. I spontaneously chose Kaddish, Ravel’s musical version of the Jewish prayer for the dead. I had grown up on Menuhin’s interpretation of this work and wanted to dedicate it to him. Menuhin pushed me out on to the stage and sat among the orchestra listening to it. Five days later, he passed away.

Daniel Hope’s album My Tribute to Yehudi Menuhin is out now on Deutsche Grammophon. The Menuhin Competition takes place at venues across London from 7 to 17 April.

 

How European exile composers created the sounds of Hollywood
Deutsche Welle, 16.03.2016

World-renowned violinist Daniel Hope uncovered dusty letters and compositions scribbled on scraps of paper for “The Sounds of Hollywood,” a book and a CD on Jewish immigrant composers who fled to Hollywood in the 1930s.

 

Born in South Africa in 1973, Daniel Hope was raised in England. Yet the violinist has long been curious about his Jewish family, which traces its roots back to Berlin. Fifteen years ago, Hope began to dig more deeply into the biographies of Jewish musicians, especially composers of German and Austrian heritage who migrated to Hollywood. The list was long: Friedrich Hollaender, Erich Korngold, Franz Wachsmann, Max Steiner, Werner Richard Heymann.

His original aim was to uncover music pieces for a new CD recording but it quickly became clear that he’d hit upon an entirely new project. Much as a cultural archaeologist might do, Hope delved into the biographies, archives and personal estates of the artists. Curious, he followed the trail of the immigrants through Hollywood, interviewing their children, grandchildren and surviving relatives. Extensive archives at Paramount Studios in Hollywood turned up an unbelievable treasury filled with hand-written correspondence, scored notes, letters.

“I have read a lot about this period. But it’s quite different to go into these archives and open old, dusty boxes,” Hope said of his time spent with the composers’ history. “Suddenly, you’re sitting there with Erich Korngold’s notes scribbled on a napkin, composing a Viennese Waltz, crossing it out and then recomposing it. You get the feeling at that moment that you’ve really stepped back in time.”

In researching his latest book, “Sounds of Hollywood” (available in German only for now) and the CD of the same name, Hope took an important trip back in time. With the knowledge of each composer’s unique destiny in mind, Hope could make the emotional connection to the music, he told DW in an interview. “There’s quite a bit of melancholy in the music of these emigrants, and a lot of nostalgia.”

 

The talkie boom

There was a substantial need for film composers in Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s, as the film industry was booming thanks to the advent of the talkie. Some film productions could be likened to an assembly line and studio heads traveled frequently to Europe to acquire the talents – the best of the best.

“They put out their antenna and found Kurt Weill, Hanns Eisler and all of the other great composers who already had an audience and had seen success in Europe,” said Hope.

“These emigrants brought with them the musical offerings by composers like Gustav Mahler and Richard Wagner. They delivered exactly what the studio bosses in Hollywood wanted them to bring: the great, the epic, the symphonic,” he said. The opulent orchestral sounds that we still hear in big Hollywood films today can be traced back to this time.

In his research, Daniel Hope has found parallels to the refugee crisis currently happening in Europe. “It’s not as if Hollywood was standing there with open arms, waiting to receive the migrants and refugees from Europe,” Hope said, alluding to the intense competition within the film industry. “Many of these very talented composers weren’t even named in the credits. They sat together as a group of eight or nine working on a film and delivered every so often a phrase.”

Only the rare immigrant had already made a name for himself that he could use to gain work in the booming film industry. Arnold Schönberg and Igor Stravinsky got generous offers from the West Coast. “But they both turned down the chance to work in the film industry or were themselves turned down because they had completely different ideas about music than the American film producers had,” according to Hope.

 

Hollywood’s information exchange

Schönberg, who developed dodecaphonic music, found the world of film soundtracks fascinating, highly appealing. But he had trouble with the American studio philosophy, which degraded composers as it positioned them as mere service providers, Hope uncovered. “Schönberg wasn’t ready to give up complete creative control, control over his music was used in the direction. As a result, he realized very quickly that it wasn’t something for him.”

The exchange between those who created culture and the European immigrants was lively. Meetings over a Wiener schnitzel or a round of Berlin-style meatballs wasn’t unheard of as the men tried to carry on the coffeehouse traditions of Vienna and Berlin in Hollywood. And in doing so, lots of information was exchanged, from mere gossip to important news about the immigration authorities and current job offers.

The infamous Villa Aurora, where novelist Lion Feuchtwanger and his wife Martha lived, became something of a meeting point, a reception center for those newly emigrated. “He considered himself as something like a godfather to these ‘artists in exile’,” said Hope. In addition to the immigrants, a number of famous actors and personalities, including Charlie Chaplin, came to the villa to meet.

 

A struggle to survive

The majority of the European immigrants who arrived in Hollywood never came into contact with the glamorous side of the film industry. Many struggled to even scrape by, and worried about a lack of money to even cover their basic needs like clothing, rent and food. Most of them had to leave Nazi Germany virtually overnight after Hitler came to power in 1933, leaving everything behind. Daniel Hope stumbled upon moving stories that took place behind Hollywood’s glitzy façade.

Success as a film composer in the US had other downsides as well and could completely destroy an ambitious composer with dreams of recognition. Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who was much celebrated in Europe as a musical wunderkind, never felt accepted or at home in the USA – despite his greatest successes. Korngold won two Oscars for his film soundtracks.

“He was no longer recognized as a serious composer in the classical world and was no longer accepted there,” says Hope. Korngold was accused of having sold his soul. Thomas Mann, himself an immigrant, spoke of so-called “Movie riff-raff.” Film music was considered second- or third-class.

“That’s a bitter pill to swallow,” says Daniel Hope. “These were men who had enormous talent and unbelievable composition skills, who had to struggle to find a way during an emergency situation. Yet they were persecuted for their work in film. That’s a real tragedy.”

Author Heike Mund



2015


Der Geiger Daniel Hope legt die europäischen Wurzeln des “Sound of Hollywood” bloß
Dresdner Neueste Nachrichten, 02.11.2015

Hölle oder Paradies
Der Geiger Daniel Hope legt die europäischen Wurzeln des “Sound of Hollywood” bloß
Von Frauke Kaberka

Was wären “Vom Winde verweht”, “Der weiße Hai” oder “Titanic” ohne ihren Sound? Filmmusik hat sich längst einen besonderen Status als eigenständige Kunstform erarbeitet. Insbesondere Melodien aus Hollywoodproduktionen werden gern in Konzerten gespielt und sind fester Bestandteil von Rundfunkunterhaltungsprogrammen. Nicht jedem aber ist bekannt, dass ihre Wurzeln in Europa liegen. Konkret waren es vor allem jüdische Künstler, die in den ersten Jahrzehnten des 20. Jahrhunderts nach Amerika zogen, um sich in der kalifornischen Traumfabrik eine neue Existenz aufzubauen. Daniel Hope, ein Weltstar unter den Geigern, hat sich auf Spurensuche begeben und mit dem Journalisten Wolfgang Knauer darüber ein informatives Buch verfasst, das eine hochaktuelle Botschaft hat. “Sounds of Hollywood” ist mehr als ein Blick auf die Filmmusikgeschichte aus Hollywood.

Es war im November 2013, als der 1974 in Südafrika geborene Musiker bei einem Sonderkonzert in Berlin auftrat –  zum Gedenken an Künstler, deren Karrieren und Leben vor 75 Jahren nicht nur bedroht, sondern oft auch zerstört  wurden. Mit der Reichspogromnacht begann in Deutschland und dann auch in weiten Teilen Europas die “Entjudung”. Das Konzert am Brandenburger Tor unter dem Motto “Tausend Stimmen für die Vielfalt” wurde untermalt mit großen Bildprojektionen von eben jenen Künstlern, die über Nacht ihre Heimat verlassen mussten. Hope hatte sich bereits vorher mit diesen Menschen und ihrem Schicksal befasst, denn es ist auch das Schicksal seiner Familie. Nun wollte er mehr wissen, ihren Weg nachvollziehen, den sie in der Fremde gingen. Und viele dieser Weg führten über den Atlantik nach Hollywood.

Die aufblühende Filmwirtschaft verhieß nicht nur emigrierten Musikern Sicherheit und Arbeit. Wissenschaftler, Schriftsteller und Dichter, Regisseure und Schauspieler strandeten ebenfalls zuhauf an den südkalifornischen Gestaden, darunter Bertolt Brecht, Lion Feuchtwanger, Franz Werfel, Max Reinhardt, Billy Wilder und viele andere. Doch weder für sie noch für viele Exil-Musiker war es ein leichter Neubeginn. Manche schafften es nie, denn Hollywood wurde mit Emigranten überschwemmt, und Arbeit gab es nicht genug. Zudem fanden einige überhaupt keinen Bezug zum Exil und zum Medium Film, wie Reinhardt, Brecht oder der Komponist Arnold Schönberg. Für Bert Brecht war Hollywood die “Hölle”, für Schönberg hingegen die “Vertreibung ins Paradies”. Einige der Komponisten, deren Spuren Hope folgte, konnten sich trotz großer Erfolge nie mit Hollywood anfreunden, so Erich Wolfgang Korngold, der lieber nur “ernsthafte” Musik geschrieben hätte. Andere wie Max Steiner, der “Vater der Filmmusik”, und auch der jüngere André Previn hingegen hatten ihr Metier gefunden.

Hope, der sich nicht nur durch die Literatur über die berühmten Musiker arbeitete, sondern auch mit ihnen (Previn), Angehörigen (Schönberg) oder Freunden und Kollegen sprach, trug so für sein Buch auch Anekdoten, Bonmots und zudem ein wenig Klatsch zusammen, was den Unterhaltungswert der flott und locker geschriebenen Lektüre sicherlich steigert.

Dass der Geiger den ernsten Hintergrund seiner Recherche dabei nicht aus den Augen lässt, macht das Buch angesichts eines wieder zunehmenden Antisemitismus und einer nicht zu ignorierenden aufkeimenden Fremdenfeindlichkeit besonders wichtig. “Als Angehöriger einer Familie, die in der Nazi-Zeit das Schicksal der Vertreibung erlitten hat, empfinde ich solche Anzeichen als alarmierend”, schreibt Hope. “Umso entschiedener engagiere ich mich für den Ruf nach Toleranz, der bei jenem Konzert am Brandenburger Tor zu vernehmen war, als die Musik derer gespielt wurde, die Opfer der Intoleranz wurden.” Doch er sehe in den Erfolgen jener Menschen im fernen Amerika, die Bahnbrechendes zuwege gebracht hätten, auch einen Funken Hoffnung, “der Mut auf eine bessere Zukunft macht”.
Daniel Hope und Wolfgang Knauer: Sounds of Hollywood. Wie Emigranten aus Europa die amerikanische Filmmusik erfanden, Rowohlt Verlag, 336 Seiten, 19,95 Euro

Überleben in Hollywood
Südwest Presse, 22.08.2015

“Robin Hood hat mir das Leben gerettet”, hat Erich Wolfgang Korngold einmal gesagt.

Der Komponist war für seinen schwarzen Humor berüchtigt, aber dies war kein lockerer Spruch: Nur sechs Wochen vor dem Einmarsch deutscher Truppen in Österreich 1938 folgte Korngold dem Ruf aus Kalifornien, den Soundtrack für den Errol-Flynn-Streifen “König der Vagabunden” zu schreiben. Korngold, der schon zuvor in Hollywood einige Filme vertont hatte, gewann dafür seinen zweiten Oscar – und blieb in den USA, was eben wohl sein Leben rettete.

Denn Korngold war Jude, und seine Geschichte ist eine von vielen, die Star-Geiger Daniel Hope (mit dem Journalisten Wolfgang Knauer) in dem Buch “Sounds of Hollywood” erzählt. “Wie europäische Emigranten die amerikanische Filmmusik erfanden”, lautet der Untertitel. 2014 hat Hope die CD “Escape to Paradise”, eine etwas heterogene, zuweilen sentimental klingende Reise in die Filmmusikwelt vorgelegt – das Buch hängt mit dem Album eng zusammen.

Hope erinnert an eine finstere Epoche: Wie von 1933 an eine kulturelle Blütezeit brutal beendet wurde, wie die Nazis auch im Kulturbetrieb Juden verfolgten. “Morgen muss ich fort von hier”, hieß die letzte Platte der Comedian Harmonists, die eben noch gefeiert wurden, nun Auftrittsverbot hatten.

Fort von hier: Für die Regisseure, Autoren, Musiker und andere Filmschaffende, denen es noch gelang, Deutschland zu verlassen, war Hollywood ein ersehntes Ziel, ein Versprechen. Für Komponisten war die fremde Sprache ein weniger gravierendes Problem wie für andere. Tatsächlich ist die Reihe derer, die – wie Hope belegt – “dank brillanter Einfälle, großem handwerklichen Können und professioneller Erfahrung” ihren Weg machten und auf Hollywood klingenden Einfluss nahmen, bemerkenswert lang. Hope erzählt von Korngold, der vom Wiener Wunderkind zum Hollywood-Meister wurde und dort doch nie ganz glücklich; von Max Steiner, dem “Vater der Filmmusik”; von Friedrich Holländer und Werner Richard Heymann, von Franz Wachsmann und Kurt Weill, der freilich erst am Broadway sein Glück fand.

Für viele ging der Traum einer neuen Karriere allerdings nicht in Erfüllung. Hope vergisst sie nicht, er erzählt von Hanns Eislers Scheitern, von Komponisten wie Erich Zeisl, die nur noch Fußnoten in der Musikgeschichte sind. In Hopes Buch erwacht dabei die Hollywood-Gesellschaft der Exilanten wieder zu Leben, man begegnet Arnold Schönberg und Alma Werfel-Mahler, Thomas Mann, Bertolt Brecht und Bruno Walter.

Recherchen und Reportagen, Gespräche und Anekdoten, Ausflüge auf Friedhöfe und in Archive: Hope schreibt mit Empathie, die Wurzeln des englisch-südafrikanischen Musikers (über die er in “Familienstücke” berichtet hat) liegen in Berlin, auch seine Familiengeschichte ist eine Emigrantengeschichte.

Und er ist ein Musik-Botschafter. Mit seinem Buch will er zeigen, wie viel einst verloren ging, als Künstler vertrieben wurden, weil sie Juden waren. Tröstlich bleibt nur, schreibt er, dass einigen ein neuer Anfang gelang und sie in der Fremde Anerkennung fanden – nicht zuletzt in Hollywood, dessen Klang sie prägten.

‘Träume in Musik’ – BUCH-TIPP
OSTTHÜRINGER ZEITUNG, 10.08.2015

Annerose Kirchner über “Sounds of Hollywood” , verfasst von Stargeiger Daniel Hope

“Die Filmfabrik von Hollywood war der große Traum für viele der zwischen 1933 und 1944 aus Nazideutschland und Österreich geflohenen Künstler. Doch nicht für jeden öffnete sich die Tür zu den Studios. Wer Vielseitigkeit bot wie der Komponist Friedrich Hollaender, der auch als Textdichter, Kabarettist, Revue-Produzent und Musiker seine Kreativität unter Beweis stellte, hatte es leichter.
Sein Schicksal ist nur eines von vielen, das der aus Durban/Südafrika stammende Stargeiger Daniel Hope in seinem Buch “Sounds of Hollywood. Wie Emigranten aus Europa die amerikanische Filmmusik erfanden” (Rowohlt Verlag) aufgreift. Er reiste nach Hollywood, besuchte Schauplätze und traf Zeitzeugen, wie den in Los Angeles geborenen Sohn des Komponisten Arnold Schönberg. Dessen Vater konnte sich nicht für das Filmgeschäft begeistern, vermittelte aber als Lehrer wichtige Impulse.
Komponisten wie Max Steiner ( King Kong ), Erich Wolfgang Korngold ( Captain Blood ) oder Miklós Rózsa ( Ben Hur ) begeisterten das Publikum mit opulenten Orchesterklängen und fulminanten Sounds. Das war neu in den USA und beeinflusste die Musikwelt bis heute. Daniel Hope erinnert auch an das Netzwerk der Exilanten um die Schriftsteller Thomas Mann und Lion Feuchtwanger. Seine Recherchen verbindet er mit der eigenen Familiengeschichte und den jüdischen Vorfahren, die in Berlin lebten.
Hope zeigt auf, was verloren ging in schrecklichen Zeiten und welche Kulturvielfalt in der Emigration neu entstehen konnte. Vor allem wirbt er für Toleranz und Mitmenschlichkeit.”

Der coole Schritt ins 21. Jahrhundert
Limmattaler Zeitung, 29.04.2015

Stargeiger Daniel Hope wird Musikdirektor beim Zürcher Kammerorchester.

Endlich, nach dem offiziellen Teil der gestrigen Programmpräsentation liess Direktor Michael Bühler die Bombe platzen: Daniel Hope ist der neue Music Director des traditionsreichen Zürcher Kammerorchesters. Wussten wir das nicht schon, fragen Sie sich jetzt. Gewiss: In dieser Zeitung stand am 29. Januar: «Wird bald ein Geiger das Zürcher Kammerorchester leiten? Vielleicht gar Daniel Hope?» Und der «Tages-Anzeiger» plapperte die Neuigkeit einige Wochen später nach. Jetzt ist es offiziell: Der britische Stargeiger tritt übernächste Saison sein Amt an. Ein Glücksfall für ein um Profil kämpfendes Kammerorchester: Hope ist nicht einfach einer, der ab und zu vorne auf dem Podium stehen und halbdirigierend Violinkonzerte fiedeln wird, sondern er steht für eine Zukunft der Klassik: Neue Projekte, neue Orte, andere Formen, der Miteinbezug von Sprache – alles Dinge, die Hope längst weltweit ausprobiert hat. Und bestens verkauft.

Hope wird allerdings explizit nicht Chefdirigent des ZKO. Als Music Director wird er andere Dirigenten und dirigierende Solisten einladen. Wer deshalb befürchtet, dass dem ZKO nun der vom ehemaligen, 81-jährigen Chefdirigenten Roger Norrington entwickelte Charakter verloren geht, hat vielleicht nicht unrecht. Aber eben: mit einem fixen Dirigenten ist man auch wieder nur ein kleines Tonhalle-Orchester. Mit Hope wird man ein noch flexibleres, noch moderneres Ensemble. Mit Hope hat man zudem einen Kopf, der international Gold wert ist. Schon in der Saison 2015/2016 wird man die Abo-Konzerte um einen Drittel kürzen (neu 10), und vermehrt im Ausland auftreten.

Fazil Say ist dann Artiste in Residence – und Norrington dirigiert zum Glück weiterhin einige Abende. Die Auslastung ist gestiegen, die Eigenwirtschaftlichkeit ebenso. Auch die CD-Produktion läuft, eben ist eine frische Aufnahme von Haydn-Sinfonien erschienen. Kurz: Es sieht gut aus für das ZKO.

von Christian Berzins

Der Ausstrahlungsaktivist
Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 29.04.2015

Daniel Hope wird «Music Director» des Zürcher Kammerorchesters

Der Geiger Daniel Hope wird Nachfolger von Sir Roger Norrington beim Zürcher Kammerorchester. Hope soll die internationale Ausstrahlung des Orchesters erhöhen – zulasten der Präsenz in der Tonhalle.

Michael Bühler, der Direktor des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO), machte es spannend. Wie in einer Fernsehshow liess er die Saisonpressekonferenz seines Orchesters im Hotel «Eden au Lac» zielgerichtet auf den Höhepunkt zulaufen. Zunächst gab es ein Puzzle-Bild zum Raten, dann öffneten sich die Türen, und zum Einzug des Helden, der punktgenau leibhaftig im Saal erschien, hätte bloss noch eine tönende Untermalung im Stil von «We Are the Champions» gefehlt. Ganz schön viel Pomp für eine Personalie, die einige Zürcher Spatzen schon seit längerem von den Dächern pfiffen: Der Geiger Daniel Hope wird neuer «Music Director» des ZKO.

Hope wird seine neue Funktion, die man früher schlicht «Chefdirigent» oder «Künstlerischer Leiter» genannt hätte und in der offenbar genau diese zwei Aufgaben zusammenfliessen sollen, zur Saison 2016/17 antreten. Er schliesst damit die Lücke, die der Rücktritt von Sir Roger Norrington hinterlässt: Norrington will sein Amt als «Principal Guest Conductor» des ZKO zum Ende der laufenden Saison aus Altersgründen abgeben; er wird dem Orchester aber durch Gastauftritte eng verbunden bleiben. Daniel Hope soll dafür bereits jetzt aktiv in die künstlerischen Planungen einsteigen. In der Interimssaison bis zu seinem offiziellen Antritt wird Konzertmeister Willi Zimmermann verstärkt Leitungsaufgaben im Orchester übernehmen.

Für Daniel Hope schliesst sich, wie er nicht ohne Rührung erzählte, mit seiner Berufung ein Kreis in seinem Künstlerleben. Noch in der Ära des Orchestergründers Edmond de Stoutz habe er mit dem ZKO einige wichtige frühe Konzerterfahrungen sammeln dürfen: «Das erste Mozart-Konzert, den ersten Bach – das vergisst man nie», schwärmte Hope. Für die Zukunft hat er sich vorgenommen, zusammen mit dem Geigenkollegen Zimmermann und den weiteren Stimmführern eine «gemeinsame Vision» für das Orchester zu entwickeln. Wie diese konkret aussehen könnte, verriet Hope noch nicht.

Aus der Personalie Hope und einigen Bemerkungen Bühlers kann man aber erraten, wohin die Reise gehen soll. Man zielt offenkundig auf noch mehr überregionale und internationale Ausstrahlung – Hope, der seine vielfältigen Aktivitäten auf seiner persönlichen Website unter Rubriken wie «The Violinist», «The Broadcaster», «The Musical Activist», «The Producer» und «The Author» auflistet, dürfte nicht zuletzt die mediale Präsenz des Orchesters beträchtlich erhöhen.

Schon in der kommenden Saison 2015/16 will man beim ZKO einige Konsequenzen aus Erfahrungen der vergangenen Spielzeiten ziehen. Während die Besucherzahlen bei den Konzerten in der Tonhalle 2013/14 nur geringfügig auf rund 25 000 gestiegen seien, so Bühler, habe man die Gesamtzahl durch Tourneen und Gastspiele auf über 55 700 Konzertbesucher steigern und somit mehr als verdoppeln können.

Dieser Erfolgskurs soll nun durch eine Ausweitung der Aktivitäten in Stadt und Kanton, aber auch über Zürich hinaus fortgeführt werden. Im Gegenzug wird die Präsenz in der Tonhalle bei den Abo-Konzerten – ein unerwartet drastischer Schritt – um ein Drittel, von 15 auf 10 Veranstaltungen, reduziert. Artist in Residence 2015/16 wird der türkische Pianist und Komponist Fazil Say – auch er ein Garant für viel überregionale Aufmerksamkeit.

von Christian Wildhagen

Daniel Hope wird neuer Leiter des ZKO
Tagesanzeiger, 29.04.2015

Der englische Geiger wird ab der Saison 2016/2017 die musikalische Leitung des Zürcher Kammerorchesters übernehmen.

Nun steht es fest: Daniel Hope wird neuer Musical Director des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO) und beerbt den 81-jährigen Roger Norrington, der in Zukunft aufgrund seines Alters kürzertritt. Musical Director? Die Bezeichnung ist für das ZKO ungewohnt, aber passend. Denn Daniel Hope ist von Haus aus kein Dirigent – er wird das Orchester als leitender Solist führen.

Mit Hope wird aber nicht nur ein bekannter Musiker unter Vertrag genommen, sondern es hält auch eine neue Generation Einzug. Schliesslich ist der Geiger mit 41 Jahren nahezu halb so alt wie Roger Norrington. Was den Charme des Grand Old Man Norrington betrifft, der gerne auch mal während einer Haydn-Sinfonie Faxen gegenüber dem Publikum machte, schliesst Hope nahtlos an dessen Kontaktfreude an. Sein Buch «Wann darf ich klatschen?» nimmt dem Publikum augenzwinkernd die Angst vor den geheimen Regeln eines elitären Betriebs und schlägt damit in dieselbe Kerbe wie das ZKO. Gespräche mit den Publikum nach, Conférencen während des Konzerts und ungewöhnliche Formate wie Konzert-Lesungen machen das Orchester zu einem flexiblen und publikumsnahen Klangkörper. Der Kommunikator Hope wird diesen Weg weiterdenken.

Geiger mit Weltformat
Bis dahin muss sich das Publikum aber noch eine Weile gedulden. Der britische Geiger mit Weltformat wird seinen Posten erst übernächste Saison antreten. Weshalb sich das ZKO unter der Obhut des Konzertmeisters Willi Zimmermann in der Saison 2015/2016 vorwiegend auf Gastdirigenten und leitende Solisten konzentrieren wird. Maurice Steger, Steven Isserlis oder Gidon Kremer kommen nach Zürich, und Roger Norrington bleibt dem ZKO mit zwei Konzerten verbunden. Aus der jüngeren Generation treten Jan Lisiecki, Vilde Frang oder Olga Scheps in den Ring. Und, wenn schon von Jugend die Rede ist: Die überaus erfolgreichen Nuggikonzerte werden weitergeführt. Ebenso die ZKO-Box, die Konzerte im Kunsthaus, selbst einen Artist-in-Residence wird es mit Fazil Say wieder geben.

Auch die Erfolgsbilanz des ZKO kann sich sehen lassen. Die Besucherzahlen haben um 50 Prozent zugenommen, die privaten Mittel konnten gesteigert werden, und die Geschäftsführung erwartet eine «schwarzen Null» – eine solide Basis für Daniel Hope. Dieser schliesst mit dem Zürcher Engagement übrigens einen Kreis. Als zweijähriger Knirps machte er seine ersten musikalischen Erfahrungen mit dem ZKO, weil seine Mutter ihn an mehrere Konzerte mitnahm – seither gilt er quasi als Erfinder der Nuggikonzerte avant la lettre.

Von Tom Hellat

Klavierquartette von Brahms, Schumann und Mahler
Aachener Nachrichten, 24.04.2015

„Klavierquartette von Brahms, Schumann und Mahler“ Deutsche Grammophon/Universal

Unter den zurzeit angesagten Geigern ist Daniel Hope sicher einer der respektabelsten. Vielleicht auch deshalb, weil die Seitensprünge des gebürtigen Südafrikaners vom Podium des mit den großen Orchestern der Welt konzertierenden Solisten von so außerordentlicher Qualität sind. Der 41-Jährige hat Alben mit Sting gemacht, mit Sophie van Otter, mit Max Raabe, spielt Jazz und Filmmusik. Er engagiert sich für Amnesty International, äußert sich politisch, gilt nach seiner Zeit beim Beaux Arts Trio als versierter Kammermusiker. Nun lässt er einen Konzert-Mittschnitt aus New  York mit Klavierquartetten vermarkten. Man darf hin- und hergerissen sein.
Der Kopfsatz aus einem unvollendeten Quartett des 16-jährigen Gustav Mahler zeugt von erstaunlicher Reife eines an Schumann und Brahms geschulten Studenten. Und das Ensemble, zu dem sich die PianistinWu Han, der Bratscher Paul Neubauer und David Finckel am Cello gesellen, harmoniert im selten gehörten Werk bestens. Mahlers romantische Seele blüht. Die CD jedoch legt man für Schumann und Brahms ins Laufwerk. Schumanns E-Dur-Quartett ist einfach wunderbare Musik. Hier schon zeigt sich die Krux eines Ensembles, das von einem Weltklasse-Geiger geführt wird. Wenn der Cellist das gesangliche Thema im Andante cantabile anstimmt, ist man gerührt, wenn es Hope wenige Takte später wiederholt, ist man begeistert. Und verärgert zugleich. Denn man hätte doch gern den Eindruck, dass da ähnlich talentierte Musiker zusammenspielten. Nun ist auch Brahms g-Moll-Quartett dank Hopes wunderbaren Impulsen und seiner großen Erfahrung nichts für die Schublade. Im Gegenteil. Irgendwie quillt große Vitalität aus den Boxen, der im Studio aufgehübschte Live-Mitschnitt versprüht unmittelbaren Charme. Immerhin.

Daniel Hope, aventurier des accords perdus
Le Figaro, 21.02.2015

Féru d’histoire, le violoniste livre “Escape to Paradise”, fascinant retour aux sources du “son hollywoodien”

Le Figaro

In the Shadow of Giants – Daniel Hope explores the Golden Age of Hollywood strings
Strings, 23.01.2015



2014


Escape to Paradise: The Hollywood Album. Music by Rózsa, Korngold, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Eisler, Zeisl, Waxman, Jurmann, Weill, Morricone, Heymann, Williams, Hupfeld & Newman
The Strad, 20.11.2014

An over-abundance of riches in an exploration of the Hollywood sound

Musicians
Daniel Hope (violin) Sting, Max Raabe (vocals), Jacques Ammon (piano), Maria Todtenhaupt (harp), Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra/Alexander Shelley, Deutsche Kammerorchester Quintet Berlin

Composer
Rózsa, Korngold, Waxman, Morricone

The centrepiece of Daniel Hope’s latest album is a commanding performance of the Korngold Concerto that exchanges the swashbuckling, rapier-precision authenticity of Heifetz’s premiere recording for a more heart-on-sleeve, portamento-inflected espressivo that makes it sound more than ever like the concerto Richard Strauss might have composed during his tone-poem heyday. Some may feel that for music already so saturated with bravado machismo and cantabile intensity, less is sometimes more. Yet for a full Technicolor exposé, supported to the hilt by rising conducting star Alexander Shelley, and captured  in gloriously lucid sound, there is no doubting its thrilling impact.

On this kind of form, the dream coupling might have been Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s ‘I profeti’ Concerto (another of Heifetz’s ‘west coast’ specialities), with perhaps the Waxman ‘Carmen’ Fantasy thrown in for good measure, but Hope opts for a selection of filmic miniatures by (mostly) European composers working in Hollywood during the 1930s and 40s. Miklós Rózsa (whose stirring Concerto is another masterwork that might have been included here) is represented by love themes from Ben Hur, El Cid and Spellbound, and there’s the rub: all three are magnificent scores heard in context, but excerpted and placed alongside other miniature sweetmeats – no matter how seductively eloquent the playing – makes this an album best dipped into rather than listened to at a single stretch.
by Julian Haylock

Escape to Paradise
Gramophone, 15.10.2014

Einen Traum erfüllt: Daniel Hope und sein Hollywood-Album
hr2-Kultur, 02.10.2014

Was macht man, wenn die Tage wieder kürzer werden und es draußen ungemütlich wird? “Weg von hier”, mag sich der eine oder andere da denken. Da kommt das neue Album von Daniel Hope gerade richtig: “Escape to Paradise” heißt es, ein Hollywood-Album, für das der Stargeiger Musik aufgenommen hat, die beispielhaft ist für den Sound, der die Bilder aus der Traumfabrik seit Jahrzehnten so eindrucksvoll ergänzt.

 

Erschienen ist die CD bei der Deutschen Grammophon, mit Werken von Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Hanns Eisler und Kurt Weill bis hin zu Filmmusik aus Casablanca, Ben Hur, Schindlers Liste oder American Beauty.

Wer Daniel Hope kennt, der weiß, dass er für fantasievolle, ja fantastische Projekte steht, in die er viel Kreativität und Herzblut steckt. Diesmal hat er Musik von Exil-Komponisten aufgenommen, die in der Traumfabrik von Los Angeles gestrandet waren und dort den “Hollywood-Sound” kreierten – ein Klang mit Geschichte und vor allem aus Geschichten. Einzelschicksale, Träume, in Klänge verpackt, und großes, menschliches Kino.

2 Jahre Recherche

Zwei Jahre hat Daniel Hope für sein Album recherchiert. Er stöberte in den Archiven der Paramount Studios und dabei wurde klar, dass in vielen Kompositionen der Gedanke der Flucht mitspielte, das Zurücklassen alter Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft. Auf seiner CD spannt Daniel Hope einen Bogen von dem jungen Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis hin zu Komponisten, die zwar keine Flüchtlinge mehr waren, deren Musik sich aber auf eigene Weise mit dem Thema Flucht beschäftigt: So ist z.B. John Williams‘ Musik zu Schindlers Liste dabei, oder auch das Love Theme aus Cinema Paradiso von Ennio Morricone.

Hollywood schreibt auch Musikgeschichte

Der Hollywood-Sound vom Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten bis heute – mit “Escape to Paradise” ist es Daniel Hope gelungen, den Fokus auf das zu richten, was sonst eher hinter opulenten Bildern verschwindet: denn die Filmindustrie der Traumfabrik hat auch musikalisch Geschichte geschrieben.

Wie waren die Hörgewohnheiten der Komponisten, die aus Europa nach L.A. kamen? Und welchen Einfluss hatten sie auf die Soundtracks von heute? Überflüssig zu sagen, dass es Daniel Hope bei aller Leidenschaft zu vermeiden weiß, sich der Gefühlsduselei hinzugeben. Mit seinem Album verwandelt er sich in einen Regisseur, der zeigt, dass Hollywood mehr ist als eine wunderschöne Kulisse. Mit seiner wandlungsfähigen Geige führt Hope die unterschiedlichsten Bilder vor Augen. Dazu tragen auch Sting, Max Raabe und all die anderen Musiker bei, die bei “Escape to Paradise” mitgewirkt haben, außerdem reizvolle Arrangements, die manchen bekannten Titel in einem ganz neuen Gewand präsentieren, und ein biegsames Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. Mit diesem Album dürfte sich Daniel Hope einen Traum erfüllt haben – und nicht nur sich!

Von Adelheid Kleine

Das war meine Rettung
Zeit Magazin, 01.10.2014

Als den Eltern auf der Flucht das Geld ausging
Sonntagszeitung, 28.09.2014

von Christian Hubschmid

 «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie»: Daniel Hope, 41
Der blaue Siegelring an seinem rechten kleinen Finger leuchtet wie das Meer. Bald muss Daniel Hope auf die Bühne, doch hat er noch schnell Zeit für ein Interview. «Es entspannt mich», sagt der 41-jährige Geiger. Und bittet in seine Künstlergarderobe in der Alten Oper Frankfurt.

«Das Siegel zeigt das Familienwappen meiner Grossmutter», sagt der Brite Hope in perfektem Deutsch. Die Geschichte seiner Familie ist die Geschichte einer mehrmaligen Flucht. Zwar trat die Familie schon im 19. Jahrhundert vom Judentum zum Christentum über, trotzdem wurde Hopes Grossvater 1934 in seiner Heimatstadt Berlin auf offener Strasse ­zusammengeschlagen. Sofort entschied sich der Grossvater, fortzugehen. Nach Südafrika. Von wo später auch Hopes Vater fliehen musste. Als Apartheid-Gegner in den Siebzigerjahren.

Es ist deshalb kein Zufall, dass Daniel Hope nach dem Interview das Violinkonzert des jüdischen Exilanten Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897–1957) spielen wird. Wobei «spielen» eine Untertreibung ist. Hope lässt das Stück knallen, bringt es zur Explosion wie ein Feuerwerk. Und danach wird man sich fragen: Korngold? Warum kennt man diesen fantastischen Komponisten nicht?

 Musik von Komponisten,  die vor den Nazis flüchteten

«Weil Korngold nach seiner Flucht Filmmusik für Hollywood geschrieben hat», sagt Daniel Hope. Zwei Oscars hat er bekommen, nachdem er in den Dreissigerjahren nach Hollywood emigriert war. Erst nach Hitlers Tod konnte er die Orchestermusik schreiben, die er eigentlich schreiben wollte. So erging es ihm wie vielen Flüchtlingen, deren Musik Daniel Hope auf seiner neuen CD «Escape to Paradise» wiederaufleben lässt.

Es ist Musik von Komponisten, die vor den Nazis in die USA flüchteten. Und es ist «nur» Filmmusik. Doch Daniel Hope macht keinen Unterschied zur zweckfreien Kunst. Die Komponisten hätten ein neues Medium mitgeschaffen, sagt Hope: den Soundtrack zum Tonfilm, den es erst seit wenigen Jahren gab. Die Filmfabrik Hollywood engagierte die europäischen Flüchtlinge mit Handkuss. Wenn sie auch nicht alle glücklich machte. Denn Musik am Fliessband zu schreiben, ist nicht jedermanns Ding. Doch sie komponierten «meisterhaft», schwärmt Hope.

Daniel Hope ist einer der wichtigsten Geiger der Gegenwart. Heute Sonntag wird er in Zürich auf der Bühne stehen, am Eröffnungskonzert des Zürcher Kammerorchesters (ZKO). Hope ist in der Saison 2014/15 Artist-in-Residence dieses renommierten Orchesters. Er sei mit dem ZKO seit seiner frühesten Kindheit verbunden, erzählt er. Jeden Sommer habe er als Kind in Gstaad verbracht, wo das ZKO jeweils am Menuhin Festival auftrat. «Yehudi Menuhin war praktisch ein Mitglied meiner Familie», sagt Hope. Und das kam so.

Daniel Hopes Vater, der Schriftsteller Christopher Hope, wurde vom Apartheid-Regime in Südafrika beschattet, weil er sich gegen die Rassentrennung engagierte. Als auch das Telefon abgehört und er bedroht wurde, floh die Familie Hals über Kopf. Erst nach Frankreich, dann nach London.

Mit 27 jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio

«Hier ging uns das Geld aus», erzählt Daniel Hope lachend. Es war vielleicht sein grosses Glück. Denn nun suchte die Mutter einen Job und wurde Sekretärin des grossen Geigers Menuhin. 26 Jahre lang blieb sie an dessen Seite, die meiste Zeit als seine Managerin. Und Daniel Hope verbrachte seine Sommerferien am Menuhin Festival in Gstaad, dem berühmten Virtuosen lauschend, der oft mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester spielte. Das letzte Konzert, das Menuhin als Geiger gab, erlebte Hope in der Kirche von Saanen mit.

Und er wurde selber Geiger. Einer der besten der Welt. Mit 27 war er jüngstes Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trio. Heute kann er sich aussuchen, mit welchen Orchestern und Dirigenten er auftreten will. Er arbeitet auch mit Popkünstlern wie Sting zusammen und veröffentlicht Bücher, von denen jenes über seine Familiengeschichte, «Familienstücke», ein Bestseller wurde.

Was kein Wunder ist, wenn man diese Geschichte kennt. Denn auch Hopes Urgrossmutter war seinerzeit 1939 aus Berlin nach Südafrika geflohen. Nur der Urgrossvater schaffte es nicht. Er nahm sich in Berlin das Leben. Als deutscher Patriot ertrug er den Gedanken, aus seiner Heimat fliehen zu müssen, nicht.

Daniel Hope steht auf und nimmt seine Geige zur Hand. Er sagt, Musik könne die Welt nicht verändern. «Aber sie ist eine Chance, ein Gespräch anzufangen. Und wir können die Katastrophen dieser Welt nur mit Gesprächen aufhalten.»

Dann geht er auf die Bühne.

Daniel Hope spielt heute mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester Werke von Mozart.  Zürich, Tonhalle, 19 Uhr

Escape to Paradise
BR-Klassik, 22.09.2014

Der Geiger Daniel Hope, geboren 1973 in Südafrika, spricht nicht nur fließend Deutsch. Er ist auch bekannt für seine Vielseitigkeit und seine ausgefallenen Programm, die niemals nur unterhaltsam sein wollen sondern meist eine inhaltliche Botschaft haben.

Schon beim CD-Cover fällt auf: Alles ist hier irgendwie nostalgisch geraten. Und eigentlich müsste der Schriftzug im Hintergrund noch “HollywoodLand” heißen – wie zu jenen Zeiten, von denen diese CD erzählt. Es ist die große Ära der europäischen Emigranten. Die Ära des Holocaust. Und der Focus dieses Filmmusik-Album liegt auf jenen jüdisch-europäischen Exilanten, ohne die es den später so genannten “Hollywood Sound” vermutlich nie gegeben hätte: Miklos Rozsa, Franz Waxman und erst recht Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Schwelgerischer als Heifetz

Korngolds Violinkonzert op.35 ist das ausladendste und sicherlich prominenteste Werk dieser CD; ein Werk, das einerseits eng verknüpft ist mit den Soundtracks großer Errol Flynn-Streifen wie “Another Dawn” oder “Der Prinz und der Bettelknabe”, das andererseits aber längst ins feste Repertoire großer Geiger gehört, seit Jascha Heifetz das Werk auf der Konzertbühne uraufführte. Daniel Hopes Interpretation ist deutlich schwelgerischer als diejenige von Heifetz, und sie ist – wie fast alle Darbietungen dieser CD – durchdrungen von Hopes Sendungsbewusstsein. Ihm geht es um jene Botschaft abseits des glamourösen Hollywood-Emblems und um die Aufdeckung durchaus tragischer Begleitumstände, die zu dieser Musik geführt haben.

Begnadeter Geigeninterpret und verbaler Mittler

Der scheinbar beschwingte Walzer aus “Come back, little Sheba” beispielsweise wurde von dem Mann komponiert, den 1934 die Nazis in Berlin auf offener Straße zusammenschlugen und der dann über Paris in die USA emigrierte: Franz Wachsmann, der sich später “Waxman” nannte. Und wenn an anderer Stelle Max Raabes wohlvertraute Nostalgiestimme erklingt, nämlich in Kurt Weills “Speak Low”, dann erhält auch das plötzlich ein ganz anderes Gewicht – dank der Person Daniel Hopes, der hier wieder einmal in einer Doppelrolle agiert: als begnadeter Geigeninterpret und im Begleitheft als verbaler Mittler.
Ein durchaus nachdenklich stimmendes Hollywood-Album!

Von: Matthias Keller

Der Sound von Hollywood
Crescendo, 22.09.2014

Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album
all-access-lounge.de, 19.09.2014

von: Sebastian Hiedels

Von Korngold über »Cinema Paradiso« bis zu Sting: Auf seinem neuen Album findet Daniel Hope einen verblüffenden Schlüssel zur Filmmusik. Sie ist Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten. Eine Breitbild-Spurensuche in Klängen. Das Album ist seit dem 29. August erhältlich.

Hollywood ist der Ort unserer Träume. Doch wenn Daniel Hope ihn nun mit seiner Geige bereist und erforscht, verändert sich unsere Wahrnehmung. Hope beweist, dass der »Hollywood Sound« ein Klang mit Geschichte und aus Geschichten ist. Die Traumfabrik von Los Angeles war ein Ort, an dem Gestrandete ihre Hoffnungen aus den Koffern kramten und ihre Träume in Klänge verpackten. Großes, menschliches Kino mit fatalen Schicksalsschlägen und amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten.

Auf seinem neuen Album begibt sich der Star-Geiger auf eine sinnlich-historische Spurensuche im Breitbildformat. Und wieder gelingt Hope über die Musik ein faszinierender Blick auf die Geschichte: Nachdem er sich bereits mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches beschäftigt hat und mit den von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern, nimmt er dieses Mal die Spuren jener Musiker auf, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang. Eindrücklich lässt Hope hören, dass der Schmerz der Flucht, das Zurücklassen der alten Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« sind. Mit seiner klugen Auswahl zieht der Geiger einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis zu Filmklassikern wie Schindlers Liste und Cinema Paradiso.

Keimzelle ist für Hope das Violinkonzert von Korngold, das er in der Interpretation vom »König der Geiger«, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat. Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für Anthony Adverse und 1939 für The Adventures of Robin Hood. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Ein kluger Gedanke, der auch musikalisch greifbar wird, denn letztlich ist der Film für Hope nichts anderes als eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit.

Hope horcht dem europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert. Mit von der Partie ist Sting mit »The Secret Marriage«, seiner eigenen Version des Hanns Eisler Liedes »An den kleinen Radioapparat«. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und nun singt er den Song noch einmal gemeinsam mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt auch die Oper Hiob von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Und plötzlich wird ganz selbstverständlich klar, dass die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky seine Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood fand. Hier mussten die Exil-Komponisten allerdings ihr Gedanken-Gepäck aus 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. Flucht bedeutet eben immer auch das Zurücklassen alter Traditionen. Ein Thema, das Daniel Hope persönlich verfolgt: Seine Großeltern sind vor Hitler nach Südafrika geflohen, und seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England.

Mit seinem neuen Album reist Hope bis in die Gegenwart. Neben den Klassikern Ben-Hur und El Cid von Miklós Rózsa hat er sich drei Filme und Komponisten ausgesucht, die ebenfalls das Thema Flucht aufgreifen: John Williams als Korngold-Erbe in Schindlers Liste, Thomas Newmans American Beauty und natürlich Ennio Morricone mit seiner Ode an den Fluchtraum Kino in Cinema Paradiso.

Am Ende dieser CD über den »Hollywood Sound« erklingt ein angedeuteter Nachhall: Hope spielt Herman Hupfelds »As Time Goes By« aus dem Filmklassiker Casablanca – ebenfalls eine große Ode an die existenziellen Momente von Menschen auf der Flucht.

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 09.09.2014

Der Geiger und Forscher Daniel Hope erinnert an jüdische Emigranten, die mit Filmmusik eine neue Existenz aufbauten.

Nach Hollywood, um den Nationalsozialismus zu überleben

Daniel Hope: Darum sind Sting und Max Raabe der Clou an seinem Hollywood Album!
Epoch Times, 06.09.2014

Geiger Daniel Hope ist mit seinem Hollywood-Album erneut ein großer Wurf gelungen.

Am ersten September kam die CD mit dem Titel: „Escape to Paradise“ bei der Deutschen Grammophon heraus. Und die Überschrift verrät es bereits: Den Hörer erwartet hier keinesfalls akustische Zuckerwatte mit Sologeige – es ist eine dramatische Flucht ins Paradies, die hier angetreten wird.

Daniel Hope erforscht mit seinem Album, wie die durch den Holocaust vertriebenen Künstler den Klang von Hollywood kreierten. Wie klassische Komponisten sich in der Filmmusik eine neue Heimat suchen mussten – Und wie trotz all der Schönheit und Süße, die ihre Kompositionen im „Paradies“ der Filmmetropole entfalteten, in ihrer Musik immer noch düstere Schicksale nachklingen, die dem Traum von einer besseren Welt existentielle Tiefe verliehen. Es enstand ein Klang in dem Menschen auf der ganzen Welt ihr eigenes Erleben wiederfanden. Mit „Escape to Paradise“ geht Daniel Hope auf die Suche nach dem Geheimnis dieses betörenden Hollywood-Sounds.

Greatest Hits und Unbekanntes

Daniel Hope macht hier das was er immer macht – und wieder einmal sehr überraschend und überzeugend. Die Musikauswahl enthält sowohl Ohrwürmer, die üblichen Verdächtigen, wie „Schindler´s Liste“, die Liebesthemen aus Ben Hur und El Cid, Ennio Morricones Cinema Paradiso – also das, was der Freizeit-Klassikfan erwartet. Und gleichzeitig führt uns Hope auch an unbekanntere Stücke heran. Das beginnt beim Korngold-Violinkonzert, dass in gewisser Hinsicht der klassische Felsen ist, auf dem die Musik Hollywoods gebaut wurde.

Und es geht weiter mit nostalgischen Perlen, die heutzutage kaum noch jemand kennt, wie zum Beispiel „Tränen in der Geige“ von Walter Jurmann (1903 – 1971) und „Come back, little Sheba“ von Franz Waxman (1906 – 1967).

Unglaublich: Das singen Sting uns Max Raabe!

Typisch Daniel Hope: Er würzt seine Geigen-CD wieder mit hochkarätigen Gästen aus anderen Genres. Böse Zungen könnten jetzt behaupten, dass Max Raabe und Sting hier lediglich als zusätzliche Verkaufsargumente für die Deutsche Grammophon fungieren, aber wer einmal reingehört hat, weiß, die beiden geben dem Album den letzten Schliff und verdichten mit den von ihnen gesungenen Texten den literarischen Subplot – Vertreibung und Vergänglichkeit.

Sting singt auf englisch ein Lied von Hanns Eisler aus „The Secret Marriage“, das melancholischer kaum wirken könnte. Denn es erklingt direkt nach den Haifetz-Arrangement „Sea Murmurs“, jenen sanft glitzernden Wellen, welche die Vertriebenen an die verheißungsvolle Küste der USA gespült haben. Und damit erinnert uns Stings gebrochenes Timbre an die Heimatlosigkeit, welche die Künstler in der neuen Heimat fühlten.

Max Raabes Version von Kurt Weills „Speak Low“ geht dann noch einen Schritt weiter: Das melancholische Lebensgefühl hat sich bereits vollständig in swingende Heiterkeit aufgelöst – scheinbar. Denn um den Abgrund hinter der sonnenbeschienenen Filmkulisse spürbar zu machen, durch die das Lied zu schlendern scheint, braucht es eben einen Max Raabe.

Keine Angst vor großen Gefühlen

Ganz am Ende, nachdem Daniel Hope auch noch einen Ausflug in den „American Beauty“-Soundtrack von Thomas Newman (2000) und die nähere Hollywood-Vergangenheit gemacht hat, schließt er den Kreis wieder in der Vergangenheit mit „Irgendwo auf der Welt gibt’s ein kleines bisschen Glück“ von Werner Richard Heymann. Und mit einem kaum erkennbaren, fragmentarisch-zerbrochenem „As Time goes by“, haucht er seine Hollywood-Träume solistisch aus …

Das alles ist so schonungslos sentimental, dass es ins Auge hätte gehen können. Dank Daniel Hopes musikalischer Leidenschaft, seiner Seelentiefe und dem großen Ernst, mit dem er auch die scheinbar trivialiste Nummer behandelt, trifft es mitten ins Herz.
von Rosemarie Frühauf

 

Daniel Hope: Escape to Paradise – review
Financial Times, 05.09.2014

Pieces played in new arrangements bask luxuriantly romantic world of Korngold, Rosza and their contemporaies

Violinist Daniel Hope shows what happened to the mostly Jewish composers exiled from Nazi Germany when they turned up in the “paradise” of Hollywood.  The result is not an academic exercise – many of the pieces here are played in new arrangements – but an invitation to soak in the luxuriantly romantic world of Korngold, Rozsa and their contemporaries.  Sting makes a guest appearance in a song by Eisler, Max Raabe in one by Weill.  But mostly this is a showcase for Hope’s violin, basking in the saturated emotion of Korngold’s Violin Concerto and soaring through the love themes from films such as Ben-Hur and Hitchcock’s Spellbound.

by Richard Fairman

Es muss ein Thriller sein
Gala, 04.09.2014

Daniel Hope auf der Suche nach dem „Hollywood-Sound“
Kulturradio von RBB, 03.09.2014

Der britische Geigenvirtuose Daniel Hope lädt ein zu einer Reise durch Soundtracks des 20. Jahrhunderts

Daniel Hope ist bekannt für seine Vielseitigkeit – er ist in der Klassik und im Barock ebenso zu Hause wie im Jazz. Seit langem interessiert er sich für europäische Komponisten, die vor oder während des zweiten Weltkriegs nach Hollywood geflüchtet sind und für die Filmstudios komponiert haben. Emigranten wie Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Mario Castel-Nuovo Tedesco , Eric Zeisl oder Miklos Rosza haben mit anderen Kollegen den klassischen “Hollywood-Sound” geprägt. Mit seiner neuen CD “Escape to Paradise” hat Daniel Hope diesen Komponisten ein Denkmal gesetzt.

Kernstück der Platte ist ein Violinkonzert in D-Dur , op. 35, von Erich Wolfgang Korngold in drei Sätzen. Der österreichische Komponist hat es nach seinen Erfolgen in Hollywood komponiert, inspiriert von seinen eigenen Arbeiten für den Film. Daniel Hope spielt das Konzert wohltuend akkurat, sehr eindringlich, technisch perfekt und im wirbelnden Wechsel zwischen schmeichelnd-süß und geradezu vehement fordernd. Dieses Werk zeigt, wie gut Korngold sein Handwerk beherrschte.

 

Das Vermächtnis des Hollywood-Sounds

Daniel Hope schlägt auf “Escape to Paradise” einen Bogen zu Filmen unserer Zeit und hat drei Komponisten ausgewählt, die in der Tradition des “Hollywood-Sounds” stehen: Thomas Newman,  John Williams und Enrico Morricone, die die Soundtracks zu den bekannten Filmen “American Beauty”, “Schindlers Liste” und “Cinema Paradiso” geschrieben haben.  Alle drei Filme beschäftigen sich ebenfalls mit dem Thema Flucht . Daniel Hope gelingt es bei dem Soundtrack zu “American Beauty”, mit seinem sinnlichen Spiel den Schmerz der Einsamkeit, die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Welt und auch die Flucht vor sich selbst, die ja in dem Film zentrales Thema ist, zu vermitteln.

 

Gastsänger Sting und Max Raabe

Gastsänger Sting performt einen eigenen Song “The Secret Marriage”, der auf einer Melodie von Hanns Eisler basiert und Max Raabe singt Kurt Weill zu Hopes Geigentönen  – was das Album umso interessanter macht.

 

Von alten Schätzen zu Neuentdeckungen

Auf “Escape to Paradise” finden sich alte Klassiker wie “As time goes by” arrangiert für Sologeige, und charmante Neuentdeckungen  wie “Sea Murmurs” von Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, arrangiert von Jascha Heifetz.

Mit “Escape to Paradise” kann man schwelgen , nachdenken,  zeitreisen und genießen – ein schöner  Einstieg für Filmfans, die Klassik hören wollen und umgekehrt. Hope versteht es durch sein intensives wendiges Spiel, die Essenz dieser traumumwehten Musik genau einzufangen. Manchen mag es nach zu großen Gefühlen klingen, zu viel Pathos mitschwingen, aber das braucht es mitunter, um die “message” der Filme zu transportieren, sie ohne Bilder sprechen zu lassen. Das gelingt Daniel Hope sehr gut.

Wer keine Angst vor großen Gefühlen hat, wird Gefallen finden an Daniel Hopes Hollywood-Album “Escape to Paradise”.

Anne Spohr, kulturradio

Escape To Paradise: The Hollywood Album
cdstarts.de, 29.08.2014

Ein Ausflug tief in die Seele des Hollywoods der 30er, 40er und 50er Jahre.

Ob Nigel Kennedy oder David Garrett (um nur zwei zu nennen): Von Violinisten geht immer dann eine ganz besondere Faszination für das Pop-Publikum aus, wenn sie in ihrem Fach über den stilistischen Tellerrand hinausschauen und die klassische Musik um Komponenten aus der Unterhaltungsmusik erweitern. Der Südafrikaner Daniel Hope (41) ist ebenfalls einer dieser Star-Geiger, die sich nicht limitieren lassen wollen und zusätzliche Facetten in ihr Spiel einbringen. Mit seinem neuesten Album, das sich dem Sound der Film-Metropole Hollywood widmet, wird das deutlicher denn je.

Grundsätzlich neu ist die Idee zwar nicht, mehr oder weniger bekannte Themen großer Hollywood-Filme auf die ureigene Art eines Musikers neu einzuspielen, aber wenigstens hetzt Daniel Hope nicht durch ein Sammelsurium der üblichen Blockbuster-Melodien, sondern verfolgt ein echtes Konzept, das tief in die Seele des Hollywoods der 30er, 40er und 50er Jahre eintaucht und nur wenige Ausnahmen zulässt, wie die Themen aus „Nuovo Cinema Paradiso“ (1988), „Schindler’s List“ (1993) und „American Beauty“ (1999). Eine ausführliche Erklärung zu den Hintergründen der ausgewählten Stücke findet sich übrigens in dem sehr informativ aufgemachten Booklet des Albums!

So ist „Escape To Paradise: The Hollywood Album“ eine Mischung aus dem Spiel von Daniel Hopes Solo-Violine und den Breitwandklängen klassischer Soundtracks, die bis auf zwei Ausnahmen rein instrumental vorgetragen wird: Die Label-Kollegen Sting in „Love theme“ aus dem Film „El Cid“ und der Deutsche Max Raabe in „Speak low“ steuern die einzigen Gesangsparts zu dem Album bei. Ein bisschen Crossover-Potenzial für eine bessere Vermarktung muss eben sein. Wie gut, wenn man bei einem Sublabel des Universal-Konzerns unter Vertrag steht.

„Escape To Paradise: The Hollywood Album“ ist ein Special-Interest-Werk, das sowohl Klassik-, als auch Soundtrack-Freunde ansprechen soll. Doch am Ende behält die Klassik die Oberhand. Schließlich drückt Daniel Hope den Stücken mit seinem Violinen-Spiel seinen ganz persönlichen Stempel auf. Dieser ist weniger speziell als vermutet, aber immer noch so stark ausgeprägt, dass Freunde von Violinenklängen am ehesten auf ihre Kosten kommen.

Link: http://www.cdstarts.de/musikreview/116304-Daniel-Hope-Escape-To-Paradise-The-Hollywood-Album.html

Daniel Hope “Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album” | ab heute im Handel
entertainment-base.de, 29.08.2014

Von Korngold über »Cinema Paradiso« bis zu Sting: Auf seinem neuen Album (VÖ: 29.08.) findet Daniel Hope einen verblüffenden Schlüssel zur Filmmusik. Sie ist Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten. Eine Breitbild-Spurensuche in Klängen. Hollywood ist der Ort unserer Träume. Doch wenn Daniel Hope ihn nun mit seiner Geige bereist und erforscht, verändert sich unsere Wahrnehmung. Hope beweist, dass der »Hollywood Sound« ein Klang mit Geschichte und aus Geschichten ist. Die Traumfabrik von Los Angeles war ein Ort, an dem Gestrandete ihre Hoffnungen aus den Koffern kramten und ihre Träume in Klänge verpackten. Großes, menschliches Kino mit fatalen Schicksalsschlägen und amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten.

Auf seinem neuen Album begibt sich der Star-Geiger auf eine sinnlich-historische Spurensuche im Breitbildformat. Und wieder gelingt Hope über die Musik ein faszinierender Blick auf die Geschichte: Nachdem er sich bereits mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches beschäftigt hat und mit den von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern, nimmt er dieses Mal die Spuren jener Musiker auf, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang. Eindrücklich lässt Hope hören, dass der Schmerz der Flucht, das Zurücklassen der alten Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« sind. Mit seiner klugen Auswahl zieht der Geiger einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis zu Filmklassikern wie Schindlers Liste und Cinema Paradiso.

Keimzelle ist für Hope das Violinkonzert von Korngold, das er in der Interpretation vom »König der Geiger«, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat. Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für Anthony Adverse und 1939 für The Adventures of Robin Hood. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Ein kluger Gedanke, der auch musikalisch greifbar wird, denn letztlich ist der Film für Hope nichts anderes als eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit.

Hope horcht dem europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert. Mit von der Partie ist Sting mit »The Secret Marriage«, seiner eigenen Version des Hanns Eisler Liedes »An den kleinen Radioapparat«. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und nun singt er den Song noch einmal gemeinsam mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt auch die Oper Hiob von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Und plötzlich wird ganz selbstverständlich klar, dass die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky seine Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood fand. Hier mussten die Exil-Komponisten allerdings ihr Gedanken-Gepäck aus 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. Flucht bedeutet eben immer auch das Zurücklassen alter Traditionen. Ein Thema, das Daniel Hope persönlich verfolgt: Seine Großeltern sind vor Hitler nach Südafrika geflohen, und seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England.

Mit seinem neuen Album reist Hope bis in die Gegenwart. Neben den Klassikern Ben-Hur und El Cid von Miklós Rózsa hat er sich drei Filme und Komponisten ausgesucht, die ebenfalls das Thema Flucht aufgreifen: John Williams als Korngold-Erbe in Schindlers Liste, Thomas Newmans American Beauty und natürlich Ennio Morricone mit seiner Ode an den Fluchtraum Kino in Cinema Paradiso.

Am Ende dieser CD über den »Hollywood Sound« erklingt ein angedeuteter Nachhall: Hope spielt Herman Hupfelds »As Time Goes By« aus dem Filmklassiker Casablanca – ebenfalls eine große Ode an die existenziellen Momente von Menschen auf der Flucht.

Link: http://www.entertainment-base.de/2014/08/29/album-daniel-hope-escape-to-paradise-the-hollywood-album-ab-29-08-im-handel/

DANIEL HOPE – Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album
terrorverlag.com, 29.08.2014

DANIEL HOPE ist ein südafrikanisch-britischer Geiger, der berühmt ist für seine Musikalität und Vielseitigkeit. Auf seinem neuen Album „Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album“ beschäftigt er sich mit Filmmusik aus der Feder europäischer Exil-Komponisten, die den Hollywood-Sound kreierten. Zu hören gibt es beispielsweise Themen aus Filmklassikern wie „Ben Hur“ oder „Schindlers Liste“ – gesanglich unterstützt von STING und MAX RAABE. Außerdem mit von der Partie: das Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra unter der Leitung von Alexander Shelley, der Pianist Jacques Ammon und Maria Todtenhaupt an der Harfe.

Keimzelle war für den 41-jährigen das Violinkonzert von Korngold, der 1934 nach Hollywood emigrierte und zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken erhielt. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Das europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre zeichnet er nach, indem er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert: Mit STINGs eigener Version des Hanns-Eisler-Liedes „An den kleinen Radioapparat“ das hier „The Secret Marriage“ heißt und mit MAX RAABE, der „Speak Low“ von Kurt Weill performt. Die musikalische Reise auf „Escape To Paradise“ reicht vom Jahr 1908 („Prelude And Serenade“ aus „Der Schneemann“ von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis hin zur jüngsten Vergangenheit, die beispielhaft mit dem Titelstück aus „American Beauty“ aus der Feder von Thomas Newman repräsentiert wird. Ein Komponist wie ENNIO MORRICONE darf natürlich ebenfalls nicht fehlen. Hier sei das „Love Theme“ aus „Cinema Paradiso“ genannt.

Großes Kino – sowohl optisch als auch (wie im Falle dieser CD) akustisch. Zweifellos ist diese Klassik-Veröffentlichung nicht unbedingt das, was die Terrorverlag-Leserschaft zwischendurch mal eben in den CD-Player schiebt, aber dem einen oder anderen Cineasten mit gewissen Neigungen zur sogenannten ernsten Musik wird hier bestimmt das Herz aufgehen.

Link: http://www.terrorverlag.com/rezensionen/daniel-hope/escape-paradise-hollywood-album/

Daniel Hope – „Escape To Paradise – The Hollywood Album“
echte-leute.de, 28.08.2014

Von Korngold über »Cinema Paradiso« bis zu Sting: Auf seinem neuen Album (VÖ: 29.08.) findet Daniel Hope einen verblüffenden Schlüssel zur Filmmusik. Sie ist Echo der europäischen Exil-Komponisten. Eine Breitbild-Spurensuche in Klängen.

Hollywood ist der Ort unserer Träume. Doch wenn Daniel Hope ihn nun mit seiner Geige bereist und erforscht, verändert sich unsere Wahrnehmung. Hope beweist, dass der »Hollywood Sound« ein Klang mit Geschichte und aus Geschichten ist. Die Traumfabrik von Los Angeles war ein Ort, an dem Gestrandete ihre Hoffnungen aus den Koffern kramten und ihre Träume in Klänge verpackten. Großes, menschliches Kino mit fatalen Schicksalsschlägen und amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten.

Auf seinem neuen Album begibt sich der Star-Geiger auf eine sinnlich-historische Spurensuche im Breitbildformat. Und wieder gelingt Hope über die Musik ein faszinierender Blick auf die Geschichte: Nachdem er sich bereits mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches beschäftigt hat und mit den von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern, nimmt er dieses Mal die Spuren jener Musiker auf, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang. Eindrücklich lässt Hope hören, dass der Schmerz der Flucht, das Zurücklassen der alten Kulturen und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« sind. Mit seiner klugen Auswahl zieht der Geiger einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold bis zu Filmklassikern wie Schindlers Liste und Cinema Paradiso.

Keimzelle ist für Hope das Violinkonzert von Korngold, das er in der Interpretation vom »König der Geiger«, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat. Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für Anthony Adverse und 1939 für The Adventures of Robin Hood. Sein leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Ein kluger Gedanke, der auch musikalisch greifbar wird, denn letztlich ist der Film für Hope nichts anderes als eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit.

Hope horcht dem europäischen Echo der 1930er-Jahre nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert. Mit von der Partie ist Sting mit »The Secret Marriage«, seiner eigenen Version des Hanns Eisler Liedes »An den kleinen Radioapparat«. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und nun singt er den Song noch einmal gemeinsam mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt auch die Oper Hiob von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Und plötzlich wird ganz selbstverständlich klar, dass die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky seine Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood fand. Hier mussten die Exil-Komponisten allerdings ihr Gedanken-Gepäck aus 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. Flucht bedeutet eben immer auch das Zurücklassen alter Traditionen. Ein Thema, das Daniel Hope persönlich verfolgt: Seine Großeltern sind vor Hitler nach Südafrika geflohen, und seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England.

Mit seinem neuen Album reist Hope bis in die Gegenwart. Neben den Klassikern Ben-Hur und El Cid von Miklós Rózsa hat er sich drei Filme und Komponisten ausgesucht, die ebenfalls das Thema Flucht aufgreifen: John Williams als Korngold-Erbe in Schindlers Liste, Thomas Newmans American Beauty und natürlich Ennio Morricone mit seiner Ode an den Fluchtraum Kino in Cinema Paradiso.

Am Ende dieser CD über den »Hollywood Sound« erklingt ein angedeuteter Nachhall: Hope spielt Herman Hupfelds »As Time Goes By« aus dem Filmklassiker Casablanca – ebenfalls eine große Ode an die existenziellen Momente von Menschen auf der Flucht

Link: http://www.echte-leute.de/daniel-hope-escape-to-paradise-the-hollywood-album/

Jäger des grossen Klanges
Focus (de), 25.08.2014

Focus Artikel: Link

Flucht ins Paradies – Künstlerexil Hollywood
stagecat.de, 25.08.2014

Daniel Hope hat mit der Deutschen Grammophon ein ungewöhnliches Projekt umgesetzt. Der Star-Violinist und Buchautor hat sich auf seinem neuen Album “Escape to Paradise” auf eine musikalische Spurensuche in Hollywood begeben, an seiner Seite Max Raabe und Sting.
In den letzten Jahren hatte sich der Wahl-Wiener mit Komponisten und Musikern beschäftigt, die das Hitler-Regime in Europa nicht überlebten. Auf seinem neuen ‘Hollywood Album’ bringt er nun jene Künstler zu Gehör, denen die Flucht in die USA gelang und die sich in der neuen Welt, der Traumfabrik Hollywoods als Menschen und Künstler neu finden mussten. In ihre Arbeit brachten sie die Erfahrung von Vertreibung und Flucht ein. Daniel Hope spürt in den Werken dieser Hollywood-Künstler dem wahren Sound der Traumfabrik nach, den Geschichten und Erfahrungsräumen unterhalb des inszenierten Bombastes.

Ort der Gestrandeten

Daniel Hopes Familiengeschichte ist mit dem Thema Exil eng verbunden. Seine Großeltern flohen vor dem Hitler-Regime nach Südafrika, seine Eltern vor dem Apartheidsregime nach England. Musik als Medium der Kommunikation ist ein Schlüssel zum künstlerischen Werk Daniel Hopes und dessen gesellschaftlichem Engagement mit der Freya-von-Moltke-Stiftung, Yehudi Menuhins Live-Music-Now-Stiftung oder mit Amnesty International gleichermaßen. Hope sucht in den Tönen die vergessenen Geschichten der Menschen auf und regt zu neuen Perspektiven auf vermeintlich Altbekanntes an.

Die Traumfabrik Hollywoods und ihre legendären Filmmusiken macht Hope hörbar als einen Ort der Hoffnung für gestrandete Künstler, deren vorheriges Leben auf das Volumen eines Koffers geschrumpft war. Dem Fatum eines grausamen Schicksals entkommen arbeiteten diese Künstler, denen nicht viel mehr geblieben war, als ihr Talent, zugleich an den cineastischen Visionen Hollywoods, wie an der eigenen Hoffnung auf Zukunft. Eindrücklich arbeitet Daniel Hope in seiner musikalischen Umsetzung den Schmerz der Flucht, den Verlust der alten Kultur und die Sehnsucht nach einer besseren Zukunft als die Grundlagen des »Hollywood Sound« heraus. Seine Auswahl zieht einen Bogen von Erich Wolfgang Korngold, dem einstigen Wunderkind der österreichischen klassischen Moderne und legendärem Opernkomponisten, bis zu Filmklassikern wie “Schindlers Liste” und “Cinema Paradiso”.

Leitmotiv “Flucht”

Nachdem sich Hope mit den verbotenen Kompositionen des Dritten Reiches und von den Nazis ermordeten Tonsetzern beschäftigt hat, gilt seine Aufmerksamkeit diesmal denen, deren Flucht gelang. “Escape to Paradise” konzentriert sich nicht auf biographische Spuren des Exils, sondern sucht ebenso in der filmmusikalischen Bearbeitung des Themas Flucht nach Zusammenhängen, nach Hollywoods Schicksals-Melodie. In der Auswahl der Werke kam dabei, so Hope, “eine Art Mosaik zusammen”. “Hollywood war geradezu ein Sinnbild für Flucht, auf vielen verschiedenen Ebenen. Man kann das Album auch als eine Suche nach dem wahren ‘Hollywood Sound’ betrachten”.

So kommen neben den Exil-Komponisten der ersten Stunde auch drei lebende Komponisten zu Gehör. John Williams, der die meisten Oscar-Nominierungen erhielt, sieht Hope mit der Filmmusik zu “Schindler’s Liste” in klarer Tradition zu Korngold. Dessen Violinkonzert, das Hope in der Interpretation vom “König der Geiger”, von Jascha Heifetz, der seinerseits nach Hollywood emigriert war, kennengelernt hat, ist die zentrale Interpretationsfolie und Keimzelle des Hollywood-Sound, wie Hope ihn hört.

Korngold emigrierte 1934 nach Hollywood, arbeitete für die Warner Bros.-Studios und erhielt zwei Oscars für seine Filmmusiken, 1937 für “Anthony Adverse” und 1939 für “The Adventures of Robin Hood”. Dessen leidenschaftlich träumerisches Violinkonzert steht für Hope stellvertretend für alle Hoffnungen und Sehnsüchte, die das Kino seit jeher bedient. Letztlich ist der Film für Hope eine opulente Welt der Flucht aus unserer Wirklichkeit, somit auch ein Ort symbolischer Befreiung.

Daneben bringt Hope Thomas Newman, Sohn des legendären Hollywood-Komponisten Alfred Newman, zu Gehör, der in “American Beauty” von “der Flucht von einem Leben in ein anderes erzählt”. Zur Vertiefung der Sound-Geschichte Hollywoods wird Ennio Morricone herangezogen, der in “Cinema Paradiso” die Weltflucht des Jungen Salvatore ins Kino untermalt. So reist Hope mit seinem neuen Album über Klassiker wie “Ben-Hur” und “El Cid” von Miklós Rózsa bis in die Gegenwart und horcht dem fernen Hall des Echos der 1930er-Jahre in Europa nach, wenn er sich den Berliner und Wiener Shows und Revues annähert.

Zwischen Tradition und Neuanfang

Bei seiner musikalischen Spurensuche im Breitbandformat erhält Hope prominente Unterstützung. Sting singt sein eigene Textversion zu Hanns Eislers Lied “An den kleinen Radioapparat”. Der Popstar hatte den Brecht-Text des Liedes schon 1987 umgedichtet und singt “The Secret Marriage” nun mit Hope ein. Außerdem singt Max Raabe »Speak Low« von Kurt Weill.

Hope stellt die Oper “Hiob” von Eric Zeisl nach dem gleichnamigen Roman von Joseph Roth vor, die sich ebenfalls mit der Flucht aus Europa in die USA beschäftigt. Die europäischen Traditionen, denen die Exilanten verbunden waren, werden noch in den Brüchen deutlich. Die Entwicklung der Musik von Wagner und Mahler fand über die Wiener Schule von Schönberg, Korngold und Zemlinsky ihre Fortsetzung in den Filmstudios von Hollywood. Die Exil-Komponisten mussten ihre Prägung in der 12-Ton-Musik gegen die neue US-Mode des Pathos eintauschen und von der Walzerwelt in die Welten von Romanzen und »Wild West« eintauchen. So verschmolz die Musiktradition der alten Welt, die Erfahrung von Flucht und Vertreibung, mit den Melodien der Traumfabrik zu amerikanischen Erfolgsgeschichten, deren innewohnende Brüche und Tragödien Daniel Hope hörbar macht.

Text: Mirco Drewes

Link: http://stagecat.de/klatsch.php?eintrag=25082014194



2013


What’s Still Timeless About ‘Seasons’
The Wall Street Journal, 23.08.2013

By DANIEL HOPE – I first experienced Vivaldi as a toddler at Yehudi Menuhin’s festival in Gstaad, Switzerland, in 1975. One day I heard what I thought was birdsong coming from the stage. It was the opening solo of “La Primavera” from the “Four Seasons.” It had such an electrifying effect that I still call it my “Vivaldi Spring.” How was it possible to conjure up so vivid, so natural a sound, with just a violin?

Opinions of Vivaldi divide between those who adore and those who despise him. Ask the average person if he recognizes a classical melody, however poorly hummed, and he will probably nod enthusiastically at the second theme of “Spring” from the “Four Seasons.” On the other hand, Igor Stravinsky summed up the case for the other side when he quipped, “Vivaldi wrote one concerto, 400 times.”

Yes, Vivaldi was incredibly prolific. Nonetheless, his most famous work remains his “Four Seasons.” To understand this masterpiece, it helps to shed a little light on the rise and fall of one of the greatest violinists of the 18th century. Born in Venice in 1678 into a desperately poor family, Vivaldi chose the priesthood early on—it offered good chances of advancement. But his plans were scuppered when his severe asthma meant that he was unable to conduct long masses and because, gossip has it, he would nip out for a glass of something during the sermon.

What changed his life forever was an unusual job offer. In 1703 a Venetian orphanage, the Ospedale della Pietà, which provided musical training to the illegitimate and abandoned young daughters of wealthy noblemen, asked Vivaldi to direct its orchestra. Vivaldi understood immediately that he had a unique ensemble at his disposal. Many of his greatest works were written for these young ladies to perform. Very soon, all Europe was enthralled.

He remained there for 12 years and, after an itinerant period working in Vicenza and Mantua, returned to Venice in 1723. The 1720s were a difficult time. The bursting of the “South Sea Bubble” triggered a recession that spread across Europe. Vivaldi needed an income. So in 1723 he set about writing a series of works he boldly titled “Il Cimento dell’ Armonia e dell’invenzione” (“The trial of harmony and invention”), Opus 8. It consists of 12 concerti, seven of which—”Spring,” “Summer,” “Autumn” and “Winter” (which make up the “Four Seasons”), “Pleasure,” “The Hunt” and “Storm at Sea”—paint astonishingly vivid, vibrant scenes. In “Storm at Sea,” Vivaldi reached a new level of virtuosity, pushing technical mastery to the limit as the violinist’s fingers leap and shriek across the fingerboard, recalling troubled waters.

In the score, each of the four seasons are prefaced by four sonnets, possibly Vivaldi’s own, that establish each concerto as a musical image of that season. At the top of every movement, Vivaldi gives us a written description of what we are about to hear. These range from “the blazing sun’s relentless heat, men and flocks are sweltering” (“Summer”) to peasant celebrations (“Autumn”) in which “the cup of Bacchus flows freely, and many find their relief in deep slumber.” Images of warmth and wine are wonderfully intertwined. When the faithful hound “barks” in the slow movement of “Spring,” we experience it just as clearly as the patter of raindrops on the roof in the largo of “Winter.” No composer of the time got music to sing, speak and depict quite like this.

Vivaldi’s fame spread. He received commissions from King Louis XV of France and Rome’s Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni. When Prince Johann Ernst returned to his court at Weimar from an Italian tour, he brought with him a selection of Vivaldi’s earlier, 12-concerto “L’Estro Armonico” (“Harmonic Inspiration”) and presented it to the young organist Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach was so taken with the music that he rearranged several of the concertos for different instrumentation. A legend was born. Johann Friedrich Armand von Uffenbach exclaimed: “Vivaldi played a solo accompaniment—splendid—to which he appended a cadenza which really frightened me, for such playing has never been nor can be: he brought his fingers up to only a straw’s distance from the bridge, leaving no room for the bow—and that on all four strings with imitations and incredible speed.”

But Vivaldi’s fame was eventually to become his greatest enemy. People said that “Il Prete rosso” (“the red priest,” due to his flowing red locks) was surely in league with the devil—seducing those poor defenseless orphans, whose corsets he untied with a mere flick of his bow. The pope threatened him with excommunication. Suddenly, he was out of fashion. Once again he was broke. In May 1740, he headed to Vienna, where Emperor Charles VI had once offered him a position. He died there a year later, and was buried in a pauper’s grave.

Centuries passed. Dust gathered on the red priest’s music. A revival of sorts began when scholars in Dresden began to uncover Vivaldi manuscripts in the 1920s. But what really redeemed him was the record industry. Alfredo Campoli released a live recording of the “Four Seasons” in 1939. But, at least indirectly, the greatest revival of the “Seasons” occurred thanks to Hollywood. Louis Kaufman, an American violinist and concertmaster for more than 400 movie soundtracks, including “Gone With the Wind” and “Cleopatra,” recorded the “Four Seasons” for the Concert Hall Society. It won the 1950 Grand Prix du Disque.

Today the “Four Seasons,” with more than 1,000 available recordings, are not just rediscovered—they are being reimagined. Astor Piazzolla, Uri Caine, Philip Glass and others have all created their own versions. In Spring 2012, I received an enigmatic call from the British composer Max Richter, who said he wanted to “recompose” the “Four Seasons” for me. His problem, he explained, was not with the music, but how we have treated it. We are subjected to it in supermarkets, elevators or when a caller puts you on hold. Like many of us, he was deeply fond of the “Seasons” but felt a degree of irritation at the music’s ubiquity. He told me that because Vivaldi’s music is made up of regular patterns, it has affinities with the seriality of contemporary postminimalism, one style in which he composes. Therefore, he said, the moment seemed ideal to reimagine a new way of hearing it.

I had always shied away from recording Vivaldi’s original. There are simply too many other versions already out there. But Mr. Richter’s reworking meant listening again to what is constantly new in a piece we think we are hearing when, really, we just blank it out. The album, “Recomposed By Max Richter: Four Seasons,” was released late last year. With his old warhorse refitted for the 21st century, the inimitable red priest rides again.

article appeared August 23, 2013, on page C13 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal

Wien ist ein Rückzugsort
Wiener Zeitung, 11.04.2013

Stargeiger und Entertainer Daniel Hope ist weltweit unterwegs und in Wien zu Hause

Von Daniel Wagner

Was dem Stargeiger und Wahlwiener Daniel Hope an seinem Wohnsitz gefällt.

Wien. Frühstück im Dritten. Kann eine Stadt inspirieren? Daniel Hope stimmt zu. Hier kann er alles aufsaugen, die Vergangenheit ist so gegenwärtig wie nirgendwo anders. Wobei die Besonderheit für den Stargeiger die Mischung macht. Wien sei eindeutig ein Schmelztiegel, mitten in Europa, die Nähe zum Balkan, die türkische Vergangenheit. Bei allen Unterschieden verwenden dennoch alle irgendwie die gleiche Sprache. “Abgesehen davon bin ich wahrscheinlich der weltgrößte Fan von Jugendstil”, sagt Hope und lacht.

Natürlich kann Wien für einen Musiker das Zentrum der Welt sein. Allein wenn er durch die City geht und Gedenktafeln von Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven bis zurück zu Vivaldi seinen Weg kreuzen, kann er nur staunen.

Journalistische Triebkräfte
Hat Wien für ihn nicht zu musealen Charakter? Der medial erfahrene Publikumsliebling schüttelt den Kopf. Durch das Wissen um die kulturelle Vergangenheit habe gerade hierzulande die Kultur einen besonderen Stellenwert inne. Denn in der gegenwärtigen Krise wird weltweit bekanntlich zuerst an der Kultur gespart. Zwei Ausnahmen fallen nach Hope hier auf: Deutschland und besonders Österreich, wo die Wertschätzung den Kunstschaffenden gegenüber vorbildlich sei.

Apropos Deutschland: Die Fernsehlandschaft der Nachbarn erkor ihn in den letzten Jahren gerne zum moderierenden Musiker. Klassik erklärt aus dem Mund des Praktikers. Wie wurde man auf seine Entertainer-Qualitäten aufmerksam? Dass er journalistische Triebkräfte hat, wurde ihm schon als Herausgeber der Schulzeitung im südafrikanischen Durban bewusst. Dann das eigentliche Geschäft: Yehudi Menuhin förderte ihn während und nach dem Studium am Londoner Royal College of Music. 2002 folgte er dem Ruf des immer umtriebigen Menahem Pressler (unlängst gab der 89-jährige Pianist sein Wiener Solodebüt). Hope wurde der letzte Geiger des legendären Beaux Arts Trios. Woran er bei dem Ensemblegründer denkt? “Wenn Pressler spielt, ist er einfach Musik. Dieses Gefühl kann nur er verbreiten.” Daneben die internationale Solokarriere. Zum Fernsehen kam er aus purem Zufall. Ein Regisseur bei Arte bat ihn während Dreharbeiten, nicht nur zu spielen, sondern auch zu moderieren. Und es hat Spaß gemacht.

Immer wieder Wien. Auch persönliche Gründe zogen ihn hierher, lebt doch die Mutter seit 20 Jahren mit ihrem zweiten Mann, dem Sänger Benno Schollum, in der Stadt. So schließt sich der Kreis zur komplexen Familienhistorie, Hope bezieht sich väterlicherseits auf katholisch-irische Vorfahren, mütterlicherseits führen die Wurzeln ganz deutlich nach Wien. Genauso wie nach Berlin. Die deutsch-jüdische Provenienz wurde der Familie zum Verhängnis. Ribbentrop persönlich enteignete einen Urgroßvater und machte dessen Berliner Villa zur Dechiffrierstation der Nazis. Der andere, seines Zeichens erfolgreicher Journalist, begrüßte den Machtwechsel. Bis er merkte, dass er “Volljude” war und Selbstmord beging. Der Urenkel feiert im heutigen Deutschland große Erfolge. Gibt es Schatten der Vergangenheit? “Ich liebe das Land, arbeite gerne dort, aber Wien gibt mir die nötige Distanz zur Familiengeschichte.”

“Ich habe das Gefühl, dass oft 300 verschiedene Projekte gleichzeitig durch meinen Kopf schwirren. Ich schnappe etwas auf, manches liegt Jahrzehnte, vieles wird verwirklicht.” Beispielsweise sein unlängst veröffentlichten Album “Spheres”: Schon als Kind liebt er sein Teleskop, über Yehudi Menuhin lernte er den US-Astronomen Carl Sagan kennen und erfuhr von Sphärenmusik, neulich hörte er eine Radiosendung darüber, und währenddessen entstand das Konzept für die Aufnahmen. Es ist Musik zum Ausspannen, fernab des tagtäglichen Wahnsinns. “Wo wir doch so klein in der Milchstraße sind, müssen wir uns die begründete Frage stellen, was es noch da draußen gibt.”

Mit Daniel Hope in den Kosmos schweben
Salzburger Nachrichten, 02.03.2013

von Ernst Strobl

Im Fernsehprogramm wird er so angekündigt: „Einer der besten Geiger der Welt ist Daniel Hope. Bereits mit elf Jahren trat der britische Musiker mit Yehudi Menuhin auf, der ihn einmal als seinen musikalischen Enkel bezeichnete. Über 100 Konzerte gibt Daniel Hope jedes Jahr, immer mit dabei ist seine Guarneri-Geige von 1742 . . .“ Okay, er ist Geiger, aber das ist längst nicht al les. Daniel Hope ist wohl so etwas wie ein Tausendsassa. Neben der weltumspannenden Konzerttätigkeit ist er seit zehn Jahren Künstlerischer Leiter des Savannah Musical Festivals in Georgia, sein Amt als Künstlerischer Direktor des Festivals Mecklenburg-Vorpommern legt er heuer nach vielen Jahren nieder.

Und natürlich nimmt Hope CDs auf. Soeben ist eine der faszinierendsten Aufnahmen der jüngeren Zeit erschienen, mit denen Hope die Hörer wahrhaft in höhere Sphären entführt. Ihn an seinem neuen Wohnsitz Wien anzutreffen, ist nicht einfach. Vor ein paar Tagen passte es. Hope kam eben von Konzerten aus den USA zurück, wo er auch den 89-jährigen Pianisten Menahem Pressler besuchte, der ihn vor Jahren zum Beaux Arts Trio geholt hatte. Es folgte ein Abend mit Klaus Maria Brandauer in Zürich, Wien diente zum Umsteigen nach Göteborg, wo er am Donnerstag mit dem Britten-Violinkonzert bejubelt wurde. Heute, Samstag, ist Hope im SWR Fernsehen zu sehen.

„Spheres“ ist der Titel der CD, ist das was für Esoteriker? Ja, das habe er gern, sagt Hope. Es sei eine schöne Vorstellung, dass Planeten bei ihrer „Begegnung“ Sphärenklänge erzeugten. Hörbarer funktioniert das auf der Geige, wo Reibung Töne erzeugt. Und was für welche! Hope achtete auf die Dramaturgie bei der Auswahl der 18 Stücke. Begleitet vom Dirigenten Simon Hal sey, Kammerorchester, Chor oder Klavier zieht er fragile, innige oder glänzende Fäden über fast filmische Musik vom Barock über Phil Glass bis zu Arvo Pärt, Lera Auerbach und Ludovico Einaudi. Eine intensive, geglückte Entdeckungsreise – auch ohne Sternenhimmel zum Rauf- und Runterhören schön.

CD. Daniel Hope, „Spheres“, u. a. mit Jacques Ammon, Klavier, Deutsches Kammerorchester Berlin, Rundfunkchor Berlin. Deutsche Grammophon. TV. Daniel Hope zu Gast bei Frank Elstner. SWR, Samstag, 21.50 Uhr.

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? Daniel Hope verzaubert mit seiner Geige: CD „Spheres“
The Epoch Times, 28.02.2013

“Komponisten und Werke aus verschiedenen Jahrhunderten zusammenbringen, die man normalerweise nicht in derselben Galaxie findet“, so umschrieb Daniel Hope das Konzept seines neuen Albums, das jüngst bei der Deutschen Grammophon erschienen ist. Der verbindende Gedanke hinter der Musik von „Spheres“ sei die Frage: „Ist da draußen irgendetwas?“

Astronomie fasziniert den britischen Geiger Daniel Hope seit Kindheitstagen und Sternenbeobachtung war neben der Musik seine große Leidenschaft. Da konnte es nicht ausbleiben, dass Hope ein „zeitgemäßes Statement“ zur Sphärenmusik abgeben wollte, jenem seit Urzeiten beschriebenen, selbsterzeugten Klang der Planeten.

Dass „Spheres“ als Konzeptalbum kein Marketing-Gag, sondern eine echte Entdeckungsreise ist, merkt der Hörer spätestens am filigranen Tonfall der CD und ihrer eigenwilligen Zusammenstellung. „Spheres“ vereint musikalische Organismen aus vier Jahrhunderten, ohne nach dem „E“ oder „U“ ihrer Herkunft zu fragen. Und „Spheres“ ist eine jener Sammlungen geworden, die man sehr oft hören kann, ohne dass sie ihren Glanz verliert. Das liegt vor allem an der Qualität der Stücke und ihrer Interpretation, fünf davon sind Weltersteinspielungen, andere speziell neu arrangiert. Sogar Filmmusiken wurden ihrem Entstehungskontext entführt und fanden auf dem Planeten „Kammermusik“ ein neues Zuhause; wegen der Hingabe aller Beteiligten ein künstlerisch glaubwürdiges zumal.

Zu Hopes superbem Geigenspiel gesellen sich Jacques Ammon am Klavier, das Deutsche Kammerorchester Berlin unter Simon Halsey mit kongenialen und ebenbürtigen Streichersolisten, sogar Mitglieder des Rundfunkchores Berlin. Das Klangspektrum, das Daniel Hope seiner Guaneri entlockt, ist faszinierend: Er haucht, singt, schwelgt, spricht mit den Anderen oder ist einsamer Sucher, täuscht Sordinoklänge an, um im nächsten Moment zu vollem Sound aufzublühen, ist Seele der Handlung ohne je selbstgefälliger Virtuose zu sein.

Die CD „Spheres“ hat eine intelligente Dramaturgie, die von einer Ausnahme abgesehen, nahtlos fließt. Sie beginnt mit Bach-Vorläufer Johann Paul von Westhoff („Imitazione delle campane“, ca.1690) in geheimnisvollem Arpeggio-Geflüster und schließt im Heute mit dem fragenden Monolog einer Geige vor dunkler Orchester-Wolkenwand (Karsten Gundermanns „Faust – Episode 2 – Nachspiel“). Zwischen die vielen kurzen Stücke fügt sich „Fratres“, ein rund zwölfminütiger und atemberaubender Arvo Pärt. Ludovico Enaudis „I giorni“ und „Passaggio“ entpuppen sich als wahre Perlen. Karl Jenkins „Benedictus“ wird zum rührenden Dialog von Geige und Chor, der in großem Pathos gipfelt, das hier jedoch zarter und zerbrechlicher als im Original erklingt. Das dreieinhalbminütige Herzstück „Spheres“ von Gabriel Prokofiev behandelt als atonalste Komposition das Thema der Planetenbewegung als sich mechanisch verschiebende Stimmen, zwischen denen Harmonie und Dissonanz entsteht.

Alles ist wunderbar stimmig, bis auf ein Kuschelklassik-Ei, das sich Hope laut Booklet mit voller Absicht selbst gelegt hat: Es ist der „Cantique de Jean Racine“ von Gabriel Fauré, den er während seiner Schulzeit öfter gesungen hat und ereilt den Hörer auf Track 4: Nachdem die Gehörgänge gerade mit minimalistischen Achtelbewegungen von Philip Glass massiert wurden und man langsam in die subtile Klangwelt der CD hineingeschwebt ist, wirkt das spätromantische Chorwerk mit seinen Schmelzklängen und weihnachtlichem Charakter süßlich triefend und wie Creme Bruleé auf nüchternen Magen – obwohl es beispielhaft gesungen ist! Zu allem Überfluss schweigt hier die erwartete Solovioline, mit deren ätherischen Flageoletts es danach weitergeht, als wäre nichts gewesen. Der einzige Ausreißer auf der sonst sehr schlüssigen CD „Spheres“.

„Spheres“ dürfte ein Verkaufserfolg werden, weil das Album Heiterkeit ausstrahlt, die sanft vitalisierend wirkt und sich für alle Lebenslagen eignet. Und auch besonders für Menschen, die nachts absichtlich wachbleiben um Sterne zu beobachten oder Musik zu hören.

Rosemarie Frühauf

Heaven and Hell
, 14.02.2013

Toms Schmankerl der Woche

Vom Sphärenklang zum Untergang mit Tom Asam.

 

Der britische Violinist Daniel Hope ist gefeierter Solist und Kammermusiker und darüber hinaus für seine Vielseitigkeit bekannt. Da gibt es schon mal ein Crossover-Projekt mit Sting. Oder wie zuletzt in der Recomposed Serie der Deutschen Grammophon (bei der er seit 2007 exklusiv veröffentlicht) frisches Blut für Vivaldi durch Max Richters gelungene Re-Interpretation der Vier Jahreszeiten. Nun erscheint Spheres, eine musikalische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema Sphärenklänge. Spätestens seit Pythagoras beschäftigen sich Philosophen, Mathematiker und Musiker mit der Vorstellung, dass die Bewegung der Planeten einen Klang erzeugt, dass Musik eine mathematische Grundlage hat, eine Art astronomische Harmonie, die in allem stecke. Hope nimmt sich dieser so romantischen wie faszinierenden Idee an und spannt dabei einen musikalischen Bogen von der Renaissance bis in die Gegenwart, von Westhoff (dessen Einfluss auf Bach er für unterschätzt hält) über Fauré und Glass bis Arvo Pärt, Einaudi und Nyman. Hinzu kommen Ersteinspielungen von Stücken der Komponisten Alex Baranowksi, Gabriel Prokofieff, Alexej Igudesmann und Karsten Gundermann. Eine bezaubernde Idee, die von Hope u.a. mit Jaques Ammon (Piano), dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin und Mitgliedern des Rundfunkorchesters Berlin phantastisch umgesetzt wurde. Ideal, um öfter mal die Bildschirme ausgeschaltet zu lassen und zum Klang dieser Sphärenmusiken in den Nachthimmel zu glotzen. Mein persönlicher Favorit ist Arvo Pärts Fratres – ein Stück, bei dem die Ganzkörper-Gänsehaut in ihrer Heftigkeit im Wettstreit mit den Freudentränen liegt. Galaktisch.

Spheres – Daniel Hope
www.klassikerleben.de, 14.02.2013

Es ist eine Zusammenstellung von Miniaturen, aber auch etwas längeren Sätzen, die an stilistischer Bandbreite kaum zu überbieten ist. In seiner offenen und stets auf Unentdecktes neugierigen Art forscht der Geiger und künstlerische Leiter der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Daniel Hope, mit dem Deutschen Kammerorchester Berlin unter Leitung von Simon Halsey und bei einigen Tracks sogar unterstützt vom Rundfunkchor Berlin in deutschem, italienischem, amerikanischem und russischem Repertoire nach wahren Pretiosen für sein Instrument. Viele Tracks stammen vom italienischen Filmmusikkomponisten Ludovico Einaudi. Dann werden Ausschnitte aus den berühmten, im John-Neumeier-Ballett „Preludes CV“ auch vertanzten 24 Präludien für Violine und Klavier der russisch-amerikanischen Komponistin Lera Auerbach mit Arrangements von barocken Bach-Präludien oder Genrestücken des Amerikaners Karl Jenkins kombiniert. Selbst Minimalistisches von Philipp Glass oder Michael Nyman findet sich in dieser aparten Sammlung von Violinwerken. Nicht vom großen Sergej, sondern vom jungen Gabriel Prokofjew stammt der Titel „Spheres“. Überhaupt stellen viele Werke ganz junger Komponisten auf Hopes jüngstem Album echte Überraschungen dar, so etwa das Stück „Biafra“ vom 1983 geborenen Alex Baranowski oder das Lento des 1973 geborenen Aleksey Igudesman. Eine Entdeckung ist auch der von John Rutter arrangierte „Cantique de Jean Racine“ op. 11 von Gabriel Fauré.
(Deutsche Grammophon/Universal Music)

(Helmut Peters)

 

Spheres
Bayern Klassik, www.br.de, 13.02.2013

Eine Auswahl sinneserweiternder, meditativer, melodiöser Musik wird auf der CD-Rückseite angekündigt. Eine Zeitreise vom Barock bis in die Gegenwart. Und eine Sternenreise: Die Musikzusammenstellung erklärt Daniel Hope mit seiner Faszination für den Nachthimmel, für die Weite des Universums.
Autor: Ben Alber Stand: 13.02.2013

 

Ist da draußen irgendetwas? – diese Frage verbinde die Musik auf seiner CD, so Hope im Booklet. Mit einer atmosphärisch dichten Bearbeitung einer Solo-Sonate des Barockkomponisten Johann Paul von Westhoff beginnt meine Sternenreise an der Seite von Daniel Hope. Ein erster Blick in den Nachthimmel, es glitzert silbrig, ich hebe langsam ab und freue mich auf den Flug. Dann “I giorni” von Ludovico Einaudi, ein Stück, das es vor nicht langer Zeit in die britischen Single-Charts brachte und in einige Werbespots – zum Beispiel in den eines indischen Telekommunikations-Anbieters.Und da passt es sicher auch gut. Die Botschaft auf “Spheres” vielleicht: “Ja, da draußen ist irgendetwas, ein ganzer Haufen Telekommunikationssatelliten!”

Konzeptalbum mit rotem Faden

Ich vertraue meinem Reiseleiter und bleibe an seiner Seite. Ich gebe zu, die Versuchung war groß, zur Erde zurückzukehren. Aber ich werde für meine Toleranz belohnt: Je länger die Reise dauert, desto mehr erschließt sich Hopes Idee, dem die Reihenfolge der Stücke auf der CD sehr wichtig ist. Nämlich die Idee eines geschlossenen Konzeptalbums, das inhaltlich und klanglich ein roter Faden durchzieht, und das doch auch immer wieder überrascht. Gerade mit zahlreichen Miniaturen jüngerer Komponisten: Max Richter, Alex Baranowski, und Gabriel Prokofiev, der Enkel von Sergeij Prokofiev, haben unter anderem Stücke geliefert, die überzeugen. Prokofiev ist es, der mit seinem “Spheres” am deutlichsten eine Projektionsfläche bietet für die Ängste, die auch Platz haben bei einer (Gedanken-)Reise ins Universum: Wenn da draußen etwas ist – ist es uns auch wohlgesonnen?

 

Ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel

Neben einem ganzen Reigen eingängiger Geigen-Melodien – mal im zarten Duo mit Klavier, mal in weichen Streicherklang gebettet, mal pompös orchestral und vokal aufgeladen – hat auch das unheimliche schwarze Nichts zwischen den glitzernden Sternen immer mal seinen Platz auf dieser CD. Und das ist gut so. Trotz Mars-Mobil und Raumstation bleibt das Universum doch ein großes, unheimliches Rätsel. Schade, wenn das in der Musik anders wäre.



2012


Album: Max Richter, Vivaldi: The Four Seasons, Recomposed By Max Richter (Deutsche Grammophon)
The Independent, 27.10.2012

For this latest entry in Deutsche Grammophon’s Recomposed series, Max Richter reworked the most-heard classical piece by discarding about 75% of the original source material, to leave a leaner, more modern work that’s like a neo-minimalist meditation on fragments of Vivaldi’s melodies. It’s a beautiful recomposition, with undulating string beds carrying Daniel Hope’s lyrical lone violin lines. The “Spring” sections are joyously simple and engaging, with subsequent sections adding depth through high-string harmonies, methodical harpsichord and pulsing string ostinatos that reflect the original Vivaldian style. The result is a creditable palimpsest of the original work informed by modern pop and dance techniques.

Max Richter spring-cleans Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons
The Guardian, 21.10.2012

Musician Max Richter has given The Four Seasons an avant-garde update. Then he had to find an orchestra who could play it. It starts with a shimmer of something strange and soft, an ambient mist of strings that’s both electronic and acoustic. Then something weird happens. Out of these shifting sonic tides comes an ensemble of violins – playing fragments of the world’s most overfamiliar concerto, the soundtrack to 1,000 adverts, an on-hold phone favourite that features on every classical compilation ever. Yes, it’s Vivaldi’s Four Seasons – but not as we know it.

This is Vivaldi Recomposed, by genre-hopping, new-music maestro Max Richter. So the big, clanging question is: why? Why retouch, rework, and reimagine Vivaldi’s evergreen pictorial masterpiece? “The Four Seasons is something we all carry around with us,” says Richter, a German-born British composer. “It’s just everywhere. In a way, we stop being able to hear it. So this project is about reclaiming this music for me personally, by getting inside it and rediscovering it for myself – and taking a new path through a well-known landscape.”

This involved “throwing molecules of the original Vivaldi into a test tube with a bunch of other things, and waiting for an explosion”. You can hear this chemical reaction particularly well at the opening of Richter’s reworked Summer concerto, which has become a weird collision of Arvo Pärt-likemelancholy in the solo violin and a minimalist workout for the rest of the strings. “There are times I depart completely from the original, yes, but there are moments when it pokes through. I was pleased to discover that Vivaldi’s music is very modular. It’s pattern music, in a way, so there’s a connection with the whole post-minimalist aesthetic I’m part of.”

Part of the fun of the album is that your ears play tricks with your memory of the original: these familiar melodies do unexpected things, resulting in an experience that’s both disturbing yet full of strange delights. And imagine how it felt for Recomposed’s solo violinist Daniel Hope: having played the original for decades, he – and more importantly his fingers – faced a surreal task when he first picked his way through Richter’s score.

“It was incredibly thought-provoking,” he says. “I had to deal with all the curveballs Max throws at you, the way he does things you don’t expect.” The experience clearly messed with Hope’s mind. “What really threw me was the first movement of Autumn. He pulls the rhythm around, starts dropping quavers here and there. You end up with a rickety and slightly one-legged Vivaldi. It’s incredibly funny. But even in poking fun at the original, there’s always enormous respect.”

The slow movement of Winter is another standout moment for Hope. “It’s really out of this world,” he says. “It’s as if an alien has picked it up and pulled it through a time warp. It’s really eerie: Max has kept Vivaldi’s melody, but it’s pulled apart by the ethereal harmonics underneath it.”

Can it all work beyond the recording studio? Audiences at the Barbican in London will find out later this month, when Vivaldi Recomposed is given its debut performance, with Hope backed by the Britten Sinfonia under the baton of André de Ridder. If the work sends listeners back to the original with new ears, that’s all part of the point, says Richter. “The original Four Seasons is a phenomenally innovative and creative piece of work. It’s so dynamic, so full of amazing images. And it feels very contemporary. It’s almost a kind of jump-cut aesthetic – all those extreme leaps between different kinds of material. Hats off to him. That’s what I’m really pleased with: my aim was to fall in love with the original again – and I have.”

Max Richter ‘recomposes’ Vivaldi’s Seasons – hear an excerpt!
Gramophone, 12.09.2012

British composer Max Richter is the latest artist to join Deutsche Grammophon’s ‘Recomposed’ series, which invites contemporary artists to re-work an original piece of music, making it accessible to a wider audience. Rather than re-working a recording from the DG catalogue as has been the tactic of previous participants, Richter has chosen to ‘recompose’ Vivaldi’s original score for The Four Seasons. The end result is an amalgamation of Richter’s new composition and Vivaldi’s familiar work in a fresh piece of music.

‘The Four Seasons is an omnipresent piece of music and like no other part of our musical landscape. I hear it in the supermarket regularly, am confronted with it in adverts or hear it as muzak when on hold,’ said Richter. The challenge was to ‘create a new score, an experimental hybrid, that constantly references “Vivaldi” but also “Richter” and that is current but simultaneously preserves the original spirit of this great work. In my notes you will find parts that consist of 90 per cent of my own material; but on the other hand you will find moments where I have only altered a couple of notes in Vivaldi’s original score and shortened, prolonged or shifted some of the beats. I literally wrote myself into Vivaldi’s score.’

Richter is becoming increasingly well known as a composer for cinema – he scored the acclaimed documentary Waltz with Bashir and his music was featured in Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island and Ridley Scott’s Prometheus. He also collaborates with orchestras and ensembles, and creates music for dance theatre and installations.

Featured on the Vivaldi album are British violinist Daniel Hope, German conductor André de Ridder and Berlin’s Konzerthaus Chamber Orchestra. Recomposed is released in the UK on October 29, 2012 – click here for details. The UK premiere takes place at the Barbican on October 31.

A violinist sets out to cleanse Berlin of its past
www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc, 15.08.2012

Daniel Hope, the international soloist, has issues with the city of Berlin. It kicked out his family in the 1930s and expropriated their villa for the use of the war criminals Albert Speer and Joachim von Ribbentrop. Daniel performs often in Berlin. In a piece written exclusively for Slipped Disc, he explains how he is trying to come to terms with the city and its past.

My family’s villa

by Daniel Hope

In June 2012 I performed the “War Concerto” at the Konzerthaus in Berlin, a work I commissioned from Bechara El-Khoury. This piece, composed on a grand scale for violin and large orchestra, is the Lebanese composer’s statement against the destruction and futility of war. El-Khoury has translated his own recollections of the bloody civil conflict which desolated Lebanon in the seventies, into a kind of lament. He dedicated the Concerto to me and, to my surprise, decided to add his musical take on the feeling of being uprooted, as experienced by the Berlin-branch of my own family.

 

(The Valentin family, 1925. Daniel’s grandmother is 3rd from left)

Berlin and me – a story filled with ghosts and fascination. It all started in London, when, as a young boy, our German grandmother would recount stories of “her” Berlin, the Berlin of the Weimar Republic. Of her villa in Berlin-Dahlem, cycling tours around the Wannsee, picnics with the Kaiser’s family or her brother’s confirmation party. This was one of her favourite stories: how the plump Maybachs rolled slowly up the gravel driveway, passing the Spanish fountain. How the guests alighted, chatting happily as they made their way ceremoniously along the terrace and into the house, via the French doors. Then the final directives to the staff, all so celebratory. Speeches to begin, not too punctilious, but nonetheless, imperative. And only then was the banquet to be served: Terrine of Trout, Fillet of Veal and, for dessert,  Chocolate Praline cake. Served with a chilled Zeltinger Schlossberg, 1917 vintage.

One day, long after she had passed away, I found myself standing in front of her villa in Dahlem. The terrace was still there, as was the neatly kept lawn, just as she had once described it to me. I could envisage my great grandfather, Wilhelm Valentin, sitting in his favourite deckchair, puffing on a cigar and relishing the view into his rose-garden. I decided to take a snapshot of the house, to capture the moment. Suddenly, one of the windows opened. An elderly lady appeared. Before I could even flash her a friendly smile, she starting shouting in strident Berlin tones : “What are you doing here? This is private property. Get lost!”

I tried to reassure her that I was only taking a photo of my great-grandmother’s house.

 

“Great-grandmother?”, the old woman barked. “You mean the Valentin family?”, she continued, her tone still hostile.

“Yes”, I replied, more than a little surprised. “This house belonged to my family”. My unconscious emphasis on the word “belonged” dispelled any hope that she might become a little friendlier. At least, I thought,  she might be able to answer some of the many questions that were racing through my head. I was stunned that she even knew the family name, after all, it had been seventy years.

“Did you know my family?” I dared to ask.

There was a moment of silence, which didn’t seem all that reassuring.

“No,” she spat back at me, now almost screaming. “But I know the history of this house!”

With that she slammed the window shut and disappeared.

 

The “history”, as the angry woman in the window put it, was the part that our grandma left out of our bedtime stories: The confiscation of the villa, personally appropriated by both Albert Speer and Joachim von Ribbentrop, who were initially interested in ‘acquiring’ it for their own use. After my family fled Germany in 1936, the house became a temporary refuge for the Jüdische Waldschule (Jewish Forest School) under Lotte Kaliski. Up to 320 children studied there until its closure in 1939.

One of the pupils was film director Mike Nichols, another Michael Blumenthal, who survived the holocaust and later served as Secretary of the US Treasury under Jimmy Carter; he is currently the director of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. It seems hard to comprehend how these things could have happened as they did, but after the Jewish school was closed down, von Ribbentrop, the Foreign Minister of the “Third Reich”, installed the Nazi’s main decoding station in the villa, which became a sort of German Bletchley Park, building antennas and constructing new bomb-proof buildings on the estate  for “Sonderaufgaben” (special tasks).

According to Nazi reports, telegrams from foreign embassies were intercepted, deciphered and delivered promptly to the Führer. This new department, which employed 300 workers in my great grandparent’s former house, was named “Pers Z”. At its peak, it solved the codes of 34 nations, including personal messages between Stalin and Roosevelt, but also some 15,000 French cryptograms up to the defeat of France in 1940. Hitler once visited the house and later planned to  hide in a bunker there. There is a series of secret tunnels constructed under the building as both supply and escape routes. The house is today still owned by the German Foreign Ministry.

Since I uncovered this extraordinary story by a chance and a rather unpleasant encounter, I have started to unearth further family connections on almost every visit to Berlin. Such as the family vault at the Luisen-cemetery in Grünewald, the remnants of  the  yard of my great grandfather’s factory at Großbeerenstrasse 71 in Kreuzberg, or the St. Annen church in Dahlem, where my great aunt conspired with Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Martin Niemöller against government-sponsored efforts to nazify the German Protestant church.

(Daniel’s grandmother)

But what fascinates me most about Berlin, is its perpetual history still hidden deep inside so many of its buildings. And so I decided some years ago to fill these places with music, one after the other, by performing at the Reichstag, the Ministry of Finance (formerly Göring’s Ministry of Aviation), the Felix Mendelssohn-Remise, (the former carriage house of the old Berlin headquarters of the Mendelssohn Bank) and Tempelhof Airport. Making music in these buildings, surrounded by the ghosts of times gone by, let me into a past which I did not experience, but can still sense.  I was lucky enough, in an appearance before the German parliament at the Reichstag, to dedicate my performance of Ravel’s “Kaddish” to both of my Berlin great-grandfathers, and felt more than ever that, in Berlin, music and history go together hand in hand. Just as they do in the “War Concerto”, a piece which has now become even more personal.

Verfemte Musik mit Daniel Hope
OZ, 09.06.2012

Der Stargeiger spricht mit Schülern der Montessorischule über seine Kompositionen. Die Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern bieten hochkarätige Konzerte.

Artikel lesen…

Greifswald – Intendant Matthias von Hülsen (69) kann es kaum erwarten: Das erste Greifswald-Konzert der Festspiele Mecklenburg- Vorpommernbestreitet in dieser Saison Daniel Hope (37). Der Stargeiger und zugleich Künstlerische Leiter der Festspiele bringt beim „Carnegie-Hall-Projekt“ mit Musikern der New Yorker Academy sowie dem Concertino EnsembleRostock imDomSt. Nikolai verfemteMusikzu Gehör. Kompositionen, die von den Nationalsozialisten im Dritten Reich verboten wurden.

„DasKonzert findet unter der Leitung von Jeffrey Kahane statt. Einer der bedeutendsten amerikanischen Musikerpersönlichkeiten, der auch als Solist zu hören sein wird“, frohlockt Matthias von Hülsen. Passionierten Festspielbesuchern sind derlei Verbindungen nicht fremd: Bereits zum dritten Mal lockt das Festival den Nachwuchs des Carnegie- Hall’s Ensembles an die Ostsee.

Gänzlich neu hingegen ist ihr programmatischer Ansatz. Denn bei den Werken von Pavel Haas,Gideon KleinundErwin Schulhoff „handelte es sichumunglaublich begabte, fantastische Komponisten, die deportiert und ermordet wurden“, erklärt Volker Ahmels (50) vom Zentrum für Verfemte Musik an der Hochschule für Musik Rostock. Er muss es wissen. Seit 15 Jahren beschäftigt sich der Pianist sowie Hochschullehrer mit diesem Thema und fand in Daniel Hope einen Partner,dener für die verfemteMusik nicht erst begeistern musste. Dem Briten ist sie nicht zuletzt aufgrund der eigenen Familiengeschichte eine Herzenssache.

Auch deshalb nimmt er sich die Zeit, mit Greifswalder Kindern über diese Komponisten und ihre Zeit ins Gespräch zu kommen. Unmittelbar vor dem Konzert am 15. Juni besucht Daniel Hope mit Volker Ahmels die Montessorischule. Besser noch: „Innerhalb des Projekts ,Rhapsody in School’ wird auch die ZeitzeuginundMusikwissenschaftlerin Eva Herrmannová mitden Kindern ins Gesprächkommen“, sagt Ahmels und fügt hinzu: „Sie ist eine ganz außergewöhnliche Persönlichkeit und wird als Überlebende von Theresienstadt über den Holocaust berichten.“

Die Klasse 6 der Montessorischule hat sich gerade intensiv mit dem Buch „Damalswares Friedrich“ beschäftigt. Ein Jugendbuch, das den Nationalsozialismus thematisiert. „Der Besuch des Jüdischen Museums in Berlin war Teil der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Schicksal derHauptfigur“, berichtet Schulleiter Nils Kleemann. Und auch Musik ist den Schülern nicht fremd. „Durch die Montessori- Musikschule habenviele einen intensiven Zugang zum Musizieren und Singen“, so Kleemann. Der Besuch von Daniel Hope , Eva Herrmannová und Volker Ahmels sei deshalb sehr willkommen.

Matthias von Hülsen hört das gern. Ihmist es enorm wichtig, dass Kindern die Geschichte und speziell dieses Thema nahegebracht wird. „Deshalb laden wir auch insbesondere neben den Erwachsenen alle Greifswalder Schüler ganz herzlich dazu ein, das Konzert im Domzu einemSonderpreis zu besuchen“, betont der Intendant. Möglich wurde es übrigens nur durch die finanzielle Unterstützung der Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Stiftung.

Doch die drei Monate andauernden Festspiele in MV haben für Greifswald durchaus noch mehr zu bieten. Jan Vogler, einer der wichtigsten deutschen Cellisten, interpretiert Ende Juli an zwei Abenden in der Aula der Universität die Bach-Suiten für Violoncello. Sie gelten für Musiker als der heilige Gral: Sowohl harmonisch als auch technisch bringen sie Cellisten an ihre Grenzen, weshalb ihnen nur die ganz Großen ihres Fachs gewachsen seien.

Das letzte Greifswalder Festspielkonzert der Saison ist für die Stadthalle geplant. Ende August werden hier unter Leitung des Polen Wojciech Rajski internationale Meisterkurs-Studenten auftreten.

Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern: Daniel Hope über seine Amerika-Projekte
Ausschnitt aus Zeitungsbeilage, die in einer Auflage von ca. 1 Mio in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Hamburg, Berlin, Niedersachsen und Schleswig-Holstein erschienen ist, 20.05.2012

Daniel Hope über seine Amerika-Projekte

PDF Dokument

Als Musiker bin ich in der ganzen Welt unterwegs. Doch als Künstlerischer Direktor der Festspiele MV freue ich mich über jeden Tag, den ich im Sommer in diesem wunderschönen Land verbringen darf. Und das geht inzwischen auch vielen Musikern aus New York so:
Zum dritten Mal kommt mit dem „Carnegie-Hall-Projekt“ der Spitzennachwuchs von New Yorks führenden Musikeinrichtungen nach Heiligendamm
(13.06.) und Schwerin (14.06.). Besonders am Herzen liegt mir das Konzert im Greifswalder Dom (15.06.), wo ich mit dem Concertino Ensemble Rostock und dem wunderbaren Dirigenten Jeffrey Kahane von den Nationalsozialisten „Verfemte Musik“ von Schulhoff, Haas und Klein spielen werde. Dieses Thema ist historisch wie musikalisch von großer Bedeutung, die diese Werke hör- und spürbar machen.
Für das „Carnegie-Hall-Projekt“ und auch das „Lincoln- Center-Projekt“ proben und wohnen die Musiker dank der Unterstützung des Grand Hotel Heiligendamm in dem malerischen Ostseebad. Für Wu Han und David Finckel, die Direktoren der Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, ist es ebenfalls das dritte Jahr in MV. 2011 hatte ihnen unser damaliger Preisträger in Residence, der Cellist Li-Wei Qin, so gut gefallen, dass sie ihn neben anderen Spitzenmusikern für die Konzerte in Heiligendamm, Bützow, Schönberg und Samow (29.08.–02.09.) gleich wieder eingeladen haben.
Beim Savannah Music Festival in Georgia, wo ich ebenfalls Künstlerischer Direktor bin, sind bereits viele Festspielpreisträger aufgetreten. Daher bringe ich diesen Sommer zum „Savannah-Projekt“ nun erstmalig Musiker des Festivals mit: Mit Philip Dukes, Josephine Knight, Sebastian Knauer u. a. proben wir im Jagdschloss Kotelow in Vorpommern. Konzerte spielen wir in Rühn (08.08), Bad Doberan (09.08.) und Kotelow (10.08.), wo auch ein Werk der Mecklenburgischen Komponistin Emilie Mayer zu hören sein wird, deren 200. Geburtstag wir bei den Festspielen MV feiern. So verbindet sich einmal mehr, was unserer Meinung nach musikalisch zusammengehört: Amerika und Mecklenburg-Vorpommern!

Daniel Hope

PDF Dokument

 



2011


Der reisende Direktor
Stuttgarter Zeitung, 19.11.2011

Er ist ein Tausendsassa: Daniel Hope ist Geiger, Buchautor und verantwortet zudem den künstlerischen Bereich bei den Festspielen Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

PDF – Dokument

Violinist Daniel Hope makes Aspen Music Fest debut
The Aspen Times, CO Colorado, 15.07.2011

Musical tradition comes naturally for Hope

Daniel Hope did not come from a musical family. In fact, when the celebrated violinist and conductor Yehudi Menuhin asked Hope’s mother if she could tell the difference between Bach and Beethoven, her response was, “Yeah, I think so.”

Menuhin wasn’t idly quizzing the woman on her knowledge of classical music; this was a job interview. She gave the answer with enough confidence that she got the job, as Menuhin’s secretary. “And before we could blink, we were thrust into the world of music,” Daniel Hope said.

Out of that world of music, Hope has created another world of music, a mini-empire that spans continents and books, festivals and collaborations. Hope makes his debut at the Aspen Music Festival Friday, in a concert with the Aspen Chamber Symphony and conductor Robert Spano, the festival’s music director-designate. Hope, a 37-year-old violinist, will be featured in two pieces: Ravel’s “Tzigane,” and the American premiere of “Unfinished Journey,” a 2009 piece for violin and strings that Hope commissioned from Lebanese composer Bechara El Khoury, to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Menuhin’s death.

Hope moves over to the Harris Hall on Tuesday, July 19, for “A Baroque Evening with Daniel Hope,” a concert featuring works by the best-known figures of the Baroque period — Bach, Vivaldi, Telemann — and also spotlights the work of Westhoff, a largely forgotten composer who, according to Hope, was considered superior to his colleague Bach early in their careers. “He was one of the great violinists of his day. And a great discovery for me,” said Hope, who featured Westhoff on his 2009 album “Air: A Baroque Journey.”

It is a bit of a wonder that Hope is in Aspen at all. While he is in Colorado, the Mecklenburg Festival, which Hope serves as music director, carries on without him. Hope, however, already did his bit in Mecklenburg this summer, premiering El Khoury’s War Concerto last month. And there will be time for Hope to return to his festival this summer; Mecklenburg, the third largest festival in Germany, spans three months, 80 venues and 125 performances. Under Hope, who took over in Mecklenburg last year, the festival began a young musicians exchange program with Carnegie Hall and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center.

Hope is also the associate artistic director of the Savannah Music Festival, in Georgia, an early-spring gathering that covers jazz, country, bluegrass, gospel, Portuguese fado, and Indian styles, as well as classical.

And there are the projects. Over the last 15 years, Hope has been researching composers murdered by the Nazis; the interest has been manifested in a 2008 concert at the Berlin airport to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht, and a series of events with mezzo soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, including a concert tour and the 2007 recording, “Terezin.” Hope’s latest recording, “The Romantic Violinist,” is designed to cast a light on Joseph Joachim, a 19th century musician whom Hope says was instrumental in the creation of violin concerto repertoire.

Hope is also an author, with three books to his credit. The first was a family history, tracing how the Nazis took over his ancestral villa, in Berlin, and made it into a center for Nazi cryptology. The second, “When Do I Applaud?” is a guide to concertgoing etiquette and customs. “Toi Toi Toi,” which translates as “good luck,” catalogues classical music catastrophes, from onstage deaths to the story that Sting, a friend of Hope’s, told him, about a vocalist who collapsed on the Royal Albert Hall stage during the Proms concerts, and was promptly replaced by a member of the audience.

Hope has his own music tragedy to tell. As a 7-year-old in his first performance, at London’s South Bank Center, with his teacher and several other young players, Hope leaned back against a swinging door and disappeared, to the laughter of the audience.

“I came back in, more laughter. I was incredibly embarrassed — and hadn’t even played a note yet. My career was over before it began,” he recalled. Hope adds that the experience has had a happy ending: “I realized, it’s not about the mishap, but about how you recover, how you make it not a disaster. Whenever I get nervous, I think about that moment and it relaxes me.”

Hope’s entry into the music realm was less of a mixed experience. After Menuhin hired his mother, Hope practically became a fixture at the Menuhin house.

“I was soaking up the music — not only Menuhin, but Stéphane Grappelli, Ravi Shankar, people who came on a daily basis. I remember pulling the spike out from Rostropovich’s cello,” he said. “It wasn’t even a question of wanting to become a musician; music was implanted in my brain.”

One issue loomed over his career — a potential conflict of interest with his mother’s employer. Menuhin intentionally kept his distance from the young Hope, until, when Hope was 16, he heard Hope play — and immediately brought him on a concert tour, with Menuhin conducting and Hope as soloist.

“It was the best possible way of learning those pieces,” Hope, who toured with Menuhin for 10 years and performed at the conductor’s final concert, said. “It’s one thing learning them with your teacher; it’s another to play them in concert for an audience with someone who knows those pieces better than anyone in the world.
stewart@aspentimes.com

The Romantic Violinist – A Celebration of Joseph Joachim
International Record Review, 20.05.2011

Brahms Hungarian Dances, WoO” – No.1 in G minor; No.5 in G minor (both arr. Marc-Olivier Dupin). Scherzo in C minor, Wo02. Geistliches Wiegenlied, Op. 91 No. 2. Bruch Violin Concerto No.1 in G minor, Op. 26. Dvorak Humoresque in G flat, B187 No.7 (arr. Franz Waxman). Joachim Romanze, Op. 2 No.1. Notturno, Op. 12. Schubert Auf dem Wasser zu singen, D774 (transcr. Hope). C. Schumann Romanze, Op. 22 No. 1.

Daniel Hope (violin/Cviola); with Anne-Sofie von Otter (mezzo); Sebastian Knauer, Bengt Forsberg (pianos); Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra/Sakari Oramo.

DG 477 9301 (full price, 1 hour 6 minutes). German texts and English/French translations included.

Website www.deutschegrammophon.com

Producer John West Engineers Mike Hatch, Dave Rowell. Date August 2010.

 

When I glanced at the track listing for this release, entitled ‘The Romantic Violinist – A celebration of Joseph Joachim’, my spontaneous reaction was one of instant disappointment. Any violinist keen to proselytize Joachim’s cause on disc could find enough music (much of it un-recorded) by this hugely influential figure to fill several CDs, whereas Daniel Hope’s latest offering for the yellow label opens with yet another recording of that mercilessly over-recorded violin concerto, Max Bruch’s First in G minor, Op. 26. Where was Joachim’s own splendid Violin Concerto in Hungarian Style, Op. 11 (written in 1853 and probably his finest work), or the affecting and idiomatic E minor Variations for violin and orchestra, dedicated to Sarasate?

Ironically, Joachim’s most frequently recorded compositions are his indispensable cadenzas for the Beethoven and Brahms concertos. Collectors seeking a more representative introduction to his output as a composer will find Elmar Oliveira’s version of the Hungarian Concerto, coupled with two fine orchestral works, the Hamlet, Op. 4 and Henry IV, Op. 7 Overtures, well worth seeking out. (It was released in 1991 on Pickwick IMP Masters MCD27 and subsequently reissued on Carlton Classics 6702092.)

Why, then, does Hope give us yet another Bruch G minor, albeit one which proves to be far from superfluous? History relates that Bruch’s original 1886 score was completely overhauled by Joachim, who premiered the revised (and now mandatory) version in Bremen in 1868. Still, whether or not that fact is in itself sufficient to warrant its inclusion here is open to debate. What is certain, however, is that the present account is superlative in every regard – so fine, in fact, that I’m inclined to overlook the omission of Joachim’s Hungarian Concerto, which no doubt he’d play equally well! This performance overflows with incident and rich musical detailing and, like James Ehnes’s live BBC TV performance with Gianandrea Noseda and the BBCPhilharmonic at the 2010 Proms, which many readers will doubtless recall with pleasure, it serves as a telling reminder of how able an orchestrator Bruch actually was. If Hope breathes new life into this ubiquitous war-horse, no less impressive is

the contribution of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo, who, as a fiddler himself, knows this piece inside out.

Oramo deliberately stresses the violas’ tremolando entry at 1’35” in the opening movement (a detail lost to the ear in many recordings) and Hope’s unexpected yet tremendously effective finger-substitution at l’ 54″ made me gasp with surprise upon first hearing. The horn crescendo at 2’05” often goes unobserved, too, and the lovely counter theme for first oboe (3’15”) during the lyrical second episode is beautifully managed here. Oramo ushers in the noble second subject of the AdagiO (Richard Strauss must have had this theme in mind when he wrote his Alpensirifonie) with dignified understatement, and the cellos’ counter melody supporting the solo line at 2’48” comes across as the composer might have wished. The finale dazzles, rounding out a captivating and insightful reading that probably deserves to be here after all!

Oramo and the Stockholmers join Hope again in Marc-Olivier Dupin’s orchestrations of two Hungarian Dances by Brahms, originally transcribed for violin and piano by Joachim himself, in which form purists inight well have preferred them here. Yet these arrangements return to the spirit if not the letter of Joachim’s own versions; both are tremendously well played and it would be hard to imagine anybody failing to respond to their visceral energy and momentum. By contrast, the Waxman arrangement of the familiar Dvorak Humoresque has an old- world charm which left me wondering if Hope had ever seen the heavily stylized 1926 film footage of Mischa Elman playing the piece with piano accompaniment.

Joachim’s Op. 12 Notturno in A for violin and orchestra (1858) is at once substantial and original and receives a glowing performance. Joachim introduced the young Brahms to the Schumanns in 1853, ‘and it’s good to find the inclusion of Clara’s Romanze, Op, 22 No.1, a work they often performed together. The so-called ‘F-A-E Sonata’ takes its name from Joachim’s personal motto Jrei aber einsam (‘free but solitary’) and was written for him in the same year by Robert Schumann, Albert Dietrich and Brahms, whose C minor Scherzo is arrestingly realized by Hope and pianist Sebastian Knauer. It’s also a pleasure to hear Anne-Sofie von Otter in one of Brahms’s songs with obbligato viola.

Finally, it’s worth noting that Joachim, who survived into the recording era, can be heard on several historical reissues from Pearl, Opal Recordings and Testament. Nevertheless, as one listens to him now it’s hard to reconcile his slow, wideamplitude vibrato, frequent use of portamentos and often wayward intonation with the towering musical figure to whom Daniel Hope pays affectionate tribute in this release. This is an exceptionally fine issue, repertoire concerns notwithstanding.

Michael Jameson

THE ROMANTIC VIOLINIST
BBC Music Magazine, 15.05.2011

Bruch: Violin Concerto in G minor;
plus works by Brahms, Dvorak,
Joachim, Schubert & C Schumann

Daniel Hope (violin, viola). Sebastian
Knauer, Bengt Forsberg (piano). Anne- Sofie von Otter (mezzo-soprano); Royal
Stockholm PO/Sakari Oramo
DG4779301 66:15 mins
BBC Music Direct £12.99

The centrepiece of Daniel Hope’s affectionate tribute to the great Hungarian-born violinist Joseph Joachim, Bruch’s G minor Concerto, receives a warmly committed account from the soloist and the hugely responsive Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo. As in his recording of the Mendelssohn, Hope never takes this over-familiar score for granted and has imaginative things to say at every juncture. Some may feel the violin cadenzas at the opening are a bit too self-consciously elongated. Also the recording places Hope rather close to the microphone, making the double stop passage work in the first movement and finale sound unnecessarily aggressive.

The rest of the programme presents an attractive sequence of shorter pieces, including the only available recording ofJoachim’s Notturno for violin and orchestra. Although hardly a major discovery, the inventive orchestral fabric excluding violins gives the work a distinctly autumnal hue. I was somewhat less convinced by the rather rough and ready string orchestral transcriptions of Brahms’s First and Fifth Hungarian Dances. Also why didn’t Hope give us all three of Clara Schumann’s Romances; and why omit the first of Brahms’s glorious Op. 91 songs? The final item, Dvorak’s ubiquitous Humoresque as arranged Hollywood-style by Franz Waxman, seems idiomatically out of place here, though Hope’s performance is certainly seductive.

Erik Levi

PERFORMANCE ****
RECORDING ****

Romantic Violinist ****
Classic Fm, 14.05.2011

Music bV Bruch, Joachim, Dvorak, Brahms, Schumann & Schubert
Daniel Hope (vln), Various artists
Orchestral: DG 477 9301

The Music Joseph Joachim, the binding force uniting the various pieces in this fine selection, was one of the greatest violinists of the 19th century, a gifted composer in his own right and a consulted expert who advised some of the greatest composers ofthe age.

The Performances The major offering here is Bruch’s evergreen First Violin Concerto, which Daniel Hope plays with cliche-free, heartfelt intensity. He radiates espressivo allure in Joachim’s own Romanza and Nottumo, captures the simmering passion of two Joachim arrangements of Brahms’s Hungarian Dances, and the heart-warming whimsy of Dvorak’s beloved Humoresque. Anne Sofie von Otter makes a welcome guest appearance in Brahms’s adorable Geistliches Wiegenlied, which also gives Hope a chance to display his considerable skills as a viola player.

The Verdict The Joachim connection is fascinating, and Hope plays each piece as a musical gem in its own right, although experienced straight through this feels slightly disjointed. For a more cohesive musical experience try Hope’s stunning Air: A Baroque Journey (DG 477 8094).

JULIAN HAtLOCK

musikalisch anrührend schön, setzt auf Empathie und Emphase
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 09.04.2011

“………wie schnell sich einem das Herz erwärmt, wenn man einen Geigenton hört, der kehlig und vibratoreich unseren eingeübten Vorstellungen von romantischer Innigkeit entspricht, merkt man mit dem ersten Einsatz von Daniel Hope im g-Moll-Violinkonzert von Max Bruch. “The Romantic Violinist – A Celebration of Joseph Joachim” heißt dieses Album(…….) – dieser Ton bohrt sich mit einer verschwenderischen Schwärmerei ins Ohr, wie man das seit Fritz Kreisler und Jascha Heifetz gerne zu haben gelernt hat….

…diese leicht sentimental getönte CD ist musikalisch anrührend schön. Sie setzt auf Empathie und Emphase……….Das Notturno für Violine und Orchester op. 12 ist ein echter Schatz. Sakari Oramo, der das Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra leitet, bestätigt in dieser Aufnahme erneut seinen Ruf, gegenwärtig zu den sensibelsten Begleitern unter den Dirigenten zu gehören.”

Text: F.A.Z., 09.04.2011, Nr. 84 / Seite 37

Hommage an Joseph Joachim
Rondo II/2011, 01.04.2011

Daniel Hope – The Romantic Violinist
The Times, 26.03.2011

The Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim may have died in 1907, but he’s a few clicks away on YouTube and lives again in Daniel Hope’s diverting celebration of the musician’s romantic art with Sakari Oramo and the Stockholm Philharmonic.

Hope’s way with the Bruch: Violin Concerto No 1 is lively, burning with gypsy passion. Temperatures calm down for Joachim’s own Romanze and his equally endearing Notturno. Joachim’s friend Brahms pops up; so does mezzo Anne Sofie von Otter.

Geoff Brown
(Deutsche Grammophon; out now)

The Romantic Violinist: A Celebration of Joseph Joachim
The National, 23.03.2011

Daniel Hope (violin, viola), Sakari Oramo (cond), Anne Sofie von Otter (mezzo-soprano), Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra
(Deutsche Grammophon)

While we know composers of the past through their written works, it is hard to conjure up the worlds of great performers such as Niccolò Paganini or Ignaz Moscheles simply because there is nothing to prove their brilliance other than the anecdote and adulation of their contemporaries.

In Joseph Joachim’s case, we do have a few crackling recordings from the turn of the 20th century, by which time he was elderly and probably past his best. Yet this was a violinist who not only composed his own works but was also a huge influence on some of the greatest composers of the mid- and late-19th century, including Clara and Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms and Max Bruch.

Indeed, such an important figure was he that he was given free reign to amend and adapt the Bruch violin concerto that opens the album, No. 1 in G minor, to the extent that Bruch himself feared that listeners would believe the piece to have been composed by Joachim.

The young South African/British violinist Daniel Hope, fascinated by Joachim’s immense presence in the history of German Romanticism, has tried to bring together those works that reflect his influence the most – the Bruch, two Hungarian Dances by Brahms that Joachim regularly performed with the composer himself, and a Schubert Lied that had been performed by Joachim’s wife, the mezzo-soprano Amalie Schneeweiss (performed here by Anne Sofie von Otter).

Hope even taught himself the viola especially to play Brahms’s Geistliches Wiegenlied, which had been reworked from a lullaby to celebrate the birth of Joachim’s first child. The addition of a Romanza and a Notturne written by Joachim himself reveal the violinist as a tender, sensitive composer. Luckily, Hope’s performances are just as tender, with none of the histrionics that sometimes accompany the Romantic canon, making this a genuinely interesting collection.

From Abu Dhabi

Daniel Hope und “The romantic violinist”
www.ndr.de/kultur/klassik, 22.03.2011

“The romantic violinist”
Daniel Hope, Violine und Viola
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, Ltg.: Sakari Oramo
Sebastian Knauer, Klavier
Anne-Sofie von Otter, Mezzosopran, Bengt Forsberg, Klavier

Gerade hat Daniel Hope sein Buch “Toi toi toi – Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik” bei uns auf NDR Kultur vorgestellt, da kommt eine neue CD des Geigers heraus – “A Celebration of Joseph Joachim”. Nach Ausflügen in die Welt des Barock stellt uns Daniel Hope jetzt den “romantischen Geiger” Joseph Joachim vor, es ist eine “Hommage an einen weitgehend vergessenen musikalischen Giganten”, so Hope. Eine Hommage an den Geiger, der mit Schumann und Brahms befreundet war, der in Hannover wirkte und auch selbst komponiert hat.

“Hommage für einen vergessenen musikalischen Giganten”

Das berühmte Violinkonzert von Max Bruch haben schon viele vor ihm gespielt – Daniel Hope stellt das Werk aber in einen inhaltlichen Zusammenhang, und so lässt man sich auch Altbekanntes gern gefallen. Den einen oder anderen mag es erstaunen, dass Hope für sein Porträt keines der von Joachim komponierten Violinkonzerte ausgewählt hat, auch keines der großen Violinkonzerte, die ihm gewidmet sind, aber Hope sagt es selbst – es gibt genug Material für 20 CDs.

Daniel Hope und das Königliche Philharmonische Orchester Stockholm

Bruch hat sein Violinkonzert nicht Joachim gewidmet, nahm aber für eine spätere Fassung die Anregungen des Geigers auf. Die Interpretation von Daniel Hope zusammen mit dem Königlichen Philharmonischen Orchester Stockholm und Sakari Oramo ist großartig – mit allem Herzblut und Risiko gespielt, phantasievoll, Solist und Orchester wunderbar harmonierend.

Von dem Komponisten Joachim hat Daniel Hope zwei kleinere Werke ausgewählt – eine Romanze und ein Notturno. Dazwischen setzt Hope Ungarische Tänze und das Scherzo von Brahms, und tut zumindest dem Komponisten Joseph Joachim damit keinen Gefallen. Denn dem direkten Vergleich zu Brahms, zu Schubert, zu Dvorak können Joachims Werke nicht standhalten. Dafür sind aber dessen Bearbeitungen der berühmtesten Ungarischen Tänze seines Freundes Johannes Brahms für Geige und Orchester sehr unterhaltsam.

Daniel Hope erzählt anregende Geschichten

Dass man auch als Solist mit einem ganzen Sinfonieorchester Kammermusik machen kann, führen Daniel Hope und das Königliche Philharmonische Orchester Stockholm mit Sakari Oramo nicht nur in Bruchs Violinkonzert vor

Diese CD macht Spaß, da ist ein fabelhaft gespieltes Bruch-Violinkonzert, da ist das schöne Nebeneinander von Konzertantem und Kammermusik, und wir bekommen einen Eindruck davon, dass große Musiker im 19. Jahrhundert nie nur Interpreten waren. Der an dem legendären Yehudi Menuhin geschulte Daniel Hope erzählt anregende Geschichten – man hört ihm gern zu.

Vorgestellt von Raliza Nikolov

Daniel Hope: The Romantic Violonist
Codex Flores - Onlinemagazin für alle Bereiche der klassischen Musik , 18.03.2011

Orchesterwerke, Kammermusikwerke, Lieder auf einer CD – das ist zumindest ungewöhnlich, auch wenn Konzept-Alben heute en vogue sind (man denke etwa an die aktuelle Scherbe Resonances der Pianistin Hélène Grimaud). Der Geiger Daniel Hope brennt Werke von Bruch, Clara Schumann, Brahms, Joseph Joachim, Schubert und Dvořák ins Polycarbonat, wir fühlen uns also durchweg romantisch. Wir lösen auf: Das Ganze ist ein Tribut an den Geiger Joseph Joachim, der in seiner Bedeutung für die Epoche unterschätzt werde – meint Hope – als Solist, der Werken wie Beethovens und Brahms’ Violinkonzert zum Durchbruch verhalf, als künstlerischer Berater, der etwa den Solopart des Violinkonzertes von Max Bruch mitgeschrieben hat, aber auch selber als Komponist und als Inspirationsquelle zahlreicher Schlüsselwerke der Epoche.

Gegenüber diesem Hans-Dampf-in-allen-Gassen mit ungarischen Wurzeln und wenig Berührungsängsten, wenn’s um den geschmacklich sicheren Herzschmerz geht, haben auch die Interpreten dieser CD keine Scheu. Das Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra steht unter der Leitung Sakari Oramos Hope in nichts nach, geht es darum, Romantisches auch romantisch klingen zu lassen, glutvoll und beseelt. Den Solisten, der nicht den glatten, feinen und präzisen Klang sucht, sondern auch das Rohe kochen lässt, ist es in der interpretatorischen Disziplin in Sachen Dynamik und Phrasierung noch einen Tick voraus; es gibt ihm damit genau den Halt, den er braucht, um sich frei spielen zu können.

Zwei Ungarische Tänze von Brahms, die Nrn. 1 und 5 werden hier in der Orchestrierung von Marc-Olivier Dupin nicht abstrakt oder erhöht, sie massieren die waschechte Csárdas-Seele. Für das Geistliche Wiegenlied op. 91, Nr. 2 von Brahms greift Hope zur Viola, und zu ihm gesellt sich die Mezzosopranistin Sofie von Otter. Man versteht zwar kaum, was sie singt, zu Herzen geht das Kleinod aber auch so. Schuberts Lied «Auf dem Wasser zu singen» D 774 hat Hope für die CD selber für Klavier und Violine eingerichtet.

Abgeschlossen wir der Reigen seliger Geister von Dvořáks Kuschelklassik-Hit Humoreske, in einem Arrangement von Franz Waxman, das appellative Platitüden vermeidet. Man schliesst besonders das klavierähnliche Ding ins Herz, das da im Hintergrund ab und an vor sich hin perlt.

Eher diskret bleibt die Widmung Hopes. Er erinnert mit der CD an den 2010 mit 37 Jahren verstorbenen Kollegen Erik Houston, den das Schweizer Publikum vor allem dank einer denkwürdigen Interpretation von Schnittkes Concerto Grosso am Lucerne Festival in Erinnerung hat und der auch am Menuhin Festival Gstaad regelmässiger Gast war. Der Tribut ist stimmig: Denn auch wenn diese Musik zu Herzen geht – die romantischen Topoi von Vergänglichkeit, Tragik und Tod schwingen da immer mit. Ein wunderbares Album. (wb)

“The Romantic Violinist”
SONO Magazin, 18.03.2011

Joseph Joachim war im 19. Jahrhundert neben Teufelsgeiger Niccolò Paganini der berühmteste Violinist. Joachims Spiel muss so farbenreich und tiefgründig gewesen sein, dass große Komponisten wie Schumann, Brahms und Dvořák ihm Werke in die Finger schrieben. Mit einem musikalischen Porträt verbeugt sich nun der mit Schallplattenpreisen überhäufte Daniel Hope vor seinem Kollegen. Mit einem Kammermusik- und Orchesterprogramm, das von einer Violin-Romanze Clara Schumanns bis zur Dvořák-„Humoresque“ und dem berühmten Violinkonzert von Max Bruch reicht. Und selbst Joachim wäre vermutlich von Hopes feurigem und dann wieder herrlich ´singendem´ Violin-Ton begeistert gewesen. Dass Hope aber auch die tiefe Schwester der Geige, die Bratsche einfühlsam beherrscht, zeigt er in einem „Wiegenlied“ von Brahms. Reinhard Lemelle

Besonderheit: Daniel Hope hat sich für die Aufnahme das Bratschenspiel selbst beigebracht.

Tausendsassa Daniel Hope schwelgt in Romantik
Sueddeutsche Zeitung, 17.03.2011

Berlin (dpa) – Stargeiger Daniel Hope gilt als Tausendsassa: Der in Südafrika geborene Brite mit irischem Pass war lange Mitglied des legendären Beaux Arts Trios, wirkte aber auch an Plattenaufnahmen von Sting mit.

Er liebt alte Musik und fördert zugleich mit eigenen Kompositionsaufträgen zeitgenössische Künstler. Zwei Jahre nach seinem Barock-Album «Air» schlägt der 36-Jährige nun wieder ganz neue Saiten an: Seine CD «The Romantic Violinist» ist eine Hommage an den ungarisch-österreichischen Geiger Joseph Joachim (1831-1907).

«Joachim ist eine der faszinierendsten Persönlichkeiten der Musikgeschichte», sagt Hope in einem Gespräch mit der Nachrichtenagentur dpa. «Mit diesem Album habe ich versucht, ein musikalisches Porträt dieses großartigen Geigers zu entwerfen. Wo immer er hinging, hat er die Menschen inspiriert.»

Im Mittelpunkt der Platte steht Max Bruchs Violinkonzert Nr. 1, das Joachim bearbeitet hat. Daneben gibt es Werke seiner Wegbegleiter Franz Schubert, Clara Schumann, Antonin Dvorak und Johannes Brahms. Für dessen «Geistliches Wiegenlied», das er 1864 zur Geburt von Joachims erstem Kind komponierte, brachte Hope sich auf einem geliehenen Instrument selbst das Bratschenspiel bei, Anne Sofie von Otter übernahm den Gesangspart.

«Ich liebe die romantische Epoche und ich bin jemand, der sehr in dieser nostalgischen Welt schwelgt», sagt Hope, dessen jüdische Urgroßeltern bis zur Nazi-Zeit in Berlin-Dahlem lebten und in den gleichen Kreisen wie Joachim verkehrten. «Die Geschichte meiner Familie ist etwas, was mich nach wie vor sehr beschäftigt. Und durch dieses Projekt hatte ich das Gefühl, dass ich meiner Familie, meinen Urgroßeltern etwas näher bin.»

Die Suche nach den Spuren seiner Vorfahren in Berlin hatte Hope schon in seinem zusammen mit der Autorin Susanne Schädlich verfassten Buch «Familienstücke» (2007) geschildert, das ein Bestseller wurde. Obwohl selbst katholisch getauft und evangelisch konfirmiert, fühlt er sich der jüdischen Geschichte besonders verpflichtet. In seiner neuen Aufgabe als Künstlerischer Direktor der Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern will er deshalb Versöhnung, Toleranz und Weltoffenheit besonders fördern.

Seine Liebe zur Musik hat Hope schon früh entdeckt. Seine Mutter war durch einen Zufall Halbtagssekretärin bei dem Geigenvirtuosen Yehudi Menuhin in London und nahm ihren Sohn jahrelang mit in dessen Haus. Lange «fiedelte» der kleine Daniel wie besessen mit Stricknadeln, ehe er als Sechsjähriger richtig Geige lernen durfte. Bei seinem ersten Auftritt flog der Rotschopf noch hinterrücks durch eine Schwingtür von der Bühne.

Das kindliche Missgeschick schildert Hope in seinem neuen Buch «Toi, toi, toi! Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik», das fast zeitgleich mit der Platte erschien. Ähnlich wie sein Konzertführer «Wann darf ich klatschen?» vor zwei Jahren ist auch dies ein leichtfüßiges, beschwingtes Büchlein ohne Anspruch auf allzuviel Tiefgang.

Wir erfahren von Beethovens Ausrastern, Bachs Arrest und Anna Netrebkos geplatzter Korsage. Und auch das einstige Wunderkind Joseph Joachim kommt vor: Wegen angeblich zu steifer Bogenführung hatte sein Wiener Geigenlehrer den Neunjährigen einst als hoffnungslosen Fall weggeschickt. Erst ein Lehrerwechsel half.

«Das Problem bei mir ist die Überdosis an kreativer Energie», sagt Hope zu seinem Arbeitspensum. «Da brauche ich manchmal einfach eine Stopptaste.»

Geiger, Erzähler, Erzieher
Salzburger Nachrichten, 15.03.2011

ERNST P. STROBL (SN).

Daniel Hope. Der Ire südafrikanischer Herkunft ist Stargeiger, gab jüngst eine neue „Romantik“-CD heraus und schrieb wieder ein Buch.

Als er vor wenigen Jahren das Buch „Familienstücke“ herausbrachte, staunte man nicht schlecht. Wie ein gelernter Historiker hat Daniel Hope die faszinierende Geschichte seiner Herkunft akribisch erforscht, man erfuhr nicht nur über die bunten, teils dramatischen Lebensgeschichten der irischen und deutsch-jüdischen Vorfahren, sondern auch viel über das 19. und 20. Jahrhundert.

In Südafrika geboren, in England aufgewachsen, hat es Daniel Hope zu einem weltweit gefragten Geiger gebracht, der nicht nur TV-Shows moderiert, sondern als Mitglied des Beaux-Arts-Trios bis zu dessen Auflösung 2008 und als Solist weltweit für Klassik auf höchstem Niveau warb, an Plattenaufnahmen von Sting mitwirkte und überhaupt mit den Mitgliedern von „Police“ musizierte und keinerlei Hemmungen vor jeglichen Grenzüberschreitungen hat.

Im Wiener Konzerthaus gestaltet Daniel Hope gemeinsam mit seinem Pianisten Sebastian Knauer eine Matinee-Reihe, zu der Gäste wie Mirjam Weichselbraun eingeladen sind, mit der er schon die TV-Show „Die besten Opern aller Zeiten“ gestaltete. Zu ausgewählten Themen wie „Wann darf ich klatschen?“ oder „Von Regeln und Ritualen“ gibt es passende Live-Musik samt erläuternden und durchaus erheiternden Moderationen (nächster Termin 15. Mai). Hope scheint eine aufklärerische Mission anzutreiben.

Gerne wendet sich Daniel Hope, wie er im SN-Gespräch in Wien sagte, an junge Leute, etwa bei der TV-Sendung ARTE Lounge, auch Schulprojekte wie das des deutschen Pianisten Lars Vogt unterstützt er leidenschaftlich. Wien hat er übrigens als Wunsch-Wohnsitz im Auge, hier wohnt auch mittlerweile seine Mutter, die in zweiter Ehe mit einem Österreicher verheiratet ist.

Indirekt ist die Mutter „schuld“ an der Geigerkarriere, denn nachdem die Familie – der Vater war Schriftsteller – wegen der Apartheid von Südafrika nach England gezogen war, trat die Mutter eine Stelle als Privatsekretärin von Yehudi Menuhin an und wurde später dessen Managerin. Seit dem 5. Lebensjahr ist Hope nun Geiger, mittlerweile ist er an einem Festival in den USA als künstlerischer Leiter tätig und auch in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern weitet er seine Mitarbeit bei einem Festival aus. Die lange Erfahrung bringt der vielseitig interessierte Geiger auch in sein neues Buch „Toi, toi, toi!“ ein, das sich um „Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik“ dreht.

Da sind eigene Pannen und Hoppalas notiert, die Hope humorvoll schildert, wie auch Geschichten von eingeschlafenen oder besoffenen Musikern, dramatische Ereignisse wie Brandkatastrophen, eine große Zahl lustiger Anekdoten berühmter Musiker: lauter interessanter Lesestoff.

Joseph Joachim spielt keine Rolle in dem Buch, ist aber der heimliche Star der neuen CD von Daniel Hope. Der in Kittsee geborene Geiger (1831–1907) beeinflusste Komponisten wie Max Bruch und Johannes Brahms, die teils für ihn komponierten oder seinen Rat suchten.

„Der romantische Violinist“ heißt die CD (Deutsche Grammophon), enthält natürlich das Violinkonzert von Max Bruch mit dem Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, kurze Stücke von Brahms und Joachim und Brahms’ „Geistliches Wiegenlied“ mit Anne-Sofie von Otter – und da spielt Daniel Hope sogar Bratsche.

Album of the Week: Daniel Hope: ‘The Romantic Violinist’
WQXR 105.9fm-The Classical Music Station of NYC, 13.03.2011

Few classical music fans can name a piece written by Joseph Joachim (1831-1907) yet most almost certainly know the music he inspired and championed. Without the Hungarian violinist-composer we wouldn’t have the Brahms Concerto in D or the Bruch Concerto in G minor, two of the pillars of the modern symphonic repertoire. Concertos by Dvorak and Schumann, as well as the Brahms Double Concerto also bear Joachim’s stamp.

The British violinist Daniel Hope is setting out to present an even fuller picture of Joachim’s creative legacy with “The Romantic Violinist,” a collection that includes pieces dedicated to him and two of his own compositions. It’s our Album of the Week.

Born into a Jewish family in Hungary, Joseph Joachim (pronounced ‘Yo-ACH-him’) became venerated as a thinking man’s answer to more populist virtuosos like Niccolò Paganini and Pablo de Sarasate. While studying under Felix Mendelssohn as a boy, Joachim took up the Beethoven Violin Concerto and his performance, at age 12, caused such a sensation that he effectively restored the forgotten piece to the repertoire. He later became a staunch advocate for Brahms and introduced the composer to Robert and Clara Schumann. Over a long career, Joachim championed a serious brand of music-making that left a lasting mark on the performance tradition.

Hope opens the album with a burnished reading of the Bruch Concerto No. 1 in G minor, a piece Joachim completely revised and improved. Four short pieces by Brahms are included, most surprisingly, the song “Geistliches Wiegenlied” (“Holy Cradle Song”), in which Hope takes up the viola and is joined by mezzo-soprano Anne-Sofie von Otter. Joachim was also a composer in his own right, with over 14 published works to his credit, and Hope applies a big romantic tone to two of his shorter gems: the youthful Romanze and the mature Notturno for violin and orchestra.

Rounding out the program is a lovely (if incongruous) Schubert song transcription by Hope and even Dvorak’s Humoresque in a glowing arrangement by Franz Waxman. Also joining Hope on the album are the pianists Sebastian Knauer and Bengt Forsberg and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under the sensitive direction of Sakari Oramo.

The Romantic Violinist
Daniel Hope, violin
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra
Sakari Oramo, conductor
Deutsche Grammophon

The Romantic Violinist: A Celebration of Joseph Joachim – Review
The Observer, 13.03.2011

by Stephen Pritchard

This tribute to a giant of the 19th-century violin is an engaging run around both Joachim the performer and Joachim the composer. Big-hearted Daniel Hope, backed by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic under Sakari Oramo, seems equally at home in the wide open spaces of Bruch’s violin concerto (which the master totally revised and improved) or the warm intimacy of Joachim’s own delightful Romanze for violin and piano. Hope maintains that the wonderfully lyrical Notturno Op 12 is the epitome of the term “romantic” – touching and inspiring rather than wild and passionate – and in his hands it’s hard to disagree.

Saiten, Pech und Pannen
Die Welt Online, 11.03.2011

Stargeiger Daniel Hope und Hamburger Autor Wolfgang Knauer legen Buch über Missgeschicke in der Welt der Musik vor.

Am Anfang war die Panne. Seine Karriere begann für Daniel Hope im sonnigen Alter von sechs Jahren mit einem Reinfall, der zugleich Rausfall war. Als er gemeinsam mit geigenden Kameraden den Purcell-Saal des Londoner South Bank Centres betrat, um den stolzen Eltern seine frühe Fingerfertigkeit vorzuführen, wurde er direkt vor der Schwingtür platziert. Da lehnte er sich kurz zu weit nach hinten, die Tür gab nach, er verlor den Halt und flog samt Geige rückwärts, während sich die Tür sofort wieder schloss. “Das hätte das Ende meiner Karriere sein können, hätte ich mir das so richtig zu Herzen genommen. Ich habe es aber als Chance begriffen, bin von der Bühne verschwunden und wieder aufgetaucht.”

Seit der initialen Katastrophe seines Geigerlebens sind 30 Jahre vergangen, Hope, einst Meisterschüler von Yehudi Menuhin, zählt zu den Stars der Szene. Jetzt bringt er sein Buch “Toi, Toi, Toi – Pannen und Katastrophen in der Musik” heraus, um nicht nur höchst launig von eigenen Blackouts, gerissenen Geigensaiten und verpassten Auftritten zu berichten. Hope gelingt es vielmehr, gemeinsam mit Co-Autor Wolfgang Knauer, einst Kulturchef im NDR-Hörfunk, Musikgeschichte in Form von Musikergeschichten zu erzählen: konzise und spannend.

Bei der überaus vergnüglichen und kurzweiligen Lektüre des Bandes lacht man nicht nur laut auf, man erfährt Erhellendes. Hope erläutert seinen Ansatz: “Wir haben diese riesige Kultur-Schatzkiste, die muss man für die Menschen aufschließen, da ihnen sonst die Zeit, Geduld und Konzentration fehlen, selbst nach dem Schlüssel zu suchen.” Er berichtet, wie schwer es war, aus dem gigantischen Repertoire von Anekdoten auszuwählen: “Es sollte ja nicht nur Slapstick sein. Es geht auch um Kriege, um Aufruhr und um die unglaubliche Wirkung, die Musik auf Menschen hatte. Wir können uns doch heute nicht mehr vorstellen, dass man für eine Sonate ins Gefängnis kommen konnte, wie damals in der Sowjetunion.”

Natürlich weiß Daniel Hope, wie schön Schadenfreude sein kann und dass Musikfreunde sich am besten an die Momente des Scheiterns erinnern: “Dann kann man sich sagen: ‘Gott sei Dank ist mir das nicht passiert.’ Doch dann entdeckt man in vielen Geschichten auch neue Seiten der großen Komponisten, die ja sonst nichts als Halbgötter für uns sind. Ohne diese Meister zu entblößen möchte ich deren menschliche Züge zeigen. Wer würde schon glauben, dass Bach mal im Gefängnis war?”

Das Zusammenspiel von Musik und Politik kommt anschaulich zum Ausdruck, so in den Kapiteln über Richard Wagner und die Revolution, die geplatzte Uraufführung von Hans Werner Henzes “Das Floß der Medusa” im studentenbewegten Jahr 1968 oder den Besuch des spanischen Königspaars in Hamburg: Als die Majestäten zur Aufführung der “Zauberflöte” nicht pünktlich erschienen, entschied Christoph von Dohnányi, seinerzeit Intendant der Staatsoper, nach einer Viertelstunde des Wartens: “Wir sind Republikaner, wir fangen an!” Hopes größtes Verdienst aber ist, dass er uns in seinem Buch Einblick in das verschlossene Seelenleben von Musikern gewährt: “Schlimm genug, wenn man eine falsche Note spielt, noch schlimmer ist es, wenn einem musikalisch eine Phrase nicht glückt. Fehler nimmt man nämlich selbst wie durch ein Vergrößerungsglas wahr. Die ganze Nacht verfolgt einen diese eine Phrase, die danebengegangen ist.”

Ob in seinem Buch, auf der Bühne (am 13. April in der Laeiszhalle), oder auf CD (am 18. März erscheint seine neue Aufnahme “The Romantic Violinist” als Hommage an Joseph Joachim) – Daniel Hope ist ein begnadeter Vermittler von Musik.

History’s most influential violinist?
Time Out, 02.03.2011

Re-evaluating Joachim
Classical Music magazine, 01.03.2011



2010


Violinist Daniel Hope champions Nazi victims
Los Angeles Times, 04.04.2010

By David Ng

Violinist Daniel Hope is a passionate champion of composers who were victims of the Nazis.

 

Describing violinist Daniel Hope is no easy task.

There is first the matter of his nationality. The musician was born in South Africa, raised in England and now travels with an Irish passport even though he makes his home in Hamburg, Germany.

Hope is a much in-demand soloist these days, but the violin isn’t his only vocation. He devotes significant time to climate-change causes and is a published author with two books under his belt — one about concert-going etiquette and another about his family, which he wrote in German.

Perhaps his most passionate activity — and the one that brings him to L.A. this week — is his fascination with composers whose careers suffered at the hands of the Nazi Party.

On Wednesday at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, Hope will perform a concert of pieces by Erwin Schulhoff, a Czech composer who died at a concentration camp in Bavaria in 1942. The free concert, which will feature members of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, will include Schulhoff’s Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Duo for Violin and Cello. (E-mail olga@orel foundation.org to request tickets.)

“The music, regardless of the story connected to it, is powerful,” Hope said recently. “You don’t have to know the story but it makes it richer if you do.”

Schulhoff was a composer who showed great promise but found that his life and career were in danger after the German occupation of Czech territory. The composer, who was both Jewish and a communist, applied for Soviet citizenship with the aim to emigrate. But he was eventually arrested and imprisoned by the Nazis.

His music contains a multitude of influences, including modernism and even jazz. “He was one of the first composers to incorporate jazz elements. Very few composers can manage the synthesis,” Hope said.

Wednesday’s concert is being co-organized by the Orel Foundation, an organization that seeks to spotlight music by composers whose careers were impacted by the cataclysmic events of the mid-20th century.

Hope said his interest in music from the period stems from an incident about 15 years ago when he was driving and heard a string trio on the radio.

“I pulled over to hear the name of the composer — it was Gideon Klein,” Hope recalled. “I didn’t know who he was and I Googled it when I got back home.”

And so was born a new personal obsession. Since then, he has organized concerts and programs around the world to showcase music by composers including Schulhoff, Klein and Hans Krasa. Hope said part of his motivation is genetic — his grandparents were German Jews who were “kicked out of Germany and fled in a variety of directions.”

Hope began playing the violin at age 4 after his family relocated from South Africa to London. Hope’s father had difficulty finding work, and the family was running out of money. Hope’s mother took a job as a secretary for violinist Yehudi Menuhin and ended up working for him for more than 20 years.

Hanging around the office with his mother prompted Hope to take up the instrument. “I simply announced I wanted to be a violinist,” he said. “Neither of my parents were musicians. But I guess I had a strong will.”

Hope, 35, spends much of the year traveling for concerts, festivals and recordings. (He said he’s married but has no children.) Recent projects include a video blog on his official website, where he chronicles his international travels, including a meeting with pop star Sting and a performance at Berlin’s Reichstag.

On Tuesday, Hope is scheduled to teach a master class at USC that is open to the public. Later this year, he will perform in a climate change concert for the Prince of Wales’ Rainforests Project.

Hope will also continue to work on book projects. “My father was a writer, and I was encouraged to express my opinions,” he said. “It’s challenging but we need people to discuss classical music all the time.”

 

Mit Bach und Schubert im Badezimmer
NZZ am Sonntag, 07.02.2010

Der britische Geiger Daniel Hope ist ein Phänomen. Er brilliert als Solist und Kammermusiker, organisiert Festivals und schreibt so vergnügliche wie kluge Bücher. Die Zeit zum Üben stiehlt er sich nachts im Hotel.
Von Manfred Papst

Postkartenwetter in Ober bayern. Still liegt Schloss Elmau im verschneiten Tal. Hoch über der weit läufigen Anlage, die 1916 vom Theologen Johan nes Müller als Begegnungszentrum für seine Künstlerfreunde eröffnet wurde und heute als Hotel dient, glänzt der Wettersteinkamm in der Wintersonne. Es ist eiskalt.
Mit der Geduld und Höflichkeit des grossen Künstlers posiert Daniel Hope für den Fotografen. Mit seiner Geige unterm Arm in den Schnee hinaustreten will er allerdings nicht. Die Kälte könnte dem Instrument schaden. Es ist zwar keine Stradivari oder Guarneri del Gesù, aber immerhin eine Gennaro Gagliano von 1769. «Ich habe sie von meinem Mentor Yehudi Menuhin», erzählt Hope. «Er überliess sie mir, als ich fünfzehn Jahre alt war, und nach fünfzehn weiteren Jahren hatte ich sie schliesslich abbezahlt.»

Ins Schloss Elmau ist Hope gekommen, um im Rahmen der Kammermusiktage mit seinem langjährigen Klavierpartner Sebastian Knauer einen Duoabend zu geben. Anderntags geht es um sechs Uhr morgens schon weiter nach Hamburg, wo Hope einen seiner Wohnsitze hat – die anderen sind in London und Wien -, und von dort weiter rund um die ganze Welt.
Der umtriebige Künstler, der nicht nur seine Karriere als Solist verfolgt, sondern auch Festivals in Deutschland und den USA organisiert, Bücher schreibt und für Radio und Fernsehen arbeitet, ist überall und nirgends zu Hause. Das kann nicht erstaunen, wenn man seine Herkunft betrachtet.

Von Südafrika nach England
Geboren wurde Daniel Hope 1974 im südafrikanischen Durban. Seine Vorfahren waren einerseits irische Katholiken, die während des zweiten Burenkriegs mittellos nach Südafrika kamen und es dort zu Wohlstand brachten, andererseits deutsche Juden, die als Industrielle in der Weimarer Republik zum Grossbürgertum gehörten, während des Dritten Reiches aber unter Zurücklassung ihrer ganzen Habe fliehen mussten und ebenfalls in Südafrika eine neue Existenz aufbauten. Dort fanden die beiden scheinbar so gegensätzlichen Familien zusammen. Als Daniel ein halbes Jahr alt war, kehrten sein Eltern, die sich als Gegner der Apartheid in Südafrika zunehmend fremd fühlten, nach Europa zurück. Sie gingen nach England. Der Vater war ein damals noch erfolgloser Schriftsteller, die Mutter übernahm alle möglichen Arbeiten, um die Familie über Wasser zu halten. Durch einen Glücksfall lernte sie Yehudi Menuhin kennen, der sie als Sekretärin einstellte, aber bald schon ihr Potenzial erkannte und sie zu seiner Managerin machte. Sie organisierte seine Auftritte, reiste mit ihm, war sein Mädchen für alles. Die Kinder nahm sie nach Möglichkeit mit. Eine Geschichte wie im Märchen.

Glücklich in Saanen
Der kleine Daniel und sein Bruder wuchsen also in einem musikfreundlichen Klima auf. Sie krabbelten unter dem Flügel eines Weltstars herum, sahen prominente Besucher aus und ein gehen, sassen ehrfürchtig im Konzertsaal. Die intensivsten Erinnerungen hat Hope an die Mauritius-Kirche in Saanen bei Gstaad, wo jährlich das Menuhin-Festival stattfand. «Wir verbrachten jeden Sommer im Berner Oberland, bis ich 18 oder 19 war», erzählt er, «und die herrliche Landschaft verband sich für mich mit dem sakralen Raum und der göttlichen Musik, die Meister wie Rostropowitsch und Kempff dort spielten.» Als neugieriger, offener Geist lud Menuhin aber auch Leute wie den indischen Sitar-Virtuosen Ravi Shankar und den französischen Swing-Geiger Stéphane Grappelli ein. Und hier hörte Hope zum ersten Mal – damals noch unter der Leitung von Edmond de Stoutz – das Zürcher Kammerorchester, das er überaus schätzt und mit dem er dieses Jahr zusammenarbeitet.
Ein Wunderkind war Daniel Hope nicht. Er liebte die Musik, aber sie flog ihm nicht einfach zu, und nirgends war er so unglücklich wie in der Menuhin School of Music, einem Internat in Surrey. Er starb schier vor Heimweh, hasste die rigiden Erziehungsmethoden und liess keinen Streich aus. «Ich spielte gern und fand mich ganz gut», erzählt er, «aber als ich etwa zwölf Jahre alt war und Gleichaltrige hörte, wurde mir bewusst, dass ich überhaupt nicht viel konnte. Ich sagte mir: Wenn etwas aus dir werden soll, musst du jetzt wirklich arbeiten. Das tat ich dann, und mit dem Üben wuchs die Freude.»

Das tägliche Spielen ist bis heute das A und O für Daniel Hope. «Ich bin nun einmal kein Fritz Kreisler, dem man nachsagt, er habe nie geübt», erklärt er. «Aber mein Glück ist es, dass ich keine speziellen Voraussetzungen zum Spielen brauche. Der kleinste Raum genügt mir. Die meiste Zeit des Jahres bin ich ja unterwegs. Dann gehe ich jeweils ins Bad meines Hotelzimmers, setze den Dämpfer auf die Geige und spiele. Ich störe niemanden und bin selig. Manchmal musiziere ich die ganze Nacht.»

Auch vor jedem Konzert probt Hope mehrere Stunden – egal, wie gut er das Programm schon kennt. Er muss es sich vergegenwärtigen, damit er auf dem Podium die volle Konzentration aufbringen kann. Lampenfieber gehört dazu. «Ich bin nie <cool>», sagt er. «Die letzte Viertelstunde vor dem Auftritt ist die Hölle. Man sitzt in der stickigen Garderobe, und es kribbelt im Bauch.»
Diese Aussage erstaunt bei einem Künstler, der schon früh vom Erfolg verwöhnt wurde, mittlerweile von Triumph zu Triumph eilt und selbst in der globalen Krise der Tonträgerindustrie zu den Happy Few gehört, die einen Exklusivvertrag mit einem renommierten Label haben. Aber Daniel Hope kokettiert nicht, wenn er die Musik als grausame Geliebte bezeichnet. Er gilt als Perfektionist. Um virtuose Selbstdarstellung geht es ihm jedoch nicht. Er sieht sich als Vermittler. Die Musik, wie sie vom Komponisten geschrieben und gemeint war, umzusetzen, ohne sich unnötig zwischen sie und den Zuhörer zu schieben: Das ist sein Anliegen. Seine Begeisterung gilt dem Werk, nicht der artistischen Prachtentfaltung. «Die Technik», sagt er, «ist natürlich die Voraussetzung. Man muss die schwierigen Stellen im Schlaf beherrschen. Der Zuhörer soll keine Anstrengung bemerken. Schnelligkeit per se bedeutet mir aber gar nichts. Die wahren Probleme der Gestaltung fangen erst an, wenn alle technischen Probleme gelöst sind.»

Sobald das Gespräch auf bestimmte Werke kommt, zeigt Hope sich als glühender Enthusiast. Über Schumann, Mendelssohn, Brahms spricht er mit dem gleichen Feuer wie über Schnittke, den er in dessen letzten Lebensjahren immer wieder besucht hat, oder über den weitgehend unbekannten Basler Komponisten Hermann Suter. Der deutschen Klassik ist er seit je verfallen. «Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven und Schubert können wir nur mit Dankbarkeit und Demut bestaunen», sagt er. Doch am Ende geht ihm nichts über Bach: «Er ist der tiefsinnigste und modernste Komponist, den ich kenne. Ich möchte seine Sonaten für Violine und Cembalo gern neu einspielen. Zwar gelten seine Solosonaten als Pièce de Résistance. Aber von ihnen gibt es so viele grossartige Aufnahmen. Henryk Szeryng mit seinem runden, kathedralenhaften Klang. Nathan Milstein mit seiner strengen Eleganz. George Enescu. Adolf Busch. Gidon Kremer. Ich finde aber auch die Aufnahmen mit barocken Instrumenten und Rundbogen interessant. Jeder Geiger sollte sich einmal auf diese Erfahrung einlassen. Rundbogen erlauben einem, Akkorde tatsächlich im Pianissimo zu spielen, wie Bach es vorschreibt. Mit dem modernen Bogen, den man über die Saiten reissen muss, geht das nicht.»

Gibt es auch Musik, die Daniel Hope kalt lässt? Er denkt lange nach. «In jedem Zeitalter gibt es langweilige Komponisten», sagt er schliesslich. «Aber die spiele ich einfach nicht. Und natürlich gibt es im kommerziellen Pop jede Menge ödes Zeug.» Den Pop als solchen möchte er aber keineswegs verteufeln. Prince und Sting, U2 und Depeche Mode findet er grandios.

Zu Daniel Hopes wichtigsten Erfahrungen als Musiker zählen die sechseinhalb Jahre, die er mit dem Beaux Arts Trio verbracht hat. Er war der letzte Geiger dieser legendären Formation, die unter der Ägide des Pianisten Menachem Pressler über ein halbes Jahrhundert lang bestand. «Jedes Ende hat etwas Trauriges», meint er dazu, «aber ich glaube, dass wir im richtigen Moment aufgehört haben. Wir haben vierhundert Konzerte gegeben, auf allen Festivals, in allen grossen Sälen der Welt. Und wir durften die schönste Musik überhaupt spielen. Beethoven. Schubert. Brahms. Für mich war das ein unbeschreibliches Glück.»

Derzeit kann Daniel Hope sich nicht vorstellen, nochmals in einer festen Kammermusikformation zu spielen. Zum einen lässt sich die Arbeit mit dem Beaux Arts Trio kaum toppen. Zum andern hat er zu viele andere Projekte. «Ich liebe Kammermusik», sagt er. «Ich kann ohne sie nicht leben. Ich werde sie zweifellos so oft wie möglich privat mit Freunden spielen. Aber als Ensemble an der Weltspitze mitzuwirken, die Interpretationen immer wieder zu perfektionieren – das geht nur, wenn man nichts anderes tut.»

Und Daniel Hope hat viele andere Pläne. CDs mit der Deutschen Grammophon. Konzerte als Solist – mit grossen Orchestern oder kleinen Ensembles, die er von der Geige aus leitet. Ambitionen als Dirigent hat er jedoch nicht. «Das überlasse ich lieber denen, die es können», sagt er. «Es gibt so viele grossartige Instrumentalisten, die mittelmässige Dirigenten geworden sind. Dirigent wird man nicht einfach so. Man muss es studieren. Die Harmonielehre beherrschen, Partitur lesen können, jedes Instrument in seiner Eigenart von Grund auf kennen.»
Mit diesen Worten verabschiedet Daniel Hope sich so freundlich wie bestimmt. Die Probe für den Abend ruft.

Fotos: Daniel Hope mit seiner Gagliano-Geige aus dem Jahr 1769 in der Bibliothek von Schloss Elmau. (15. Januar 2010)
SIMON KOY

Foto: Im Schnee nur ohne Geige: Daniel Hope.
SIMON KOY

Bücher, CD, Konzerte
Virtuos als Autor wie als Musiker

Daniel Hope hat zwei Bücher geschrieben: «Familienstücke», eine autobiografische Spurensuche (Rowohlt 2007, 320 S., Fr. 35.40) und «Wann darf ich klatschen?», einen heiteren Wegweiser für (vor allem junge) Konzertgänger (Rowohlt 2009, 253 S., Fr. 34.90). Für das renommierte Label Deutsche Grammophon, bei dem er exklusiv unter Vertrag ist, hat er Werke von Vivaldi über Mendelssohn bis zu Pavel Haas und Olivier Messiaen eingespielt. Im März 2010 geht er mit dem Zürcher Kammerorchester, das er von der Violine aus leitet, auf eine Tournee, die ihn am 10. 3. auch in die Tonhalle Zürich führt. Auf dem Programm stehen Werke von Bach, Händel, Telemann, Pachelbel, Biber, Vivaldi und anderen. (pap.)

 



2009


High notes in America’s Deep South
Guardian, 21.11.2009

Bluegrass, fado, opera and jazz fuse together at Georgia’s glorious medley of a festival. Kate Connolly falls in love with the music, history and mint juleps

Saturday, 21 November 2009, by Kate Connolly

The man who drives me from the airport to my hotel sings for much of the way; the receptionist croons Someone to Watch Over Me as I check in, and in one of the city’s elegant squares a workman performs spirituals in his lunch break, while another strums on his guitar. That Savannah is a city that lives for and thrives on music is clear to me before I even hit the Savannah Music Festival.

I arrive about a week into the proceedings, expecting a colourful apple-pie, foot-tapping mixture of bluegrass and jazz to country and swing; but the range and virtuosity of world-class music, from boogie to Cajun, fado to zydeco – a form of American folk – which I savour over the next few days, comes as something of a surprise.

Savannah, a coastal city in southwest Georgia, boasts a springtime arts marathon that has become a requisite port of call for a growing number of music lovers and musicians from around the world. For me, escaping a European winter to be spirited into this colourful and beguiling city, enveloped in dreamy Spanish moss, magnolia trees and pink and white azaleas, is an added bonus.

Stepping into the cool body of Wesley Monumental Methodist church I receive my first taste of what’s on tap for three weeks every year. With early spring light filtering through the stained-glass, pianist Sebastian Knauer hypnotises a lunchtime audience with Mendelssohn compositions, including Rondo Capriccioso, a quirky sonic portrait of a gondola splashing on the canals of Venice.

On the church steps festival director Rob Gibson, a dapper Georgia native who talks the syrupy southern talk, greets each audience member. Gibson, who founded the now legendary Jazz at the Lincoln Center series in New York in the early 90s before settling in Savannah following 9/11, is credited with rescuing the festival from provincial obscurity and turning it into one of the most talked-about music events in the States.

A former lecturer in American music history at the Juilliard School, he has created something of a musical laboratory where artists from different genres come together to experiment and fuse their sounds in a relaxed and stimulating atmosphere.

Gibson’s connections help lure some of the top names, including jazz greats Wynton and Jason Marsalis, Marcus Roberts and Wycliffe Gordon, English opera tenor Ian Bostridge and the Portuguese Fado singer Mariza.

The eclectic range of the programming is reflected in the 2010 schedule – the most artistically diverse line-up to date. There will be appearances by the Chinese piano wizard Lang Lang, celebrated Malian ngoni player Bassekou Kouyate, Wynton Marsalis’ Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, and Cherryholmes, a grammy-nominated family band, whose music has been described as “bluegrass on steroids”.

“I don’t know any other festival in the US that has the breadth of ours,” Gibson tells me over a salmon and spinach salad in Zunzi’s, a popular lunchtime restaurant. Savannah is the perfect backdrop for the festival, he says, describing it as “funky and elegant”, before cycling off to introduce the next concert.

Later, in the Congregation Mikveh Israel synagogue, one of the oldest in America, Cuban guitarist Manuel Barrueco captivates the audience with an exquisite range of renaissance lute works and Spanish dance music, elegantly wiping the perspiration from his brow in between pieces.

The unstuffy and jovial flavour of the festival is captured in that evening’s impromptu gathering of musicians, concert-goers and festival staff at the Circa 1875 wine bar on Whitaker Street. Over a cold beer, Daniel Hope, a British violinst who has been an artistic director of the festival since 2004, explains why he returns to perform year after year. “The experience is unique,” he says. “You spend a week or two weeks together, eating, drinking, going to salsa parties, exploring music, enjoying music and savouring each other’s company in a beautiful setting.”

The party later moves onto Pinkie Master’s, a grungy, moody jukebox joint, which locals affectionately refer to as Stinky Bastards, where Jimmy Carter is said to have stood on the bar and declared his intention to become US president.

The magic and mystique of Savannah which draws people like Hope, is expanded on by Sue Rendeno of Savannah Walks. During a gap between concerts Sue leads me on a fascinating journey through the city’s rich past. She takes me around the Gothic cemetery which, Savannahians boast, is one of the most haunted places in the world; to the old cloth hall that recently lost its trademark golden griffin to a speeding driver who bounced off its outspread wings, smashing it to smithereens; and points out whimsical details in the architecture such as the dolphin-shaped drain spouts.

Further reminders of the city’s musical DNA are the homes of the late composers James Pierpont – responsible for Jingle Bells – and Johnny Mercer, whose lengthy repertoire of hits included Moon River.

We stroll through several of the 21 squares shaded with majestic live oaks that are laid out like stepping stones across the city and connect the festival venues – all of which are easily reachable on foot.

These oases of calm – the most popular is Chippewa Square where a scene from Forrest Gump was shot – are a legacy of the city’s colonial past and the design of settlers who sailed up the Savannah river in early 1733. But it’s thanks to General Sherman, who spared Savannah during his scorched earth march through Georgia during the civil war, that they remain intact (Atlanta, by contrast, was flattened).

If you prefer two wheels to two legs, a good option is to return late at night, when the streets are empty, for a bike tour to experience the city’s highlight, Forsythe Park, with its grand, floodlit cast-iron fountain and check which of the well-documented ghosts are on the prowl.

Back at the festival, by the riverside, children’s big bands are playing to a huge crowd, as part of the Swing Central section of the fortnight’s events. This jazz band competition also lets the youngsters receive lessons from their musical heroes in the hope that they will be inspired to great things in the future.

That evening’s supper is black grouper – a deep-sea fish found along the Savannah coast – at the chic but unpretentious downtown restaurant Cha Bella. It sets me up for the 1920’s vauderville-style Lucas Theatre, which tonight features the New-York-based group Punch Brothers led by one of the world’s most celebrated mandolin players, Chris Thile. When this gaggle of nervously-energetic young string musicians appears I am expecting traditional bluegrass. Instead they dish up a mesmerising series of compositions, at once haunting and playful. A thunder storm rages outside as they sing about everything from a honey-haloed teacher, to sheep dogs, punch bowls and drunken girls combining pithy lyrics (‘the night was a chalkboard with a fingernail moon’) with witty banter. “You guys are really sweet, can we keep you?” says 28-year-old Thile, to the whoops of the females in the audience.

The following morning I bump into the Punch Brothers – undoubtedly my festival highlight. They’re in the B Matthew’s Eatery on East Bay Street, tucking into grits, scrambled eggs, wheatberry bread and hashbrowns, washed down with mimosas and mint juleps, before they embark on a four-hour drive to their next concert in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

“Shame we have to bail out, it’s just awesome here,” says Noam Pikelny, the band’s blue-eyed banjo player. “The town is full of a gorgeous line-up of artists, many of them our heroes, who we’d love to hear.”

Savannah’s eccentric air is perhaps most memorably evoked in John Berendt’s best-selling 1994 novel, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. The tale of murder, black and white magic and a bawdy black drag queen named The Lady Chablis, urges visitors not to take Savannah at face value: “You mustn’t be taken in by the moonlight and magnolias,” Berendt writes. “There’s more to Savannah than that.”

The elegant home of protagonist Jim Williams (played by Kevin Spacey in the 1997 film version directed by Clint Eastwood) can be found on Monterey Square. And the 51-year old Lady Chablis still occasionally performs at Club One on Jefferson Street.

The close proximity of everything in this city means you’re never far from the festival’s goings on. In the basement of the Avia hotel I eavesdrop on a laughter-filled rehearsal by Hope’s chamber music quintet which is practising Schubert’s Death and the Maiden.

Later that evening, in more sombre mood, they perform the Schubert followed by Elgar’s piano quintet in A minor at the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, which feels like a posh living room.

Afterwards musicians and festival staff seek some R ‘n’ R at a “roots ‘n’ twang” concert by the tiny-waisted, sweet-voiced Lovell Sisters. They charm the audience with their song Paulita Maxwell, a sassy tribute to Billy the Kid’s girlfriend and a great way to round off the evening.

When my festival run comes to an end I toy with the idea of extending my stay and foregoing two days in New York, so torn do I feel about leaving behind the charms of the Deep South. Its wide-ranging musical delights mean that Savannah competes with some of the very best music festivals in the world.

Add in, of course, its azaleas brushed by the warm breeze, the succulent Georgia white shrimp, and the steady flow of mint juleps, and as far as I’m concerned, there are plenty of compelling reasons to return.

Als gäb’s kein Urheberrecht
ZEIT ONLINE, 13.11.2009

Die neue CD des Geigers Daniel Hope erklärt, wie schon im 17. Jahrhundert unbekümmert gesampelt wurde. Dazu wirft sein Buch einen Blick hinter die Kulissen der Klassik-Branche.

von Volker Schmidt – 11. November 2009

Daniel Hope ist ein Mann der Bindestriche: ein südafrikanisch-britischer Geiger mit verworrenen irisch-deutsch-kosmopolitischen Wurzeln und ein beliebter Talk-Show-Gast. Er hat viel zu erzählen und tut es sehr amüsant. Von seiner Mutter Eleanor, erst Sekretärin, dann Managerin von Yehudi Menuhin, der dem kleinen Daniel viel beigebracht hat. Von Rabbinern unter den Ahnen, enteigneten Villen in Berlin und vom Südafrika der Apartheid, das Hopes Eltern 1975, gleich nach Daniels Geburt, aus Protest verließen.

Im Buch Familienstücke forschte der Geiger der Familiengeschichte nach; es wurde trotz seines etwas umständlichen Stils zum Bestseller. Jetzt beschäftigt Hope sich in einem Buch mit dem Konzertalltag vor und hinter den Kulissen: Wann darf ich klatschen? will kein Knigge sein, sondern Appetit machen auf Konzerte und die Angst nehmen vor den vielen Regeln, die einst geschaffen wurden, um ein elitäres Publikum vom Plebs abzugrenzen. Ihm zur Seite stand als Koautor Wolfgang Knauer, der langjährige Chef von NDR Kultur und Vater des Pianisten Sebastian Knauer, der Daniel Hope durch mehrere Konzertprogramme begleitete.

Auch Hopes neue CD ist von einiger Leichtigkeit geprägt, will die Eintrittsschwelle zu einer oft als spröde empfundenen Musikepoche senken: zum Barock. Für das Cover von Air. A Baroque Journey ließ sich der Violinist selbstironisch auf einer Klappleiter ablichten, den Geigenkasten in der Hand, vor wolkig gemaltem Hintergrund. Auf dem Buchtitel steht er vor dem gleichen Wölkchenhimmel, nur ohne Leiter.

Air begibt sich auf die Spuren vier wenig bekannter Komponisten des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts, Andrea Falconieri, Nicola Matteis, Johann Paul von Westhoff und Francesco Geminiani. Dazu kommt Musik, die diese vier beeinflusste, von eher volkstümlichen Werken bis zu Großkomponisten wie Pachelbel, Telemann, Händel und Bach, dessen wundervolle Air das Album beendet.

Wer bei Barockmusik zuerst an Bach denkt, an das Erstrahlen des Erhabenen aus dem Geist der Mathematik, der wird schwer schlucken an diesen Aufnahmen. Mit Schrammelgitarre, Trommel und Tamburin beginnt das Album und verdeutlicht so, dass die höfischen Canones, Gigues und Gagliardes allesamt der Tanzmusik entstammen, dem Humus, auf dem die musikalischen Höhepunkte der Zeit gediehen.

Für das Booklet durfte Roger Willemsen dem Geiger kluge Fragen stellen, und Hope sagt Dinge wie diese: “Viele der reisenden Musiker haben die Musik als tägliches Brot gesehen, als Gelderwerb. Sie wurden nicht angehimmelt wie später Mozart und Beethoven, sondern sie sahen sich als Dienstleister für König und Adel, vor allem mit ihrer Tanzmusik.”

Nach der großen europäischen Katastrophe, dem Dreißigjährigen Krieg, seinen Verheerungen und Seuchen, gerät im 17. Jahrhundert vieles in Bewegung. Hope sagt: “Der Umbruch fasziniert mich, man fühlt den Aufbruch aus der Renaissance-Zeit. Plötzlich treten Einzelpersonen hervor, Wandermusiker zum Beispiel, die durch Europa ziehen und ganz andere Musik mitbringen, wie Matteis. Es war eine Zeit der Bewegung. Diese Musik hat Vielfalt, Esprit, Vitalität, und vieles wurde durchaus auf den Effekt zugeschrieben. Man wollte gefallen, wollte wieder beauftragt werden”.

Der fast vergessene Westhoff etwa mag kein genialer Komponist gewesen sein, aber ein großer Violinvirtuose. Er perfektionierte Techniken für die gerade erst erfundene Geige, etwa das bariolage, bei dem der Bogen über alle vier Saiten streicht, und faszinierte damit Komponisten wie Antonio Vivaldi. Ohne die Praktiker des Tonsetzens, die von Hof zu Hof reisenden Unterhaltungskomponisten und Gebrauchsmusikanten, gäb’s keine Thomaskantoren, keine Messias-Chöre. Das ist die eine Lehre des Albums.

Der fast vergessene Westhoff etwa mag kein genialer Komponist gewesen sein, aber ein großer Violinvirtuose. Er perfektionierte Techniken für die gerade erst erfundene Geige, etwa das bariolage, bei dem der Bogen über alle vier Saiten streicht, und faszinierte damit Komponisten wie Antonio Vivaldi. Ohne die Praktiker des Tonsetzens, die von Hof zu Hof reisenden Unterhaltungskomponisten und Gebrauchsmusikanten, gäb’s keine Thomaskantoren, keine Messias-Chöre. Das ist die eine Lehre des Albums.

Diesmal verknüpft der Geiger im Buch und auf CD also nicht persönliche und familiäre Erinnerungen mit Musik wie in Familienstücke oder mit seiner Aufnahme des Mendelssohnschen Violinkonzerts, das er als Achtjähriger heimlich übte und so den Rauswurf aus der Musikschule riskierte. Jetzt erzählt er im Buch Wann darf ich klatschen? über den Musikbetrieb und was er so davon hält, reiht amüsante Anekdoten an programmatische Aussagen und streut ein paar Bratscher-Witze ein. Und auf der CD begibt er sich in die Musikgeschichte – gestaltet die Entdeckungsreise aber aus seinem subjektiven Blick, gibt ihr eine narrative Struktur. Hope ist nicht nur ein hervorragender Geiger – er ist auch ein musikalischer Erzähler. Zuhören lohnt sich.

Wer zu früh klatscht, den bestraft der Dirigent
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 20.10.2009

Feuilleton — Neue Sachbücher
Wie nutzt man die Pause? Was ist ein “Konzert ohne Frack”? Wann setzt der  Beifall ein? Daniel Hope hat einen Wegweiser für Konzertgänger geschrieben.

Der Geiger Daniel Hope hat zusammen mit Wolfgang Knauer ein Buch geschrieben, in dem Moritz und Lena (ein junges Ehepaar, beide Banker) und Larry, ein Taxifahrer aus San Francisco, eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Sie sind, als Widerpart und Gesprächspartner Hopes, aufgeweckte Leute und stellen die richtigen Fragen zur richtigen Zeit.

Allein, sie haben bislang keinen Zugang zur klassischen Musik. Das wird sich im Verlaufe des Buches naturgemäß ändern. “Wann darf ich klatschen?”: Der “Wegweiser für Konzertgänger” soll vor allem solchen, die es werden wollen, Orientierung bieten. Das tut er auf eine durchaus sympathische Weise in schlichten Worten und mit einigem Humor. Daniel Hope ist es gelungen, zusammen mit seinem Koautor eine denkbar geradlinige Einführung in das Wesen und die Riten des klassischen Musikbetriebs zu geben. Auf eine kurze Erörterung der wichtigsten musikgeschichtlichen Epochen folgen Informationen zur Kleiderordnung auf der Bühne und im Saal, zum Seelenleben eines Orchesters, zum Verhältnis von Dirigent und Solist, zur Frage des Lampenfiebers, zur seelischen Befindlichkeit des Solisten, zu den Bräuchen des Verbeugens und Beklatschens und zur Frage angemessener Eintrittspreise. Kleine Übersichten – von kurzen Porträts der berühmtesten Dirigenten bis hin zu den besten Orchesterwitzen – runden das insgesamt schlüssige Konzept ab. Wer nichts wusste über das, was sich in einem Konzertsaal vor, auf und hinter der Bühne abspielt, wird dieses Buch mit Gewinn lesen; und man möchte hoffen, dass es nicht bloß als “Geschenkbuch” verbreitet wird, sondern just jene Leser erreicht, an die es sich richtet.

Freilich fußt “Wann darf ich klatschen?” auf Prämissen, die man durchaus in Zweifel ziehen kann. Hope hat sie gleich zu Beginn in dem Kapitel “Warum dieses Buch?” zusammengefasst. Zu den Prämissen gehört, das Interesse an Klassik habe spürbar nachgelassen; es gebe allenthalben einen Besucherschwund bei den Konzerten, die Schallplattenindustrie verzeichne dramatische Einbrüche. Die Zukunft des klassischen Konzerts sei keineswegs gesichert. In dieser krisenhaften Lage bietet nun Hope seine Dienste als “Fremdenführer” an.

Die Rede von der Krise des klassischen Konzertbetriebs ist nicht eben neu, und sie fußt trotz vielfacher Wiederholung auf schwacher empirischer Grundlage. Angeblich ist das Klassikpublikum überaltert. Aber wann je haben in der Geschichte des bürgerlichen Konzerts die Fünfzehn- bis Dreißigjährigen die Säle gefüllt? Wer zwei Stunden ruhig zuhören kann, hat meist bereits ein bestimmtes Alter erreicht – und die Leute werden ja auch immer älter. In Deutschland werden heutzutage mehr klassische Konzerte veranstaltet als je zuvor in der Geschichte. Hunderte von Festivals überziehen das Land mit ihren teils hochattraktiven Angeboten: Staatliche, städtische und freie Spitzenensembles sowie eine oftmals blühende Kirchenmusik buhlen um Zuhörer. Um jedes Konzert zu füllen, müsste Deutschland eine Bevölkerungsexplosion erlebt haben. So aber wächst vor allem der Konkurrenzdruck. Würde man die absolute Zahl aller Besucher klassischer Konzerte von 1960 und heute vergleichen, würde man wohl herausfinden, dass sie stark gestiegen ist.

Die großen CD-Firmen kriseln zwar in der Tat; dafür aber schießen kleine Labels wie Pilze aus dem Boden. Die Branche erlebt einen tiefgreifenden Strukturwandel, der mit dem sich verändernden Repertoire der Musiker zu erklären ist: Nicht mehr die großen Werke des klassischen Kanons bestimmen heute allein die Konzertprogramme, sondern hochspezialisierte Ensembles werben mit teils entlegenen und dennoch hochinteressanten Werken um Aufmerksamkeit. Sie sind bei den kleinen Plattenproduzenten viel besser aufgehoben als bei den großen Konzernen.

Richtig ist gewiss Daniel Hopes Bemerkung, manch einem käme das klassische Konzert mit seiner stereotypen Programmfolge und seinen Riten “altmodisch und verstaubt” vor. Aber auch hier ändert sich vieles mit atemberaubender Geschwindigkeit. Große Orchester laden zu “Konzerten ohne Frack” oder “After Work Lounges” ein, Musikfeste veranstalten “Sonnenaufgangskonzerte” morgens um sieben; Familienkonzerte am Sonntagvormittag werden überrannt; Gesprächskonzerte sind ungeheuer populär, Konzerteinführungen erleben einen ungeahnten Boom. Die Angebote der Chöre und Orchester an die Schulen sind inzwischen so reichhaltig, dass manch ein Lehrer erschöpft aufseufzt. Der Frack freilich ist immer seltener zu sehen; in die Konzerte der Ensembles für Alte und Neue Musik (auch sie Kinder von Achtundsechzig) hatte er ohnehin nie Einzug gehalten.

Was die Ordnung des Konzertprogramms betrifft, so ist die Pause nach dem Solokonzert und vor der Symphonie schon lange nicht mehr sakrosankt. Die überraschendsten Programmkonstellationen sind inzwischen denkbar, Crossover inbegriffen. Was verlorengeht, ist das klassische Konzert als Gottesdienst der Kunstreligion. Man muss diesen Verlust nicht beklagen, und fromme Menschen mögen sich freuen, dass das religiöse Empfinden nun wieder dorthin zurückkehren kann, wo es hingehört: in die Kirche. Alles zusammengenommen, besteht zum Runzeln der Stirn kein Anlass.

Inmitten dieses von Vitalität zeugenden Umbruchs wirkt Daniel Hopes freundliches kleines Buch weniger wie eine dringend benötigte Medizin, sondern eher wie ein Indiz für den sich quasi von selbst vollziehenden Wandel des klassischen Musikbetriebs.
Michael Gassmann
Daniel Hope: “Wann darf ich klatschen?”. Ein Wegweiser für Konzertgänger. Mit Zeichnungen von Christina Thrän. Rowohlt Verlag, Reinbek 2009. 256 S., geb., 19,90 [Euro].
F.A.Z., 20.10.2009, Nr. 243 / Seite 30

 

Wie modern ist Barock?
Rondo Magazine, 21.09.2009

Daniel Hope ist nicht nur der Autor eines neuen Buchs für Klassikeinstieger „Wann darf ich klatschen?“, das im Herbst erscheint. Die darin aufgeworfene Frage „Wie modern ist Barock?“ beantwortet er quasi auch mit seiner neuesten CD…

Und hier klatschen Sie richtig!
Hamburger Abendblatt, 16.09.2009

Liegen die Hürden für den Einstieg in den Live-Genuss klassischer Musik zu hoch? Der Star-Geiger hilft Einsteigern, sich im Konzertsaal wohlzufühlen.

Hamburg. Klassische Konzerte sind die Sorgenkinder der Kulturveranstalter. Der Altersdurchschnitt des Publikums steigt, Nachwuchs bleibt aus, mancher sieht den klassischen Konzertbetrieb schon aussterben.

Aber wäre das so bedauerlich angesichts immer mehr und perfekterer Aufnahmen? Daniel Hope meint: ja. Natürlich ist der südafrikanisch-britische Geiger, ein international gefragter Solist, parteiisch: „Klassische Musik live ist das Größte”, sagt er, „nichts sonst setzt in einem einzigen Moment so viele Glückshormone frei.”

Hope hat die Initiative ergriffen. Während sich Veranstalter und Kulturschaffende überall den Kopf über „coole Locations” und neue Konzertformen zerbrechen, nimmt er den Blickwinkel des potenziellen Hörers ein. „Wann darf ich klatschen?” heißt sein Plädoyer, das er mithilfe des Hamburger Autors Wolfgang Knauer verfasst hat. Gestern stand Hope auf dem Programm des Harbour Front Literaturfestivals – mit einer Lesung, dem Lautenisten Stefan Maass und Auszügen aus seiner CD, die wie das Buch am Freitag erscheint.

Am Tag vor der Lesung sitzt er im Café Leonar am Grindel, seinem Lieblingscafé in Hamburg. Auch wer ihn bislang nur auf der Bühne erlebt hat, erkennt ihn gleich am rötlichen Schopf und den Augen, die sofort Kontakt aufnehmen. Die Gewandtheit seines Auftretens, das Tweedjackett und sein erstaunlich flüssiges Deutsch verraten den Weltenbürger. Auf die Idee, das Buch zu schreiben, kam Hope während einer Lesereise mit seinem ersten Buch „Familienstücke”: „Da traf ich Leute, die Musik lieben, aber nicht ins Konzert gehen. Das war für mich etwas ganz Neues. Einmal hat sich ein Mann gemeldet und gesagt, er hört gern CDs, aber ins Konzert traut er sich nicht. Da habe ich gedacht: Wie kann man den Menschen dieses Gefühl nehmen?”

Was man kennt, muss man nicht fürchten. Deshalb hat Hope eine kurze, amüsante und treffende Einführung in den klassischen Konzertbetrieb geschrieben. Er beschreibt den Ablauf eines Konzerts, lädt zu einem kurzen Ausflug in die Musikgeschichte ein und erklärt, woher die so unverständlich wirkenden, starren Regeln kommen, die so viele von einem Konzertbesuch abhalten.

Die sind nämlich nicht gottgegeben. Zu Mozarts Zeiten unterhielt man sich während einer Aufführung zwanglos, verließ den Saal, lachte und speiste. Die Musik war zur Unterhaltung des Adels da. Erst mit dem Aufkommen des bürgerlichen Sinfoniekonzerts im 19. Jahrhundert begann man, streng in Reihe zu sitzen und andächtig zu lauschen.

Weil sich diese Benimmregeln in Deutschland bis heute gehalten haben, fühlt sich mancher als Eindringling in einem elitären Kreis von Abonnenten, die lieber unter sich bleiben möchten. Beifall zur falschen Zeit kann einem das Kopfschütteln von Hunderten eintragen – und so ein Erlebnis kann einen Konzertneuling umgehend aus dem Weihetempel der Musik verscheuchen. Auch wollen viele Hörer nicht stundenlang stillsitzen, sondern wie bei einem Rockkonzert Gefühle körperlich ausdrücken. Und dann der vermutete Dresscode!

Dass Konzertkarten teurer als Kinokarten sind, lässt Hope dagegen nur halb gelten: „Ein Fußballspiel oder ein Rockkonzert können viel mehr kosten!” Ernster nimmt er die kurze Aufmerksamkeitsspanne einer Generation, die mit Musikstücken im Clipformat aufgewachsen ist.

An der Musik selbst liegt’s nicht, dass Konzerte wenig junges Publikum anlocken, hat Hope bei seinen Feldstudien herausgefunden: Die fänden die Hörer von „ganz okay” bis „saugeil”. Das ist doch die Hauptsache.

Verena Fischer-Zernin, Hamburger Abendblatt

Link: http://www.abendblatt.de/kultur-live/article1185718/Hier-klatschen-Sie-richtig.html

My son, the violinist
The Guardian, 21.08.2009

Aged just three, author Christopher Hope’s son decided to be a violinist. Neither of them realised how many strings would be attached…



2007


Impressive player
The Toronto Star, 28.06.2007

… Hope is an impressive player who can be spirited as well as sensitive. His technique is beyond reproach…

By John Terrauds



2006


Masters his instrument
Berliner Zeitung, 29.09.2006

“The way Hope masters his instrument… qualifies him as a musician on a par with Gidon Kremer“

Wie Hope sein Instrument als Individuum versteht… das qualifiziert ihn als Musiker auf dem Niveau eines Gidon Kremer.“

Top-flight interpreter
The Guardian, 28.05.2006

Violinist Daniel Hope may be rapidly establishing himself as a top-flight interpreter of the mainstream repertory – his recordings of concertos by Britten, Berg, and the two by Shostakovich have been much admired. But his musical horizons extend well beyond the norm.

Classics meet bluegrass
Savannah Morning News, 01.04.2006

When Edgar Meyer, Sam Bush, Mike Marshall and Daniel Hope get together to play, they bring a world of experience and diversity with them. Daniel Hope, the Savannah Music Festival’s associate artistic director, is at home with Mozart and Stravinsky; Bush, with pulsating, foot-stomping bluegrass. For decades, Marshall has dipped very deftly into jazz, classical, bluegrass and Brazilian music. And Meyer, who seemingly has collaborated with almost everybody, plays just about everything.

… Hope joined the others for selected cuts from Meyer’s “Short Trip Home“, nominated for a Grammy several years back. Friday night’s performers played with admirable cohesiveness and virtuosity. Hope, (assuming the role Joshua Bell played in the original recording) is, we learned, not only a renowned violinist but also a first-class fiddler, quite as comfortable with folksy ditties as the thorniest passages in Bartok.

… Were we hearing classical? Bluegrass? Or something in between? We didn’t care! The net effect? Everybody, onlookers and performers alike, relaxed and had a splendid time.



2005


Daniel Hope – frighteningly gifted!
The Washington Post, 29.10.2005

Daniel Hope – frighteningly gifted!

Thriving solo career
The New York Times, 28.10.2005

The British violinist Daniel Hope maintains a thriving solo career that has been built on inventive programming and a probing interpretive style.

Hope wins ECHO Klassik Prize, second year running
, 18.08.2005

Daniel Hope has again won the ECHO Klassik prize, Germany’s most important recording award. This is the second consecutive year that Hope carries home the coveted trophy. The award goes to “East meets West”, Hope’s highly successful recording with Gaurav Mazumdar and Sebastian Knauer, which received a Grammy nomination earlier this year.

The ECHO Klassik prize will be awarded at a live televised event in Munich on October 16th. Other 2005 winners include Anna Netrebko, Rolando Villazon, Hélène Grimaud and Daniel Barenboim.

For more info please visit the ECHO Klassik Website or contact:

Tanja Franke
Head of Warner Classics Germany
Alter Wandrahm 14
D-20457 Hamburg
Tel. +49 40 30 339 609
E-Mail: Tanja.Franke@warnermusic.com

Ireland Sonata
BBC Music Magazine, 25.02.2005

Daniel Hope has rapidly made a name for himself as one of the most outstanding young British violinists, and listening to his interpretation of the Ireland Sonata one sees why…



2004


Violinist named as top young classical performer
The Scotsman, 27.05.2004

A BRITISH violinist who first performed on television at the age of ten was named as the top young classical performer yesterday at the age of 29.

Daniel Hope, who has been hailed as the most important British string player since the cellist Jacqueline du Pré, carried off the prize at the fifth annual Classical Brit Awards at the Albert Hall in London.

The Italian opera singer Cecilia Bartoli was named female artist of the year. Hayley Westenra, the teenage sensation from New Zealand, was one of the three nominees, but failed to win the title.

Top male artist of the year went to the Welsh baritone Bryn Terfel. The orchestral album of the year went to Sir Simon Rattle and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra for Beethoven Symphonies.

The composer Phillip Glass’s soundtrack for the film The Hours won the contemporary music award.

The Classical Brit Awards, launched in 2000, have been cast as the classics’ answer to pop talent shows in the search for wider audiences for classical music. They will be broadcast on ITV this weekend.

Previous shows have seen dramatic boosts in the sales of featured performances.

The pop flavour of the evening was captured by the British rock violinist, Singapore-born Vanessa-Mae. The performance also featured Terfel and Renée Fleming singing their first duet, Bess, You Is My Woman Now, from Porgy and Bess, the Gershwin opera.

Fleming, whose recent UK concert tour included an appearance at Edinburgh’s Usher Hall, won the Outstanding Contribution to Music award.

The violinist Nigel Kennedy, Westenra, the Welsh soprano Katherine Jenkins, opera band Amici Forever and the King’s College Choir also performed. While Westenra failed to win as best female artist, her multi-million-selling album, Pure, was in contention for the best album of the year.

The awards, sponsored by National Savings & Investments, are decided by a jury of music industry representatives.

TIM CORNWELL
ARTS CORRESPONDENT

Terfel and Bartoli beat challenge of ‘crossover’ musicians to take top honours at Classical Brits
The Independent, 27.05.2004

Bryn Terfel and Cecilia Bartoli beat a slew of young newcomers to win the best artist gongs at the fifth annual Classical Brit Awards yesterday at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

The Welsh opera singer Terfel also beat several high-profile musicians, including Luciano Pavarotti and Ludovico Einaudi, to win the coveted best album award.

Among those who were disappointed by the results was Hayley Westenra, the 17-year-old from New Zealand who has been called the “new Charlotte Church“. She was nominated for best album and best female artist. Myleene Klass, who began her musical career as a contestant on Pop Stars, was also among those nominated for best album with Moving On.

Other winners at the award ceremony, which was presented by the ITV news newsreader Katie Derham, included the violin virtuoso Daniel Hope in the young British classical performer category and Phillip Glass, who scooped the contemporary music award for his soundtrack to The Hours.

Terfel and and the Rome-born mezzo-soprano Bartoli emerged as the winners at the ceremony, sponsored by National Savings and Investments, despite a proliferation of young performers such as Westenra and Klass receiving nominations for prestigious awards.

Over recent years, a flood of young “populist“ musicians has prompted accusations from classical music purists that the industry is “dumbing down” and “sexing up” due to its cross-fertilisation with pop.

But only two months ago, the growth in “crossover“ classical music was attributed, in part, to reversing the declining sales. Last year, sales of classical albums increased by 8 per cent to 14 million.

For Rob Dickins, the chairman of the Classical Brit Awards, the diversity of performers on the shortlist was a cause for celebration rather than criticism. “The words ‘dumbing down’ are used to refer to every industry these days,“ he told The Independent. “The point of this show is to open as many doors into classical music as we can.

Music is a rich tapestry of colours. Crossover has become an ugly word but it basically refers to a musician who has the ability to make someone who understands pop music to understand classical music.

“It means a bridge between the two and I look at this as a positive development.“

Vanessa-Mae was one of the first classical recording artists to cross over into mainstream music markets withThe Violin Player, released in 1994. She performed at the inaugural Classical Brit Awards in 2000.

The accolade for Bartoli crowns a high point for the 37-year-old bel canto specialist who recorded an album of arias by Antono Salieri – cast as Mozart’s enemy in the film Amadeus – in London last December. Last year, she was also voted the most popular classical performer at the Gramophone Awards, marking her fourth Grammy in a career spanning 15 years.

Despite the appeal of musicians such as Westenra and Klass, the announcement of the best female and male artist awards came as little surprise, said Mr Dickins. “Bryn [Terfel] is a very serious artist who has simply extended his repertoire,“ he said. “If you are a baritone or a bass, your repertoire is fairly fixed and you do reach a limit in terms of the core classical. And we are not surprised at Cecilia [Bartoli] winning… She is clearly Olympic gold.“

Other winners included Sir Simon Rattle, who won the ensemble/orchestral album of the year award with Beethoven Symphonies and the soprano Renée Fleming, who was awarded the prize for outstanding contribution to music.

AWARD WINNERS

Album of the Year

Bryn Terfel, Bryn, Deutsche Grammaphon/Universal

(Runners-up: Aled Jones, Higher, UCJ/Universal; Amici Forever, The Opera Band, Arista/BMG; Denise Leigh/Jane Gilchrist, Operatunity, EMI Classics; Dominic Miller, Shapes, BBC Music; Hayley Westenra, Pure, Decca/Universal; Lesley Garrett, So Deep Is The Night, EMI Classics; Luciano Pavarotti, Ti Adoro, Decca/Universal; Ludovico Einaudi, Echoes – The Collection, BMG; Myleene Klass, Moving On, UCJ/Universal

Young British Classical Performer

Daniel Hope, Nimbus

(Runners-up: Catrin Finch, Sony Classics; Colin Currie, EMI Classics)

Female Artist of the Year

Cecilia Bartoli, Decca/Universal

(Runners-up: Hayley Westenra, Decca/Universal; Marin Alsop, Naxos / Select Music)

Male Artist of the Year

Bryn Terfel, Deutsche Grammaphon/Universal

(Runners-up: Sir Colin Davis LSO/Harmonia Mundi ; Nigel Kennedy EMI Classics)

Contemporary Music award

Phillip Glass, The Hours, Nonesuch/Warner Classics

(Runners-up: Gidon Kremer, Happy Birthday, Nonesuch/Warner Classics; John Rutter, Distant Land, UCJ/Universal)

Ensemble/Orchestral Album of the Year

Sir Simon Rattle/VPO, Beethoven Symphonies, EMI Classics

(Runners-up: John Rutter/RPO, Distant Land, UCJ/Universal; New College Oxford Choir/Higginbottom, Bach, St John Passion, Naxos/Select Music)

Critics’ Award

Maxim Vengerov/LSO/ Rostropovitch, Britten/Walton, EMI Classics

(Runners-up: LSO/Jansons, Mahler/Symphony no 6; LSO, Harmonia Mundi; Rattle/VPO, Beethoven Symphonies, EMI Classics

Outstanding Contribution to Music

Renée Fleming

The day Menuhin said sorry
The Daily Telegraph, 27.05.2004

Last night, violinist Daniel Hope won Best Young Performer at the Classical Brits. He talks to Peter Culshaw about growing up around the inspirational – and infuriating – Yehudi Menuhin.

The young violinist Daniel Hope is being touted as one of the most exciting British instrumentalists to emerge for many years. The Boston Globe went so far as to suggest that he might be the most important string player since Jacqueline du Pré. His recent record of Berg and Britten violin concertos, hardly the easiest of listens, was record of the week in nearly all the broadsheets, and last night he won a Classical Brit award for best young classical performer of the year at a glossy event at the Albert Hall.

Early promise: Daniel Hope

He explains to me, when I meet him in New York before a concert of the revered Beaux Arts Trio (of which he is the youngest ever member) that he owes much of his success to being brought up in the household of Yehudi Menuhin. Hope’s mother was successively his secretary, agent and then manager.

In fact, it was an unlikely twist of fate that his mother ended up working for Menuhin at all.

“It was just complete luck. She had three interviews that day. One was to work for the Archbishop of Canterbury, one was for a stockbroker and one was for Menuhin. She didn’t get the first two, so she went to the other one. I’m absolutely sure I wouldn’t have become a musician if that hadn’t happened.“

Surrounded by “the most beautiful music“ from infancy, it was not entirely surprising that Hope, now 29, announced at the age of three that he wanted to be a violinist. “Apparently, I kicked and shouted until they gave in and arranged some lessons, although they thought it was a crazy whim. My mother wanted me to do anything else – at one point she suggested I might become a plumber.“

Menuhin himself also thought his enthusiasm was nothing serious, as Hope explains. “It took many years for him to change his opinion. It was only when I started studying with Zakhar Bron, whom Menuhin admired a lot, that he started to get interested. When I was 16 he asked me to come and play for him, having not heard me for perhaps six years.“ Menuhin, he says, apologised for ignoring him and suggested they work together. “I think it was a mixture of shock and, I think, pride as well. When he said we could work together I thought he meant take some lessons, but he wanted me to perform some concertos, which we took on tour. It was unbelievable.“

And how did he find Menuhin as a person? “He was generous, warm-hearted and original. Not to mention infuriating. He had opinions on everything from electric cars to world peace.“

Hope’s next major project is an album called East Meets West, which will include compositions by Ravi Shankar that were performed originally by Mehuhin in the 1960s. While Hope is too young to recall their original recordings, he was there when the two men met and performed subsequently, often when Menuhin was in Switzerland for the summer.

“It was quite a sight to see them performing sitting on the lawn in full dress with the mountains in the background. I have never forgotten listening to the music they made“.

Hope is keen to assure me East Meets West is no cross-over gimmick, but something he has prepared for over a considerable period.

“I’d asked Menuhin whether he would mind if someone did this music again and he said, on the contrary, but you are really going to have to work at it. I ended up doing a crash course in Indian music for two and a half years.“

The demos of the album suggest an effective interplay of idioms, particularly between the sitar of Gaurav Mazumdar (whom Shankar recommended) and Hope’s sinuous violin. The rest of the album features other cultural collisions between the orient and the West – from Ravel’s gypsy Tzigane to Bartók’s Romanian folk dances.

A curiosity of the album is the reintroduction of an instrument developed by Ravel in the 1920s called the lutheal: “It’s a bizarre-looking thing halfway between a typewriter and an organ which is attached to the strings of a piano and enables you to get unbelievable sounds that you would never normally get on a piano – from harp sounds to something between a harpsichord and a fortepiano.“

Hope’s own violin-playing also shows a mixture of styles – there’s a lyricism reminiscent of Menuhin but also a more passionate, Russian-tinged element that he got from his teachers Felix Andrievsky at the Royal College and Zakhar Bron. “Bron was a student of David Oistrakh, who to me was the god of violinists. I became fascinated by that approach to playing that goes back to a very old tradition in Russia.“

A characteristic of Hope’s is a love of an idea or intellectual concept as a peg for a recording, which he enjoys researching. An earlier disc, Forbidden, Not Forgotten, featured music composed by the doomed musicians in the Theresienstadt ghetto in the Second World War. He has experimented with music and the spoken word, having set a play of his father’s to music and recently produced and written the text for an evening of Beethoven that included Mia Farrow as the composer’s maid.

What next? The Four Seasons, perhaps? “I play it in concert, but can’t see any point in recording it.“ This is his chance, I tell him, to dethrone Nigel Kennedy, that other Menuhin protégé. “I wouldn’t want to do that. I mean, I have a lot of respect for the things he’s done, like the Walton Concerto.“

“On the other hand,“ he says, “he may have become trapped in his punk persona. And I certainly can’t see any point in doing the Four Seasons twice.“

He tells me that, every time he gets in a cab in London with his violin, the driver asks him if he knows Kennedy. “But hats off to him. He’s an extremely talented fiddle player.“

So it may not be duelling violins at dawn just yet, but would Hope like Kennedy’s level of fame? “I’m happy if I can play Beethoven one day and something like Ravi Shankar’s music the next. It is nice to sell records but it really wouldn’t bother me one way or the other whether I get recognised by people or not.“

Daniel Hope’s recording of the Berg and Britten violin concertos is on Warner Classics. ‘East Meet West’ will be released in September. The Beaux Arts Trio plays at the Bath Assembly Rooms on June 6.



2003


Violinist’s chair
The Berkshire Eagle, 25.10.2003

Just as a new actor in a play can change the character of the production, a new musician can transform the way a chamber ensemble plays. A recent example was the replacement of Robert Mann, the founding first violinist of the Juilliard String Quartet, by Joel Smirnoff. A more homogeneous playing style ensued.

Something of the same thing has happened to the Beaux Arts Trio with the accession of Daniel Hope to the violinist’s chair. Hope, a fine musician whose passions burn with a controlled warmth, brings elegance to the mix. Like silver, he brings out the best colors in his surroundings.

Western classical musicians
Evening Standard, 25.06.2003

We now have some Western classical musicians – like Daniel Hope – who have real empathy and understanding for Indian music.



2002


A magnificent sound
The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 25.06.2002

“Hope’s tone relies less on brilliance, more on inner balance, his vibrato unbelievably flexible and a magnificent sound without the slightest trace of kitsch……this is simply astonishing violinist ability and musical intelligence.”

Very skillful instrumentalist
The Boston Globe, 25.03.2002

Hope, touted as the most important British string player since Jacqueline du Pre, is a very skillful instrumentalist with exceptionally refined musical impulses. His tone remains beautiful, and dead in tune…



2001


If he’d dreamt it himself
The Independent, 25.01.2001

Hard on the heels of Maxim Vengerov’s superb Teldec recording of Elgar’s Violin Sonata comes a thought-provoking Nimbus rival from Daniel Hope, more inward-looking than Vengerov though no less heart-rending, and with more appropriate couplings.

Hope negotiates each sighing phrase as if he’d dreamt it himself. But there’s another, more significant perspective to his performance, specifically in the movement that the composer described as “fantastic” and “curious“… where the score’s darker side registers as never before. Hope’s annotations are as compelling as his performances, and the rest of his programme conjures parallel strains of wistfulness… the Walton, commissioned and recorded by Menuhin, is one of the great 20th-century British duo sonatas, and this is surely its finest modern recording to date.



2000


Wonderful works
Münchener Abendzeitung (en), 30.08.2000

A very brave violinist: to record an all 20th-Century violin programme requires courage… the young Englishman Daniel Hope – who recently replaced Nigel Kennedy in an open-air concert in Munich – possesses not only this courage, but also gets right to the heart of these wonderful works.

Such supremacy
Fonoforum, 25.08.2000

One has to award full marks to Hope in all areas… he masters everything with such supremacy… everything is exactly in its place. As many good young violinists as there are today – the name of Daniel Hope should be especially noted.



1999


Brilliant CD-Debut
RONDO Magazine, 26.12.1999

Thomas Schulz chooses:
1999 Artist/Ensemble of the Year : “Daniel Hope, for his brilliant CD-Debut of contemporary violin concertos.“

Young Artist of the Year
FONOFORUM Magazine, 25.12.1999

Jörg Hillebrandt chooses: DANIEL HOPE – as “1999 Young Artist of the Year“.

“Daniel Hope … whose artistic strength and intelligent choice of programming one can rely on.“

HOPE has long been fulfilled
MUSIC MANUAL Magazine, 25.08.1999

Today we have Bartoli, Larmore, Podles and especially Kasarova … and then there is someone else who is currently being propelled into the market: Daniel Hope, pupil and colleague of Yehudi Menuhin.

He has just released his Debut-CD (Nimbus) which clearly stands out in its choice of programme. After a first-hearing of Hope’s recording one is almost voracious to hear what he will record next, equally the standard as well as newly discovered repertoire. There are still those today who can match the great ‘legends’. For example him, there is Hope, and HOPE has long been fulfilled!

He who dares wins
FONOFORUM Magazine, 25.07.1999

No Mendelssohn, no Bruch and no Tchaikovsky – to dedicate a Debut CD entirely to 20th century works requires courage and huge confidence in one’s own ability. And not least a label who believes in the artist and who is prepared to take risks. This is the combination present on Daniel Hope’s première disc … Hope has proved himself consistently on stage, and now similarly in the recording studio, boasting a daredevil violinistic ability that at no point leaves us in any doubt. His commitment to new music has been authoritatively inspired through personal contact with composers such as Takemitsu and Schnittke, which adds even more to the appeal of this recording.

Takemitsu’s Nostalghia was authorized by the composer … Hope brings out its many facets with a slim, colourful tone. And Schnittke’s polystylicsm …  is grasped by soloist, conductor and orchestra with a winning, clear-cut precision. With Weill’s Violin Concerto, Hope is up against the excellent recordings by Tetzlaff (Virgin) and Frank Peter Zimmermann (EMI), and need not worry about any comparison. The further development of this violinist should be followed closely…

20th-century musical avantgarde
The Philadelphia Inquirer, 27.06.1999

Pick of the week: The 25-year-old Brit with a lusty tone makes a serious and seriously impressive recording debut with four works with four distinct views of dissonance. Hope chose worthy and under-performed pieces that, taken as a group, make a friendly and powerful statement about the 20th-century musical avantgarde.

Totally in sympathy
Classical Music Web, 26.06.1999

This appears to be the recording debut of the violinist, Daniel Hope. He is to be congratulated for the enterprising choice of music. No Mendelssohn/Bruch launch for him! He seems totally in sympathy with the music: dedicated and dazzling whether in virtuosity or in poetic sensitivity.

Talented young violinist
RONDO Magazine, 24.06.1999

What a relief: a highly talented young violinist, who on his first CD presents not the umpteenth interpretation of the Beethoven or Brahms concertos, but instead unknown works from our century.

Daniel Hope, born in England in 1974, possesses not only a stupendous technique, but also the creative intelligence necessary to bring off Kurt Weill’s drole Violin Concerto. The bitter charm of this work … is exactly right in Hope’s hands. His tone is slim but has at the same time huge warmth, also avoiding any trace of sentimentality. The works by Schnittke and Takemitsu have an added authenticity through the personal contact between Hope and both composers. In particular Takemitsu’s Nostalghia … captivates us through its deep expressiveness and, true to its title, almost nostalgic beauty. Not an everyday release, in return all the more rewarding.

Especially recommended.

Highly recommended
The San Franciso Examiner, 24.05.1999

Daniel Hope, now 25, boasts a background as a prodigy (he was discovered at 10 by renowned bassist Gary Karr), but, on the evidence here, he has developed into a mature artist who is profoundly committed to the finer music of his own time.

The music, rather than the musician, is served on this exceptionally valuable collection. Hope yields to no violinist in his expressive intensity … and Toru Takemitsu’s lyrical tribute to film director Andrei Takovksy receives and exquisite rendering here, one of the Japanese composer’s most beautiful utterances.

Highly recommended.

Eloquently focused performance
BBC Music Magazine, 27.04.1999

In their various ways, all four pieces live on an expressive edge, and admirably showcase the considerable talents of young violinist, Daniel Hope. Hope finds much poetry, as well as bitter with … an eloquently focused performance.

Takemitsu himself praised Hope’s interpretation of Nostalghia. Hope’s account, more spacious than Otto Derloez, seems well-nigh definitive. Altogether an impressive release, thoughtfully planned and documented, the recording excellently balanced.

***** (5 Stars) Performance

***** (5 Stars) Sound

Safe in his hands…
BBC Music Magazine, 26.04.1999

…a champion of the comtemporary violin:

The remarkable new talent of British violinist Daniel Hope has been launched skyward with a debut recording…

Hope has undoubtedly gained invaluable insights into both Schnittke’s personality and his music … the future of the contemporary violin is indeed safe in his hands.

Hope’s magical sustaining
The Straud Magazine, 25.04.1999

The Straud Magazine

Extremely enterprising
Classic CD Magazine, 24.04.1999

Daniel Hope is clearly a name to watch. His debut recording is not only extremely enterprising … but already reveals a wide range of musical awareness. Hope finds much poetry … the performance is just as compelling as that given by Spivakov.

Highly enterprising debut disc betokening a major new talent.

***** (5 Stars) Performance

***** (5 Stars) Sound



1995


Remember the name
Independent on Sunday, 25.01.1995

An exceptional soloist – the young star violinist Daniel Hope, who is already launched on a major professional career, real lyrical gifts and an enviably fluent technique. Remember the name.